Year:

  1.  7
    Khu Lo Tsā Ba’s Treatise: Distinguishing the Svātantrika/*Prāsaṅgika Difference in Early Twelfth Century Tibet.James B. Apple - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (5):935-981.
    The teachings of Madhyamaka have been the basis of Tibetan Buddhist thought and practice since the eighth century. After the twelfth century, Tibetan scholars distinguished two branches of Madhyamaka: Autonomist and Consequentialist. What distinctions in Madhyamaka thought and practice did twelfth century Tibetan scholars make to differentiate these two branches? This article focuses upon a newly identified twelfth century Tibetan manuscript on Madhyamaka from the Collected Works of the Kadampas: Khu lo tsā ba’s Treatise. Khu lo tsā ba, also known (...)
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  2.  5
    Advayavajra’s Tattvaratnāvalī : A Newly Revised Critical Edition.Torsten Gerloff - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (5):805-843.
    The following article presents a fully revised critical edition of Advayavajra’s Tattvaratnāvalī, one of the earliest and most influential texts that can be accredited to the genre of Buddhist siddhānta literature. In this text Advayavajra not only reveals his own overall perception of the Indian Buddhist schools of the eleventh century, but also supplies manifold insights into the various tenets of Buddhist philosophy, providing the first key for anyone interested in entering the vast spheres of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies. This newly (...)
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  3.  4
    Sa Skya Paṇḍita’s Classification of Arguments by Consequence Based on the Type of the Logical Reason: Editorial Conundrum and Mathematics for Commentators.Pascale Hugon - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (5):845-887.
    This paper examines a passage of the eleventh chapter of the Rigs gter of Sa skya Paṇḍita on the division of arguments by consequence of the form “Because S is P, it follows that it is Q” with respect to the type of relation between P and Q. This passage appears in quite different versions in several available recensions of the Rigs gter, all of which are problematic to some extent. The different interpretations of the commentators can be shown to (...)
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  4. An Early Modern Account of the Views of the Miśras.Christopher Minkowski - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (5):889-933.
    In a doxography of views called the Ṣaṭtantrīsāra, a seventeenth century commentator and Advaitin, Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara, describes the doctrines of a group he calls the Miśras. Nīlakaṇṭha represents the doctrines of the Miśras as in most ways distinct from those of the canonical positions that usually appear in such doxographies, both āstika and nāstika. And indeed, some of the doctrines he describes resemble those of the Abrahamic faiths, concerning the creator, a permanent afterlife in heaven or hell, and the unique (...)
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  5.  5
    An Early Indian Interpretive Puzzle: Vedic Etymologies as a Tool for Thinking.Paolo Visigalli - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (5):983-1007.
    Etymologies are often encountered in Vedic prose, in Brāhmaṇas and early Upaniṣads. Though they have received a fair amount of scholarly attention, Vedic etymologies still present a challenge to interpreters. To respond to it, I critically review previous interpretations, and focus on three case studies, Aitareya Brāhmaṇa 1.1.2, Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad 1.3, and Chāndogya Upaniṣad 6.8. In my interpretation, I emphasize the need for a contextual reading, foreground Vedic etymologies’ complexity and sophistication, and call attention to the variety of purposes they (...)
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  6.  8
    The Three Natures and the Path to Liberation in Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda Thought.Joy Cecile Brennan - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (4):621-648.
    This paper provides a new interpretation of the three natures theory of Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda thought by means of an examination of the path theory associated with it, which has not been previously examined in scholarly literature. The paper first examines this path theory in a number of foundational texts to show that the widely accepted pivotal model is not in fact the three natures model that predominates in foundational Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda literature. Second, the paper offers a new interpretation of the three natures (...)
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  7.  6
    Mahāsukhavajra’s Padmāvatī Commentary on the Sixth Chapter of the Caṇḍamahāroṣaṇatantra: The Sexual Practices of a Tantric Buddhist Yogī and His Consort.Samuel Grimes & Péter-Dániel Szántó - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (4):649-693.
    A single Sanskrit commentary exists for the Caṇḍamahāroṣaṇatantra—the Padmāvatī of Mahāsukhavajra—the only palm-leaf witness of which is preserved in a late thirteenth-century manuscript in Kathmandu. The tantra is relatively late, unmentioned outside Nepal, and the only in-depth study to date examines only the first eight of its twenty five chapters. No study or edition of the Padmāvatī exists. Here we present the first edition and translation of a complete chapter, the sixth paṭala, a section dealing mainly with transgressive sexual practices. (...)
