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  1. Continuing Medical Education: A Cross Sectional Study on a Developing Country’s Perspective.Syed Arsalan Ali, Shaikh Hamiz ul Fawwad, Gulrayz Ahmed, Sumayya Naz, Syeda Aimen Waqar & Anam Hareem - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):251-260.
    To determine the attitude of general practitioners towards continuing medical education and reasons motivating or hindering them from attending CME procedures, we conducted a cross-sectional survey from November 2013 to April 2014 in Karachi. Three hundred general practitioners who possessed a medical license for practice in Pakistan filled a pre-designed questionnaire consisting of questions pertaining to attitudes towards CME. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS v16.0. 70.3% of the participants were males. Mean age was 47.75 ± 9.47 years. Only (...)
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  2.  5
    Who Discovered the Binary System and Arithmetic? Did Leibniz Plagiarize Caramuel?J. Ares, J. Lara, D. Lizcano & M. A. Martínez - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):173-188.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz is the self-proclaimed inventor of the binary system and is considered as such by most historians of mathematics and/or mathematicians. Really though, we owe the groundwork of today’s computing not to Leibniz but to the Englishman Thomas Harriot and the Spaniard Juan Caramuel de Lobkowitz, whom Leibniz plagiarized. This plagiarism has been identified on the basis of several facts: Caramuel’s work on the binary system is earlier than Leibniz’s, Leibniz was acquainted—both directly and indirectly—with Caramuel’s work and (...)
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  3. A Unique Historical Case to Understand the Present Sustainable Development.Barona Astrid, Etxebarria Begoña, Aleksanyan Aida, Gallastegui Gorka, Rojo Naiara & Diaz-Tena Estibaliz - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):261-274.
    Every innovation seeks to become a profitable business, with this considered to be the engine for economic prosperity. When an innovation is revolutionary, its long-term consequences can be revolutionary too. The Haber-Bosh process for ammonia synthesis is arguably the twentieth century’s most significant innovation, and its importance to global food production and its impact on the environment are not expected to diminish over the coming decades. The historical case of the ammonia synthesis process invented by Fritz Haber and the ensuing (...)
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  4.  2
    Reflection on the Fazlul Sarkar Versus PubPeer Case.Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):323-325.
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  5.  2
    Should Authors Be Requested to Suggest Peer Reviewers?Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva & Aceil Al-Khatib - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):275-285.
    As part of a continuous process to explore the factors that might weaken or corrupt traditional peer review, in this paper, we query the ethics, fairness and validity of the request, by editors, of authors to suggest peer reviewers during the submission process. One of the reasons for the current crisis in science pertains to a loss in trust as a result of a flawed peer review which is by nature biased unless it is open peer review. As we indicate, (...)
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  6.  5
    Clarivate Analytics: Continued Omnia Vanitas Impact Factor Culture.Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva & Sylvain Bernès - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):291-297.
    This opinion paper takes aim at an error made recently by Clarivate Analytics in which it sent out an email that congratulated academics for becoming exclusive members of academia’s most cited elite, the Highly Cited Researchers. However, that email was sent out to an undisclosed number of non-HCRs, who were offered an apology shortly after, through a bulk mail, which tried to down-play the importance of the error, all the while praising the true HCRs. When Clarivate Analytics senior management was (...)
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  7. Identity Theft in the Academic World Leads to Junk Science.Mehdi Dadkhah, Mohammad Lagzian & Glenn Borchardt - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):287-290.
    In recent years, identity theft has been growing in the academic world. Cybercriminals create fake profiles for prominent scientists in attempts to manipulate the review and publishing process. Without permission, some fraudulent journals use the names of standout researchers on their editorial boards in the effort to look legitimate. This opinion piece, highlights some of the usual types of identity theft and their role in spreading junk science. Some general guidelines that editors and researchers can use against such attacks are (...)
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  8.  2
    Organizing a Collaborative Development of Technological Design Requirements Using a Constructive Dialogue on Value Profiles: A Case in Automated Vehicle Development.M. Flipse Steven & Puylaert Steven - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):49-72.
    Following societal and policy pressures for responsible innovation, innovators are more and more expected to consider the broader socio-ethical context of their work, and more importantly, to integrate such considerations into their daily practices. This may require the involvement of ‘outsiders’ in innovation trajectories, including e.g. societal and governmental actors. However, methods on how to functionally organize such integration in light of responsible innovation have only recently started to emerge. We present an approach to do just that, in which we (...)
