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  1.  13
    Sweatshops and Exploitation.Ridhiman Balaji - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (2):117-143.
    The paper examines how theoretical misunderstandings of Karl Marx’s theory of value have affected scholarly debates on sweatshops and labour-exploitation more broadly. Participants to these debates tend to overlook the distinction between the form of value and the substance of value. The paper further analyses problems with an exchange-based conceptualization of the labour-process, adopted by many sweatshop-defenders. Rather than posit Marx’s own perspective as the exclusively correct position, this paper seeks to foster a more informed dialogue on the issue of (...)
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  2.  13
    Automate, Disrupt, and Profit.S. Douglas Beets & Nathan J. Beets - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (2):145-189.
    Few doubt that automation and artificial intelligence will change business and society in the future. Questions arise, however, regarding the motivations associated with such expensive corporation expenditures and the related ethics of the disruption and unemployment that may result from corporation development and installation of sophisticated technology. This study analyzes financial statement data of 100 large public corporations to understand those motivations and their consequences for corporation profitability and employees. The study results indicate that a more automated future may be (...)
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  3.  8
    Integrating Embodied Ethos, Pathos, and Logos for Ethical Practices in Organizations.Wendelin Küpers & Kamel Mnisri - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (2):191-216.
    As a response to the decoupling of the ‘talk’ and the ‘walk’ in organizations regarding claimed goodness and actions, this contribution explores the role of the rhetorical modes of ethos, pathos, and logos as a new form of wise communication to handle timely ethical and societal issues. We develop a criticism of one-sided, often logos-oriented and instrumentalizing, irresponsible and unresponsive approaches taken by organizations in their communication efforts, and then go on to propose a more balanced, proto-wise integration of the (...)
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  4.  12
    Sweatshops, Disrespect, and Interference.Huseyin S. Kuyumcuoglu - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (2):217-241.
    Sweatshop defenders argue that interference in sweatshop conditions through consumer activism or government regulations is morally wrong because, first, such acts harm sweatshop workers, and second, they disrespect these workers. Distinguishing the prohibitive aspects of sweatshop interference as harm on the one hand, and disrespect on the other, these sweatshop defenders build both a consequentialist and a deontological foundation for their argument, respectively. This article crafts a rejoinder to the second foundation of the defenders’ argument. In particular, the article responds (...)
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  5.  17
    Understanding Unprofessional Conduct of Faculty.David E. Desplaces, Laura Beauvais, Avi Kay & Susan Bosco - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (1):1-26.
    Although researchers have paid much attention to the widespread cheating by students during their college careers and the possible sources behind such unethical behaviors, there has been less attention given to the unethical behaviors of faculty. Research on the types of unethical behaviors of faculty has pointed out the unique nature of higher education and the particular pressures placed on faculty as potential drivers of such behavior. In this paper, we examine the factors and underlying cognitive processes that may drive (...)
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  6.  24
    Corporations as Imperfect Communities.Andrés Felipe López Latorre & Ulf Thoene - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (1):83-112.
    This article presents an alternative understanding of corporations from the two problematic visions that see corporations as either the shareholders’ property or as nexuses of contracts. The alternative proposed here is based on the theories of pre-eighteenth-century philosophers, particularly Aristotle’s political philosophy, which Thomas Aquinas later refined. The article aims to advance a theory of corporate legal and moral responsibility for human rights based on the conception of corporations as imperfect communities whose purpose is to produce a good or service (...)
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  7.  18
    Conceptualization and Operationalization of the Concept of Moral Craftsmanship.Anne I. Schaap, H. C. W. de Vet, Margreet M. Stolper & A. C. Molewijk - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (1):27-54.
    Prison work creates ethical challenges for which a training program was initiated for Dutch prison staff to foster their Moral Craftsmanship (MCS). The concept of MCS is not yet defined and operationalized in literature. This explorative study aims to 1) define MCS, 2) identify conceptual elements of MCS, and 3) develop a measurement tool for MCS. A document and literature study provided input for the definition and selection of conceptual elements related within DCIA policy documents, identifying three conceptual levels of (...)
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  8.  23
    Trading In Our Lederhosen for Kilts.Brian K. Steverson, Adriane Leithauser & Tyler Wasson - 2024 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 43 (1):55-82.
    The popularity of direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry services has exploded over the past five years, with as many as 250 direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry testing companies currently operating and estimates that 1 in 5 Americans are customers of one or more of those companies. Marketing of genetic ancestry testing has consistently linked the results of DNA testing to a consumer’s racial and ethnic identity, and, because of that, can help consumers find out “who they really are.” We argue that the “biologization” of (...)
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