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  1.  1
    “Et Lacrymatus Est Jesus”.Johannes Brachtendorf - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):225-245.
    Although the doctrine of the affections constitutes an essential part of both psychology and ethics for Classical Greek philosophy, the passion of sorrow was seldom discussed. The Bible, by contrast, frequently mentions the feeling of sorrow, and Christianity, unlike Stoic ethical ideals, assigns sorrow a positive significance—at least to a degree.While it is true that the Gospels generally prefer to paint a picture of Christ as a quiet teacher and master, a few pericopes—especially within the Gospel of John—narrate the sorrow (...)
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  2.  1
    Human Agency in Augustine’s Doctrine of Predestination and Perseverance.J. Patout Burns - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):45-71.
    Augustine’s two-stage explanation of the creation of the universe provided a basis for understanding the divine operations that activated the potentialities of angels and humans by which they attained stable beatitude. God caused their activities of knowing and loving rather than endowing them with natural capacities for the divine. In this context, Augustine’s analysis of the success of the angels as well as the failure of the demons and the first humans clarified the limits of the agency of spiritual creatures (...)
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  3. Augustine and John’s Gospel From Conversion to Confessiones.Cameron Michael - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):263-278.
    How did John’s Gospel draw and compel Augustine before and during the composition of Confessiones? Analyzing references to John in Augustine’s works from his embrace of Nicene Christianity to the writing of Confessiones, this paper finds a growing emphasis on the importance of Christ’s humanity. Augustine strategically invokes two texts in Confessiones’ crucial seventh book: John 1:14, “the Word was made flesh,” and John 14:6, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” This paper considers three features: First, how (...)
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  4. Reconsidering Augustine on Marriage and Concupiscence.John C. Cavadini - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):183-199.
    In the spirit of Augustine’s own “Reconsiderations,” and inspired by Peter Brown’s act of “reconsidering” in the Epilogue to Augustine of Hippo, this essay offers a reconsideration of Augustine’s work On Marriage and Concupiscence. Key to the reconsideration of this text is a reconsideration of the role of the “sacrament” of marriage in Augustine’s articulation and defense of the goods of marriage and of human sexuality. For Augustine, Julian’s advocacy of concupiscence as an innocent natural desire amounts to a dangerous (...)
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  5. Vt Tecum Tamquam Mecum Audeam Conloqui.Catherine Conybeare - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):105-117.
    This paper reads the surviving letters written by Augustine during the period between his return to North Africa in 388 and his elevation to the bishopric of Hippo in 395. In doing so, it explores Augustine’s complicated relationship with his native land and his new Christian role there, and with the career and associates that he has left behind; and it reveals some of the pressures inherent in the notion of “coming home.”.
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  6. Augustine’s Moral Psychology.Jesse Couenhoven - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):23-44.
    This essay addresses common misunderstandings about the part of Augustine’s theological anthropology one might call his “moral psychology.” It particularly seeks to distance Augustine’s mature account of human agency from influential faculty psychologies. I argue that it is misleading to talk about Augustine’s view of the “will,” given what we typically mean by that term, and that “choice” is not central to Augustine’s account of human freedom. These claims hold not least because of the way Augustine thought about what he (...)
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  7. Christology and Anti-Heretical Strategies in the In Iohannis Euangelium Tractatus.Volker Henning Drecoll - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):247-261.
    Scholars agree that Christology is at the center of the In Iohannis euangelium tractatus. In his exegesis of the Gospel of John, Augustine particularly highlights the human nature of the Incarnated, even as he integrates Trinitarian arguments as a cornerstone of his homiletic teaching. This may have been important for the later reception of Augustine’s Trinitarian thought. Christology is clearly present throughout the various parts of the work. The differences between the parts can be traced to the various contexts in (...)
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  8. Reimagining Human Personhood Within the Body of Christ.Matthew Drever - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):73-91.
    This paper addresses the question of human and divine agency in Augustine’s later writings through the Trinitarian lens that shapes his understanding of salvation and the human person. It focuses on the way Augustine draws on Christological and pneumatological claims to structure the relation between human and divine agency within his totus christus model. Here I examine how the relation between human and divine agency can be grounded on and understood through the predestination of Christ. This leads into a consideration (...)
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  9.  1
    St. Augustine Lecture—2016.Allan D. Fitzgerald - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):3-22.
    This paper asks what led Augustine to begin his commentary on the Gospel of John, linking that decision to his ongoing efforts to heal the Donatist schism by appealing to the centrality of Jesus Christ, both in his own theological vision and in the message to those who were listening to his sermons on the Gospel of John and on the psalms of ascent. This question is particularly important in the aftermath of the Edict of Unity insofar as he was (...)
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  10. Augustine’s Doubts on Divorce.David G. Hunter - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):161-182.
    Augustine’s teaching on the indissolubility of marriage profoundly influenced the Western Christian tradition on the matter of divorce and remarriage. Augustine famously insisted that while divorce was allowed in limited circumstances, remarriage was prohibited for both the guilty and the innocent parties. Less frequently acknowledged is the degree to which Augustine expressed doubt about the validity of his own teaching. In this essay I argue that even though Augustine offered a strict interpretation of the biblical evidence, he did so only (...)
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  11.  3
    Augustine and Republican Liberty.Michael Lamb - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):119-159.
    One of the most controversial aspects of Augustine’s political thought is his use of imperial power to coerce religious dissenters. While scholars have sought to situate Augustine’s justifications of coercion within his historical, social, and political contexts, even the most helpful approaches do not alleviate concerns that Augustine’s defense of coercion violates individual liberty. This paper argues that one reason for this is that many defenders and detractors tend to view Augustine’s defense through a largely liberal lens, assuming a modern (...)
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  12. To Die For.Margaret R. Miles - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):93-103.
    The perennial human need to ground the self in something greater than itself takes many forms. This article explores several values that are often considered worth dying for, from one’s country or religion, to—among the many that are often advocated in contemporary Western societies—one’s sexuality. Given the recent level of interest in Augustine’s early sexuality, I argue that, for Augustine, sex, when compulsively pursued, was a failed value. His experience revealed to him that the ultimate object with which the self (...)
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  13. Augustine’s Anonyma I and Cornelius’s Concubines.Danuta Shanzer - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):201-224.
    This paper explores the relationship between philology and literary criticism and history via two -marital problems drawn from Augustine’s life. The first is historiographical and concerns Augustine’s relations with Anonyma I, his African concubine, who was featured so famously in the Confessiones. My argument, first published in 2002, that Augustine painted his separation from her in the language of Genesis and saw her as a virtual wife, has not found favor with historians. The episode is used as a test case (...)
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  14. A Letter From the Editor.Jonathan P. Yates - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):1-1.
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