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  9.  5
    Who, What and Where Problems in Scientific Communities.Hong Gao, Wei Liu & Jinlan Nie - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):327-330.
    The results of the National Higher Education Entrance Examination have a life-long effect on most Chinese by labeling them clever or not. Some of the following rules of the Gaokao enhance the damage, for example, the rule of Who, What and Where. In general, Who you are and What you have done are of secondary importance, but Where you graduated from, especially the college of first-record is the most important, but discriminatory criterion in the recruitment courses of most of scientific (...)
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  10.  8
    Print Me an Organ? Ethical and Regulatory Issues Emerging From 3D Bioprinting in Medicine.Frederic Gilbert, Cathal D. O’Connell, Tajanka Mladenovska & Susan Dodds - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):73-91.
    Recent developments of three-dimensional printing of biomaterials in medicine have been portrayed as demonstrating the potential to transform some medical treatments, including providing new responses to organ damage or organ failure. However, beyond the hype and before 3D bioprinted organs are ready to be transplanted into humans, several important ethical concerns and regulatory questions need to be addressed. This article starts by raising general ethical concerns associated with the use of bioprinting in medicine, then it focuses on more particular ethical (...)
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  11.  4
    Doing the Right Thing: A Qualitative Investigation of Retractions Due to Unintentional Error.Mohammad Hosseini, Medard Hilhorst, Inez de Beaufort & Daniele Fanelli - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):189-206.
    Retractions solicited by authors following the discovery of an unintentional error—what we henceforth call a “self-retraction”—are a new phenomenon of growing importance, about which very little is known. Here we present results of a small qualitative study aimed at gaining preliminary insights about circumstances, motivations and beliefs that accompanied the experience of a self-retraction. We identified retraction notes that unambiguously reported an honest error and that had been published between the years 2010 and 2015. We limited our sample to retractions (...)
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  12.  2
    Ethical Concerns About Human Genetic Enhancement in the Malay Science Fiction Novels.Isa Noor Munirah & Shuri Muhammad Fakhruddin Hj Safian - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):109-127.
    Advancements in science and technology have not only brought hope to humankind to produce disease-free offspring, but also offer possibilities to genetically enhance the next generation’s traits and capacities. Human genetic enhancement, however, raises complex ethical questions, such as to what extent should it be allowed? It has been a great challenge for humankind to develop robust ethical guidelines for human genetic enhancement that address both public concerns and needs. We believe that research about public concerns is necessary prior to (...)
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  13. The Strength of Ethical Matrixes as a Tool for Normative Analysis Related to Technological Choices: The Case of Geological Disposal for Radioactive Waste.Céline Kermisch & Christophe Depaus - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):29-48.
    The ethical matrix is a participatory tool designed to structure ethical reflection about the design, the introduction, the development or the use of technologies. Its collective implementation, in the context of participatory decision-making, has shown its potential usefulness. On the contrary, its implementation by a single researcher has not been thoroughly analyzed. The aim of this paper is precisely to assess the strength of ethical matrixes implemented by a single researcher as a tool for conceptual normative analysis related to technological (...)
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  14.  2
    America COMPETES at 5 Years: An Analysis of Research-Intensive Universities’ RCR Training Plans.Trisha Phillips, Franchesca Nestor, Gillian Beach & Elizabeth Heitman - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):227-249.
    This project evaluates the impact of the National Science Foundation's policy to promote education in the responsible conduct of research. To determine whether this policy resulted in meaningful RCR educational experiences, our study examined the instructional plans developed by individual universities in response to the mandate. Using a sample of 108 U.S. institutions classified as Carnegie “very high research activity”, we analyzed all publicly available NSF RCR training plans in light of the consensus best practices in RCR education that were (...)
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  15.  8
    Questionable, Objectionable or Criminal? Public Opinion on Data Fraud and Selective Reporting in Science.Justin T. Pickett & Sean Patrick Roche - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):151-171.
    Data fraud and selective reporting both present serious threats to the credibility of science. However, there remains considerable disagreement among scientists about how best to sanction data fraud, and about the ethicality of selective reporting. The public is arguably the largest stakeholder in the reproducibility of science; research is primarily paid for with public funds, and flawed science threatens the public’s welfare. Members of the public are able to make meaningful judgments about the morality of different behaviors using moral intuitions. (...)
