12 found

Year:

  1.  5
    Introduction: Consequences in Medieval Logic.Jacob Archambault - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):201-221.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 201 - 221 This paper summarizes medieval definitions and divisions of consequences and explains the import of the medieval development of the theory of consequence for logic today. It then introduces the various contributions to this special issue of _Vivarium_ on consequences in medieval logic.
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  2.  5
    Consequence and Formality in the Logic of Walter Burley.Jacob Archambault - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):292-319.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 292 - 319 With William of Ockham and John Buridan, Walter Burley is often listed as one of the most significant logicians of the medieval period. Nevertheless, Burley’s contributions to medieval logic have received notably less attention than those of either Ockham or Buridan. To help rectify this situation, the author here provides a comprehensive examination of Burley’s account of consequences, first recounting Burley’s enumeration, organization, and division of consequences, with particular attention to (...)
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  3.  3
    The Roots of the Notion of Containment in Theories of Consequence.Bianca Bosman - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):222-240.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 222 - 240 In medieval theories of consequence, we encounter several criteria of validity. One of these is known as the containment criterion: a consequence is valid when the consequent is contained or understood in the antecedent. The containment criterion was formulated most frequently in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, but it can be found in earlier writings as well. In _The Tradition of the Topics in the Middle Ages_, N.J. Green-Pedersen claimed that (...)
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  4.  3
    Marsilius of Inghen on the Definition of Consequentia.Graziana Ciola - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):272-291.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 272 - 291 This paper offers an analysis of Marsilius of Inghen’s definition of _consequentia_ and of his treatment of logical validity as presented in the first book of his treatise on _Consequentiae_. Comparing Marsilius of Inghen’s, John Buridan’s, and Albert of Saxony’s theories, the author argues that Marsilius’ account is based on a conception of consequence as a relation of entailment among propositions rather than as a type of conditional sentence and, thus, (...)
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  5.  2
    Formal and Material Consequences in Ockham and Buridan.Milo Crimi - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):241-271.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 241 - 271 William of Ockham and John Buridan provide different accounts of the distinction between formal and material consequences. Some consequences – in particular, enthymemes – that Ockham would classify as formal would be classified as material by Buridan. This paper explains this taxonomical discrepancy. It identifies the root of the discrepancy not in a difference between Ockham’s and Buridan’s notions of propositional hylomorphism but rather in Ockham’s endorsement of relational characterizations of (...)
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  6.  4
    The Theory of Natural Consequence.Christopher J. Martin - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):340-366.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 340 - 366 The history of thinking about consequences in the Middle Ages divides into three periods. During the first of these, from the eleventh to the middle of the twelfth century, and the second, from then until the beginning of the fourteenth century, the notion of natural consequence played a crucial role in logic, metaphysics, and theology. The first part of this paper traces the development of the theory of natural consequence in (...)
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  7.  3
    Consequence and ‘Cause’: Thirteenth-Century Reflections on the Nature of Consequences.Joke Spruyt - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):320-339.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 320 - 339 Thirteenth-century views on consequences have not yet received much attention. Authors of this period deserve closer scrutiny, because of their profound interest in the nature of consequence. The fundamental feature of a consequence was captured in the claim that its antecedent is the cause of its consequent. At the same time authors systematically discussed consequences in terms of truth-preservation. This paper considers the requirements of syllogistic argument and consequences in general, (...)
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  8.  13
    Dominic of Flanders’ Critique of John Duns Scotus’ Primary Argument for the Univocity of Being.Domenic D’Ettore - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):176-199.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 1-2, pp 176 - 199 This article considers the attempt by a prominent fifteenth-century follower of Thomas Aquinas, Dominic of Flanders, to address John Duns Scotus’ most famous argument for the univocity of being. According to Scotus, the intellect must have a concept of being that is univocal to substantial and accidental being, and to finite and infinite being, on the grounds that an intellect cannot be both certain and doubtful through the same concept, but (...)
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  9.  7
    Aquinas’ Ontology of Transeunt Causal Activity.Gloria Frost - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):47-82.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 1-2, pp 47 - 82 This paper reconstructs and analyzes Thomas Aquinas’ intriguing views on transeunt causal activity, which have been the subject of an interpretive debate spanning from the fifteenth century up until the present. In his _Physics_ commentary, Aquinas defends the Aristotelian positions that the actualization of an agent’s active potential is the motion that it causes in its patient and action and passion are the same motion. Yet, in other texts, Aquinas claims (...)
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  10.  9
    L’Hypothèse de la Cessation des Mouvements Célestes au XIV E Siècle : Nicole Oresme, Jean Buridan Et Albert de Saxe.Aurora Panzica - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):83-125.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 1-2, pp 83 - 125 Aristotelian cosmology implies the plurality of celestial motion for the process of generation and corruption in the sublunar world. In order to investigate the structure of the cosmos and the degree of dependence of the sublunar on the supralunar region, medieval Latin commentators on Aristotle explored the consequences of the cessation of celestial motion. This paper analyses the position of some philosophers of the fourteenth-century Parisian school, namely Nicole Oresme, John (...)
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  11.  14
    Lucifer Princeps Tenebrarum … The Epistola Luciferi and Other Correspondence of the Cistercian Pierre Ceffons.Chris Schabel - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):126-175.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 1-2, pp 126 - 175 The famous _Epistola Luciferi_, written in late 1351 or early 1352, caused quite a stir in the Avignon of Pope Clement VI, quickly became a medieval best-seller, and thereafter remained topical, being copied and printed down to the present day. Traditionally ascribed to Nicole Oresme or Henry of Langenstein, the letter was attributed to the Cistercian Pierre Ceffons by Damasus Trapp in 1957. Trapp merely took Ceffons’ authorship for granted, however, (...)
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  12.  7
    Necessity and Future-Dependence: ‘Ockhamist’ Accounts of Abraham’s Faith at Paris Around 1200.Wojciech Wciórka - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (1-2):1-46.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 1-2, pp 1 - 46 This article aims to show that the so-called ‘Ockhamist’ solution to the determinist challenge was a commonplace among Parisian scholastics around 1200. On the ‘Ockhamist’ view, some propositions about the past do not fall under the necessity of the past, since their truth-value depends on the future. The paper focuses on two puzzles involving Abraham’s belief in the future Incarnation. The author discusses the ‘Ockhamist’ strategies adopted by theologians of the (...)
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