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  1.  5
    Time for Revelation: Unmasking the Anonymity of Blind Reviewers.Govindasamy Agoramoorthy - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):313-315.
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  2.  3
    Online-Based Approaches to Identify Real Journals and Publishers From Hijacked Ones.Amin Asadi, Nader Rahbar, Meisam Asadi, Fahime Asadi & Kokab Khalili Paji - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):305-308.
    The aim of the present paper was to introduce some online-based approaches to evaluate scientific journals and publishers and to differentiate them from the hijacked ones, regardless of their disciplines. With the advent of open-access journals, many hijacked journals and publishers have deceitfully assumed the mantle of authenticity in order to take advantage of researchers and students. Although these hijacked journals and publishers can be identified through checking their advertisement techniques and their websites, these ways do not always result in (...)
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  3.  4
    Chinese and Iranian Scientific Publications: Fast Growth and Poor Ethics.Behzad Ataie-Ashtiani - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):317-319.
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  4.  8
    Definitions and Conceptual Dimensions of Responsible Research and Innovation: A Literature Review.Mirjam Burget, Emanuele Bardone & Margus Pedaste - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):1-19.
    The aim of this study is to provide a discussion on the definitions and conceptual dimensions of Responsible Research and Innovation based on findings from the literature. In the study, the outcomes of a literature review of 235 RRI-related articles were presented. The articles were selected from the EBSCO and Google Scholar databases regarding the definitions and dimensions of RRI. The results of the study indicated that while administrative definitions were widely quoted in the reviewed literature, they were not substantially (...)
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  5. Will Life Be Worth Living in a World Without Work? Technological Unemployment and the Meaning of Life.John Danaher - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):41-64.
    Suppose we are about to enter an era of increasing technological unemployment. What implications does this have for society? Two distinct ethical/social issues would seem to arise. The first is one of distributive justice: how will the efficiency gains from automated labour be distributed through society? The second is one of personal fulfillment and meaning: if people no longer have to work, what will they do with their lives? In this article, I set aside the first issue and focus on (...)
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  6.  10
    Relevant Information and Informed Consent in Research: In Defense of the Subjective Standard of Disclosure.Vilius Dranseika, Jan Piasecki & Marcin Waligora - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):215-225.
    In this article, we seek to contribute to the debate on the requirement of disclosure in the context of informed consent for research. We defend the subjective standard of disclosure and describe ways to implement this standard in research practice. We claim that the researcher should make an effort to find out what kinds of information are likely to be relevant for those consenting to research. This invites researchers to take empirical survey information seriously, attempt to understand the cultural context, (...)
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  7.  4
    A Mobilising Concept? Unpacking Academic Representations of Responsible Research and Innovation.E. Ribeiro Barbara, D. J. Smith Robert & Millar Kate - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):81-103.
    This paper makes a plea for more reflexive attempts to develop and anchor the emerging concept of responsible research and innovation. RRI has recently emerged as a buzzword in science policy, becoming a focus of concerted experimentation in many academic circles. Its performative capacity means that it is able to mobilise resources and spaces despite no common understanding of what it is or should be ‘made of’. In order to support reflection and practice amongst those who are interested in and (...)
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  8.  3
    A Gendered Approach to Science Ethics for US and UK Physicists.Elaine Howard Ecklund & Di Di - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):183-201.
    Some research indicates that women professionals—when compared to men—may be more ethical in the workplace. Existing literature that discusses gender and ethics is confined to the for-profit business sector and primarily to a US context. In particular, there is little attention paid to gender and ethics in science professions in a global context. This represents a significant gap, as science is a rapidly growing and global professional sector, as well as one with ethically ambiguous areas. Adopting an international comparative perspective, (...)
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  9.  6
    The Ethics of Doing Ethics.Sven Ove Hansson - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):105-120.
    Ethicists have investigated ethical problems in other disciplines, but there has not been much discussion of the ethics of their own activities. Research in ethics has many ethical problems in common with other areas of research, and it also has problems of its own. The researcher’s integrity is more precarious than in most other disciplines, and therefore even stronger procedural checks are needed to protect it. The promotion of some standpoints in ethical issues may be socially harmful, and even our (...)
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  10.  3
    Coding Ethical Decision-Making in Research.David J. Hartmann, Thomas Van Valey & Wayne Fuqua - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):121-146.
    This paper presents methods and challenges attendant on the use of protocol analysis to develop a model of heuristic processing applied to research ethics. Participants are exposed to ethically complex scenarios and asked to verbalize their thoughts as they formulate a requested decision. The model identifies functional parts of the decision-making task: interpretation, retrieval, judgment and editing and seeks to reliably code participant verbalizations to those tasks as well as to a set of cognitive tools generally useful in such work. (...)
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  11.  6
    Assessing Freshman Engineering Students’ Understanding of Ethical Behavior.M. Henslee Amber, L. Murray Susan, R. Olbricht Gayla, K. Ludlow Douglas, E. Hays Malcolm & M. Nelson Hannah - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):287-304.
    Academic dishonesty, including cheating and plagiarism, is on the rise in colleges, particularly among engineering students. While students decide to engage in these behaviors for many different reasons, academic integrity training can help improve their understanding of ethical decision making. The two studies outlined in this paper assess the effectiveness of an online module in increasing academic integrity among first semester engineering students. Study 1 tested the effectiveness of an academic honesty tutorial by using a between groups design with a (...)
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  12.  7
    Ethics: An Indispensable Dimension in the University Rankings.Khaki Sedigh Ali - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):65-80.