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  8.  10
    Reformulating the Buddhist Free Will Problem: Why There Can Be No Definitive Solution.Katie Javanaud - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (4):773-803.
    In recent years, scholars have become increasingly interested in reconstructing a Buddhist stance on the free will problem. Since then, Buddhism has been variously described as implicitly hard determinist, paleo-compatibilist, neo-compatibilist and libertarian. Some scholars, however, question the legitimacy of Buddhist free will theorizing, arguing that Buddhism does not share sufficiently many presuppositions required to articulate the problem. This paper argues that, though Buddhist and Western versions of the free will problem are not perfectly isomorphic, a problem analogous to that (...)
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  9.  2
    Observations on the Term Bhavaṅga as Described in the Jié Tuō Dào Lùn : Its Proper English Translation and Understanding.Kyungrae Kim - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (4):753-771.
    The term bhavaṅga is regarded as a unique technical term of Theravāda abhidhamma tradition, and the text Jié tuō dào lùn, i.e. the Chinese translation of *Vimuttimagga, mentions yŏufēnxīn the Chinese counterpart of bhavaṅga eleven times. These occurrences are found in the section of the text on the cognitive process. The text is, however, too abstruse to understand the term easily, and the existing translations of it are imperfect. Subsequently, the term in the Jié tuō dào lùn has been considered (...)
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  10.  2
    Reciting, Chanting, and Singing: The Codification of Vocal Music in Buddhist Canon Law.Cuilan Liu - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (4):713-752.
    This article analyzes the treatment of music in Buddhist monastic life through the rules on music in Buddhist canon law within the six extant traditions, which are preserved in Chinese, Tibetan, Pāli, and fragmentary Sanskrit manuscripts. These texts distinguish and differentiate instrumental and vocal music, presenting song, dance, and instrumental music as a triad and further subdividing vocal music into reciting, chanting, and singing. The performance and consumption of singing is strictly prohibited. Regulations on chanting and recitation are mutually exclusive (...)
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  11.  5
    The Isomorphism of Space and Time in Debates Over Momentariness.David Nowakowski - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (4):695-712.
    In the course of his critique of the Buddhist doctrine of universal momentariness, Udayana argues for an isomorphism between our understandings of space and time, which is meant to undercut the Buddhists’ well-known “inference from existence.” The present paper examines these arguments from Udayana’s Ātmatattvaviveka, together with Ratnakīrti’s treatment of them in his Kṣaṇabhaṅgasiddhi Anvayātmikā. As an historical study, the paper aims to elucidate the connections between Udayana and Ratnakīrti, and the implications of those connections for the dependence of the (...)
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  12.  4
    Chance and Causality: Of Crows, Palm Trees, God and Salvation.Phyllis Granoff - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):399-418.
    This paper was written for a workshop, Chance and Contingency in Indian Philosophy, that was held at Yale University in May 2017. It examines the role that chance plays by focusing on the popular maxim of the crow and the palm tree. It argues that while representatives of different schools of thought were aware of the possibility of purely random occurrences, they dealt with it very differently. For some like the Vedāntins chance provided proof of their positions, while for others, (...)
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  13.  3
    How Do We Understand the Meaning of a Sentence Under the Yogācāra Model of the Mind? On Disputes Among East Asian Yogācāra Thinkers of the Seventh Century.Ching Keng - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):475-504.
    Understanding the meaning of a sentence is crucial for Buddhists because they put so much emphasis on understanding the verbal expressions of the Buddha. But this can be problematic under their metaphysical framework of momentariness, and their epistemological framework of multiple consciousnesses. This paper starts by reviewing the theory of five states of mind in the Yogācārabhūmi, and then investigates debates among medieval East Asian Yogācāra thinkers about how various consciousnesses work together to understand the meaning of a sentence. The (...)
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  14.  6
    On the Argument of Infinite Regress in Proving Self-Awareness.King Chung Lo - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):553-576.