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  16.  2
    Mentoring for Responsible Research: The Creation of a Curriculum for Faculty to Teach RCR in the Research Environment.Dena K. Plemmons & Michael W. Kalichman - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):207-226.
    Despite more than 25 years of a requirement for training in the responsible conduct of research, there is still little consensus about what such training should include, how it should be delivered, nor what constitutes “effectiveness” of such training. This lack of consensus on content, approaches and outcomes is evident in recent data showing high variability in the development and implementation of RCR instruction across universities and programs. If we accept that one of the primary aims of instruction in RCR/research (...)
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  17.  1
    Patient Autonomy and Quality of Care in Telehealthcare.Giovanni Rubeis, Maximilian Schochow & Florian Steger - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):93-107.
    Telemedicine is a complex field including various applications and target groups. Especially telehealthcare is seen by many as a means to revolutionize medicine. It gives patients the opportunity to take charge of their own health by using self-tracking devices and allows health professionals to treat patients from a distance. To some, this means an empowerment of patient autonomy as well as an improvement in the quality of care. Others state the dangers of depersonalization of medicine and the pathologization of daily (...)
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  18.  3
    Ethical Implications of User Perceptions of Wearable Devices.L. H. Segura Anaya, Abeer Alsadoon, N. Costadopoulos & P. W. C. Prasad - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):1-28.
    Health Wearable Devices enhance the quality of life, promote positive lifestyle changes and save time and money in medical appointments. However, Wearable Devices store large amounts of personal information that is accessed by third parties without user consent. This creates ethical issues regarding privacy, security and informed consent. This paper aims to demonstrate users’ ethical perceptions of the use of Wearable Devices in the health sector. The impact of ethics is determined by an online survey which was conducted from patients (...)
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  19.  1
    Using Surplus Embryos and Research Embryos in Stem Cell Research: Ethical Viewpoints of Buddhist, Hindu and Catholic Leaders in Malaysia on the Permissibility of Research.Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):129-149.
    The sources of embryos for Embryonic Stem Cell Research include surplus embryos from infertility treatments, and research embryos which are created solely for an ESCR purpose. The latter raises more ethical concerns. In a multi-religious country like Malaysia, ethical discussions on the permissibility of ESCR with regard to the use surplus and research embryos are diversified. Malaysia has formulated guidelines influenced by the national fatwa ruling which allows the use of surplus embryos in ESCR. Input from other main religions is (...)
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  20.  1
    Business Ethics for Mobile Network Operators.Shahryar Sorooshian - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):333-334.
    The letter is highlighting a case of Business Ethics for Mobile Network Operators based on the recent news.
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  21.  2
    Molecular Tumor Boards: Ethical Issues in the New Era of Data Medicine.Henri-Corto Stoeklé, Marie-France Mamzer-Bruneel, Charles-Henry Frouart, Christophe Le Tourneau, Pierre Laurent-Puig, Guillaume Vogt & Christian Hervé - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):307-322.
    The practice and development of modern medicine requires large amounts of data, particularly in the domain of cancer. The future of personalized medicine lies neither with “genomic medicine” nor with “precision medicine”, but with “data medicine”. The establishment of this DM has required far-reaching changes, to establish four essential elements connecting patients and doctors: biobanks, databases, bioinformatic platforms and genomic platforms. The “transformation” of scientific research areas, such as genetics, bioinformatics and biostatistics, into clinical specialties has generated a new vision (...)
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  22.  1
    Economic, Environmental and Moral Acceptance of Renewable Energy: A Case Study—The Agricultural Biogas Plant at Pěčín.Marek Vochozka, Anna Maroušková & Petr Šuleř - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):299-305.
    The production of renewable energy in agricultural biogas plants is being widely criticized because—among other things—most of the feedstock comes from purpose-grown crops like maize. These activities generate competitive pressure to other crops that are used for feeding or food production, worsening their affordability. Unique pretreatment technology that allows substitution of the purpose-grown crops by farming residues was built 6 years ago on a commercial basis in Pěčín under modest funding and without publicity. The design of the concept; financial assessment (...)
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  23. Effect of Unprofessional Supervision on Durability of Buildings.Javad Yahaghi - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):331-332.
    The durability of buildings which depends on the nature of the supervisory system used in their construction is an important feature of the construction industry. This article tries to draw the readers’ attention to the effect of untrained and unprofessional building supervisors and their unethical performance on the durability of buildings.
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