    University ranking systems attempt to provide an ordinal gauge to make an expert evaluation of the university’s performance for a general audience. University rankings have always had their pros and cons in the higher education community. Some seriously question the usefulness, accuracy, and lack of consensus in ranking systems and therefore multidimensional ranking systems have been proposed to overcome some shortcomings of the earlier systems. Although the present ranking results may rather be rough, they are the only available sources that (...)
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  13.  4
    Consented Autopsy and the Middle-East.Magdy A. Kharoshah, Syed Ather Hussain, Mohammed Madadin & Ritesh G. Menezes - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):321-322.
    Consented autopsy is almost non-existent in the Middle-East where established social and cultural beliefs regarding the procedure might discourage family members from requesting a consented autopsy. Evidence suggests that new information is obtained from consented autopsies. It would not be in the best interest of medicine if social and cultural misconceptions succeed in erasing the existence of consented autopsies entirely.
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  14.  8
    Strategies for Teaching Professional Ethics to IT Engineering Degree Students and Evaluating the Result.Rafael Miñano, Ángel Uruburu, Ana Moreno-Romero & Diego Pérez-López - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):263-286.
    This paper presents an experience in developing professional ethics by an approach that integrates knowledge, teaching methodologies and assessment coherently. It has been implemented for students in both the Software Engineering and Computer Engineering degree programs of the Technical University of Madrid, in which professional ethics is studied as a part of a required course. Our contribution of this paper is a model for formative assessment that clarifies the learning goals, enhances the results, simplifies the scoring and can be replicated (...)
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  15.  8
    Developing a Scientific Virtue-Based Approach to Science Ethics Training.Robert T. Pennock & Michael O’Rourke - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):243-262.
    Responsible conduct of research training typically includes only a subset of the issues that ought to be included in science ethics and sometimes makes ethics appear to be a set of externally imposed rules rather than something intrinsic to scientific practice. A new approach to science ethics training based upon Pennock’s notion of the scientific virtues may help avoid such problems. This paper motivates and describes three implementations—theory-centered, exemplar-centered, and concept-centered—that we have developed in courses and workshops to introduce students (...)
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  16.  3
    Research Misconduct in the Croatian Scientific Community: A Survey Assessing the Forms and Characteristics of Research Misconduct.Vanja Pupovac, Snježana Prijić-Samaržija & Mladen Petrovečki - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):165-181.
    The prevalence and characteristics of research misconduct have mainly been studied in highly developed countries. In moderately or poorly developed countries such as Croatia, data on research misconduct are scarce. The primary aim of this study was to determine the rates at which scientists report committing or observing the most serious forms of research misconduct, such as falsification, fabrication, plagiarism, and violation of authorship rules in the Croatian scientific community. Additionally, we sought to determine the degree of development and the (...)
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  17.  4
    Bribery and Its Ethical Implications for Aid Workers in the Developing World.J. Scott Remer - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):227-241.
    Bribery is a complicated, multi-dimensional issue. Upon first glance, most westerners would immediately condemn it as an underhanded, unfair means of gaining an advantage in a competitive or legal situation, and so it is in virtually every case in the westernized world. However, the issue becomes much more complicated in the international context, particularly in developing nations, where giving and accepting bribes is often normal and expected. This paper serves to inform ethical decision-making in situations where the “right choice” is (...)
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  18.  4
    Aware, Yet Ignorant: Exploring the Views of Early Career Researchers About Funding and Conflicts of Interests in Science.Meghnaa Tallapragada, Gina M. Eosco & Katherine A. McComas - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):147-164.
    This study investigates the level of awareness about funding influences and potential conflicts of interests among early career researchers. The sample for this study included users of one or more of the 14 U.S. laboratories associated with the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network. To be eligible, respondents must have been either still completing graduate work or <5 years since graduation. In total, 713 early career researchers completed the web survey, with about half still in graduate school. Results indicate that although respondents (...)
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  19.  4
    Patients’ Awareness About Their Rights: A Study From Coastal South India.Bhaskaran Unnikrishnan, Divya Trivedi, Tanuj Kanchan, Thapar Rekha, Prasanna Mithra, Nithin Kumar, Vaman Kulkarni, Ramesh Holla & Mishaal Talish - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):203-214.
    Respecting patients’ rights is a fundamental aspect of providing quality healthcare. The present investigation attempts to explore the awareness among patients about their rights in a coastal township in India. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was carried out among 215 patients admitted to the wards of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mangalore. Awareness among patients regarding their rights varied for various issues and ranged between 48.4 and 87.4 %. Awareness about patients’ rights was independent of gender, socio-economic and educational status. (...)
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  20.  8
    Responses of Authors Accused of Plagiarism by Journal Editors.Somsri Wiwanitkit & Viroj Wiwanitkit - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):309-311.
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  21. Publishers: Save Authors' Time.K. Moustafa - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics:1-2.
    Scientific journals ask authors to put their manuscripts, at the submission stage, sometimes in a complex style and a specific pagination format that are time consuming while it is unclear yet that the submitted manuscripts will be accepted. In the case of rejections, authors need to submit to another journal most likely with a different style and formatting that require additional work and time. To save authors’ time, publishers should allow authors to submit their manuscripts in any format and to (...)
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  22.  1
    Publishers_Save Authors' Time.Khaled Moustafa - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics (naa):1-2.
    Scientific journals ask authors to put their manuscripts, at the submission stage, sometimes in a complex style and a specific pagination format that are time consuming while it is unclear yet that the submitted manuscripts will be accepted. In the case of rejections, authors need to submit to another journal most likely with a different style and formatting that require additional work and time. To save authors’ time, publishers should allow authors to submit their manuscripts in any format and to (...)
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