    In PV 3.440ab and 473cd–474ab, Dharmakīrti raises the argument of infinite regress twice. The argument originates from the same argument stated by Dignāga in his Pramāṇasamuccaya 1.12ab1, in which the fault of infinite regress is called aniṣṭhā. In Pramāṇasamuccayavṛtti 1.12b2, Dignāga presents another type of argument of infinite regress driven by memory, which is elucidated by Dharmakīrtian commentators. The arguments were criticized by Kumārila Bhaṭṭa and Bhaṭṭa Jayanta and even more intensively so by two modern scholars, Jonardon Ganeri and Birgit (...)
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  15.  7
    Is Ratnākaraśānti a gZhan Stong Pa?Hong Luo - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):577-619.
    The doctrinal position of Ratnākaraśānti is a source of great controversy among modern scholars. As diversified as the modern understanding of Ratnākaraśānti’s doctrinal position is the traditional ways in which the gZhan stong view is defined in Tibet. This paper aims to argue, with special attention paid on his presentation of the three natures, that Ratnākaraśānti defines his own doctrine as Rang bzhin gsum gyi dbu ma / *Trisvabhāva- mādhyamika in his “Core Trilogy”: the Prajñāpāramitopadeśa, the Madhyamakālaṅkāropadeśa, and the Madhyamakālaṅkāravṛttimadhyamapratipatsiddhi, (...)
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  16.  4
    Kamalaśīla on Doubt as the Cause of the Activity of Reading.Hiroko Matsuoka - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):455-473.
    As Funayama has shown, Dharmakīrti’s successors had an animated discussion on the nature and function of the initial statement of scientific treatises in terms of its effectiveness and requisites. Arcaṭa in his comments on the initial statement of the Hetubindu considers that the initial statement, which contains the purpose of the treatise, is useless in prompting people to undertake the activity of reading the treatise because judicious people are supposed to undertake action only due to certainty which never arises from (...)
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  17.  4
    On Dharmakīrti’s Notion of Contingency/Dependence, with a Special Focus on Vināśa.Masamichi Sakai - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):419-436.
    The concept of contingency is very much debated. In this paper, I’ll offer a novel interpretation of it in Dharmakīrti’s ontology, focusing on his treatment and understanding of vināśa which is, according to Dharmakīrti, not contingent and thus occurs necessarily to everything. I will do so by clarifying some important terms, motivating and explaining Dharmakīrti’s position, and analyzing firsthand some Dharmakīrtian debate excerpts with Nyāya and/or Vaiśeṣika philosophers as the main opponents. In the course of this, I will show that (...)
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  18.  2
    How to Deal with Future Existence: Sarvāstivāda, Yogic Perception, and Causality.Kiyokuni Shiga - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):437-454.
    This paper mainly addresses the following issues: how Buddhists deal with future existence, the difference between yogic perception and the cognition of ordinary people with regard to future entities, and how Buddhists resolve the contradiction between the theory of momentariness and that of action and its fruit. According to the Sarvāstivādins, a future entity exists in reality as long as there is cognition that has this entity as its object. According to the Sautrāntikas, however, that theory does not hold true. (...)
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  19.  4
    The Making of Tantric Orthodoxy in the Eleventh-Century Indo-Tibetan World: *Jñānākara’s * Mantrāvatāra.Aleksandra Wenta - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):505-551.
    My paper focuses on one of the most influential, but hardly explored, scholar of the phyi dar period *Jñānākara. *Jñānākara’s *Mantrāvatāra and his auto-commentary, *Mantrāvatāra-vṛtti, which have been lost in the original Sanskrit, but can be accessed in Tibetan translation as Gsang sngags la ’jug pa and Gsang sngags la ’jug pa’i ’grel pa respectively, provides a comprehensive picture of doctrinal debate that dominated the scene in the intellectual history of the eleventh-century Indo-Tibetan world, through demonstrating various perspectives on tantric (...)
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  20.  24
    Some Reflections on the Term Sautrāntika in Vinaya Context: Vinayadharaḥ Sautrāntikaḥ in the Mahāparinirvāṇa-Mahāsūtra.Hiromi Habata - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):241-261.
    The word sautrāntika is known to designate one of the philosophical schools in later documents, but its earlier phase remains uncertain. The discovery of this term in the Mahāparinirvāṇa-mahāsūtra thus brings forward new evidence essential for solving the problem of sautrāntika. In this paper, I will attempt to establish the interpretation of the context, in which the phrase vinayadharaḥ sautrāntikaḥ appears.
