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  1.  6
    The Three Modes of the Buddha’s Dharma.Giuseppe Ferraro - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):23-44.
    With regards the crucial issue of the existence of the self, within canonical texts of the Buddhist Abhidharma schools we find passages that are frequently at odds with one another. Sometimes the Buddha defends or respects the belief in the self and in personal continuity; at other times he seems to deny that beyond the psycho-physical factors to which our existential experience can be reduced there is an ātman that contains, owns or controls these same factors; in further cases still, (...)
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  2.  1
    The Householder as Support and Source of the Āśramas in the Mānava Dharmaśāstra.Christopher G. Framarin - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):1-22.
    Medhātithi reduces Manu’s descriptions of the householder as support and source of the āśramas to his performance of the five great sacrifices. Patrick Olivelle characterizes Medhātithi’s interpretation as “radical,” but a strong preliminary case might be made in its favor. Nonetheless, there are a number of reasons to resist Medhātithi’s interpretation. The more plausible interpretation of these passages is also the most straightforward. The householder is the support of the other three āśramas because he is economically productive. He is the (...)
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  3.  3
    The Role of Prāṇa in Sāṃkhya Discipline for Freedom.Ana Laura Funes Maderey - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):81-103.
    Classical Sāṃkhya has usually been interpreted as an intellectualist school. Its presumed method for the attainment of liberation is essentially characterized by rational inquiry into reality, which involves the intellectual understanding of the distinction between two principles: the conscious and the material. Some have argued that this liberating process is not only theoretical, but that it entails yogic practice, or that it is the natural outcome of existential forces that tend toward freedom. However, recent studies in Sāṃkhya involving detailed analysis (...)
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  4.  3
    The Song of Vāsudeva: Some Remarks on a Recently Rediscovered Manuscript of Vāsudēvappāṭṭu, a Devotional Work Ascribed to Pūntānam.G. Sudev Krishna Sharman & Maciej Karasinski-Sroka - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):105-128.
    The main aim of this paper is to discuss a recently discovered manuscript of Vāsudēvappāṭṭu and to comment on the characteristic features of the text: its devotional content, language and philosophy. Vāsudēvappāṭṭu is a bhakti song written in the Tamil-Maṇipravāḷa language and attributed to Pūntānam, one of the prominent devotional poets of Kerala, who is often praised as a talented and prolific writer and an ardent devotee of Kṛṣṇa. The first section of the paper investigates the linguistic features of the (...)
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  5.  6
    What To Do with the Past?: Sanskrit Literary Criticism in Postcolonial Space.V. S. Sreenath - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):129-144.
    Throughout its history of almost a millennium and a half, Sanskrit kāvyaśāstra was resolutely obsessed with the task of unravelling the ontology kāvya. Literary theoreticians in Sanskrit, irrespective of their spatio-temporal locations, unanimously agreed upon the fact that kāvya was a special mode of expression characterized by the presence of certain unique linguistic elements. Nonetheless, this did not imply that kāvyaśāstra was an intellectual tradition unmarked by disagreements. The real point of contention among the practitioners of Sanskrit literary theory was (...)
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  6.  4
    How a Philosopher Reads Kālidāsa: Vedāntadeśika’s Art of Devotion.Shiv Subramaniam - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):45-80.
    Vedāntadeśika is one of many Sanskrit intellectuals who wrote prolifically in both poetic and philosophical genres. This essay considers how his poetry is related to his philosophical concerns. Scholars have understood the relationship between his poetry and philosophy in a number of ways, some arguing that his poetry permitted a freer exploration of his philosophical ideas, others wishing to discuss his poems independently of his philosophy. My paper will propose a distinct way of understanding this relationship by focusing specifically on (...)
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