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  21.  11
    Conceptuality and Non-Conceptuality in Yogācāra Sources.Jowita Kramer - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):321-338.
    This paper investigates the Yogācāra notions of “conceptuality”, represented by terms such as vikalpa, on the one hand, and of “non-conceptuality” on the other. The examination of the process of thinking as well as its absence has played a central role in the history of Yogācāra thought. The explanations of this process provided by Yogācāra thinkers in works such as the Yogācārabhūmi, the Mahāyānasūtrālaṃkāra and the Mahāyānasaṃgraha appear to be mainly concerned with the contents and the components of thoughts, categorizing (...)
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  22.  5
    Jayasena’s Proof of the Authenticity of the Mahāyāna Scriptures.Shigeki Moro - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):339-353.
    We can find some of the works of Indian Buddhist philosophers that prove the authenticity of the Mahāyāna sutras within Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Chinese textual sources. *Jayasena’s critique of *Asvabhāva’s proof was first introduced in the commentaries of Kuiji. Numerous references to *Jayasena in Chinese Yogācāra scriptures indicate that he was regarded as a Yogācāra master. His revised proof was further revised by Xuanzang. According to Xuanzang’s biographies, *Jayasena was an Indian lay Buddhist scholar who had many non-Buddhist disciples. It (...)
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  23.  11
    Some Remarks on the Genesis of Central Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda Concepts.Lambert Schmithausen - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):263-281.
    The present paper is a kind of selective summary of my book The Genesis of Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda. [1.–2.] It deals with questions of origin and early development of three basic concepts of this school, viz., the ‘idealist’ thesis that the whole world is mind only or manifestation only, the assumption of a subliminal layer of the mind, and the analysis of phenomena in terms of the “Three Natures”. [3.] It has been asserted that these three basic concepts are logically inseparable and (...)
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  24.  8
    Yogācāra Substrata? Precedent Frames for Yogācāra Thought Among Third-Century Yoga Practitioners in Greater Gandhāra.Daniel M. Stuart - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):193-240.
    The connection between early yogācāras, or practitioners of yoga, and later Yogācāra-vijñānavāda philosophy has long preoccupied scholars. But these connections remain obscure. This article suggests that a text that has received little attention in modern scholarship, the Saddharmasmṛtyupasthānasūtra, may shed light on aspects of early yogācāra contemplative cultures that gave rise to some of the formative dynamics of Yogācāra-vijñānavāda thought. I show how traditional Buddhist meditative practice and engagement with Abhidharma theoretics come together in the Saddharmasmṛtyuasthānasūtra to produce a novel (...)
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  25.  8
    The Tantric Context of Ratnākaraśānti’s Philosophy of Mind.Davey K. Tomlinson - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):355-372.
    The conflicting positions of the two early eleventh century Yogācāra scholars, Ratnākaraśānti and his critic Jñānaśrīmitra, concerning whether or not consciousness can exist without content are inseparable from their respective understandings of enlightenment. Ratnākaraśānti argues that consciousness can be contentless —and that, for a buddha, it must be. Mental content can be defeated by reasoning and made to disappear by meditative cultivation, and so it is fundamentally distinct from the nature of consciousness, which is never defeated and never ceases. That (...)
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  26.  7
    Traces of Yogācāra in the Chapter on Reality Within a Work on the Paths and Stages by Gling-Ras-Pa Padma Rdo-Rje.Marco Walther - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):373-398.
    This article aims to introduce some features of the literary output of Gling-ras-pa Padma rdo-rje, who was the teacher of the ‘Brug-pa bKa’-brgyud-pa school’s founder, gTsan-pa rGya-ras Ye-shes rdo-rje in Tibet. The work that I draw upon here is titled A Torch of Crucial Points. A Condensation and Presentation of all Dharmas that are to be Practiced, a presentation of the entire outline of Buddhist practice that resembles the doctrinal stages literary genre. Based on an edition and translation of the (...)
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  27.  2
    Ālayavijñāna From a Practical Point of View.Nobuyoshi Yamabe - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (2):283-319.
    In 1987, Lambert Schmithausen published an important extensive monograph on the origin of ālayavijñāna. In his opinion, the introduction of ālayavijñāna was closely linked to nirodhasamāpatti, but it was not meditative experience itself that directly lead to the introduction of this new concept. Rather, according to Schmithausen, it was dogmatic speculation on a sūtra passage about nirodhasamāpatti. My own hypothesis is that the introduction of ālayavijñāna was more directly based on meditative experiences. Focusing on the “Proof Portion” of the Viniścayasaṃgrahaṇī (...)
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  28.  10
    Abhinavagupta on the Kashmirian Gītā.Lyne Bansat-Boudon & Judit Törzsök - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):31-64.
    This paper announces the first critical edition of Abhinavagupta’s commentary on the Bhagavadgītā in its Kashmirian recension, based on one Kashmirian Devanāgarī and seven Śāradā manuscripts in addition to two existing non-critical editions. The volume will also include a new edition of the Kashmirian recension of the Bhagavadgītā and a full French translation. After a short presentation of Abhinavagupta’s commentary and a discussion of previous work on the subject, the manuscripts used are listed and briefly described. The question and importance (...)
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  29.  10
    Nāgārjuna’s Fictional World.C. W. Huntington - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):153-177.
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  30.  5
    Who Wrote the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa? Reflections on an Enigmatic Text and Its Place in the History of Buddhist Philosophy.Matthew T. Kapstein - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):1-30.
    In recent decades, scholars of Buddhist philosophy have frequently treated the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa, or “Teaching of the Three Natures,” attributed to Vasubandhu, as an authentic and authoritative representation of that celebrated thinker’s mature work within the Yogācāra tradition. However, serious questions may be posed concerning the status and authority of the TSN within Yogācāra, its true authorship, and the relation of its contents to trends in early Yogācāra thought. In the present article, we review the actual state of our knowledge of (...)
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  31.  7
    Sambandha Versus Sambaddhasambandha: The Semantics of Sixth-Triplet Endings.Yūto Kawamura - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):179-192.
    According to the poetician Vāmana, a genitive ending can denote not only a direct relation but also an indirect relation. For example, in kamalasya kandaḥ ‘the bulb of the lotus flower’ the genitive ending Ṅas introduced after the word kamala denotes the indirect relation between the lotus flower and the bulb, the relation established through the intermediary of the lotus plant that has a direct relation with both of them. Is such a view acceptable to Pāṇinian grammarians? Careful scrutiny of (...)
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  32.  6
    The Ground of Knowing: On the Different Modes of Knowing According to the “Great Perfection”.Eran Laish - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):83-112.
    The phenomenon of ‘Knowing’ has a crucial role in Buddhist explanations about the determination of individual realities. According to these explanations particular modes of knowing are connected to specific ways of perceiving and, even, constituting reality. As the ideal state of reality according to Buddhist doctrine is that of an unconditioned liberation, numerous traditions have examined and described the mode of knowing which characterizes such a state. Among these, we find several traditions that related such a mode with a claim (...)
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  33.  11
    Pramāṇa as Action: A New Look at Uddyotakara’s Theory of Knowledge.Jaron Schorr - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):65-82.
    In this paper, I will suggest that the ideas of Uddyotakara, the 6th century author of the Nyāya-Vārttika, may have been largely overlooked as a result of Jitendra Nath Mohanty’s and Bimal Krishna Matilal’s influential works on Indian epistemology. Crucial to Mohanty’s and Matilal’s portrayals of Indian epistemology is the thesis that the pramāṇa theory incorporates a sort of causal theory of knowledge. The writers of pramāṇa-śastra, they argue, agreed that at the end of the day, knowledge comes down to (...)
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  34.  11
    Revisiting Nāgārjuna’s Vigrahavyāvartanī.Ramesh K. Sharma - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):113-151.
    In this paper, I attempt a further elucidation and defense of some of the things I said in my article “Critical Reflections on Nāgārjuna’s Vigrahavyāvartanī” and a response to Professor Claus Oetke’s criticisms :371–394, 2012) of “a number of views which have been propagated” by me in my article. Although some additional issues have been raised, broadly, the themes addressed here are the same three as were the object of my investigation in that paper: namely, Nāgārjuna’s emptiness doctrine; his denial (...)
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