Business Ethics Quarterly

ISSN: 1052-150X

15 found

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  1. Hiring, Algorithms, and Choice: Why Interviews Still Matter.Vikram R. Bhargava & Pooria Assadi - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):201-230.
    Why do organizations conduct job interviews? The traditional view of interviewing holds that interviews are conducted, despite their steep costs, to predict a candidate’s future performance and fit. This view faces a twofold threat: the behavioral and algorithmic threats. Specifically, an overwhelming body of behavioral research suggests that we are bad at predicting performance and fit; furthermore, algorithms are already better than us at making these predictions in various domains. If the traditional view captures the whole story, then interviews seem (...)
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  2.  20
    The Nature and Practice of Trust, by Marc Cohen. New York: Routledge, 2023. 148 pp. [REVIEW]Helet Botha - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):365-368.
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  3.  23
    From Trauma to Entertainment: An Examination of Netflix’s Dahmer—Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story Series.Sorin M. S. Krammer - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):369-373.
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  4. Vocabularies of Motive for Corporate Social Responsibility: The Emergence of the Business Case in Germany, 1970–2014.Nora Lohmeyer & Gregory Jackson - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):231-270.
    The business case constitutes an important instrumental motive for corporate social responsibility (CSR), but its relationship with other moral and relational motives remains controversial. In this article, we examine the articulation of motives for CSR among different stakeholders in Germany historically. On the basis of reports of German business associations, state agencies, unions, and nongovernmental organizations from 1970 to 2014, we show how the business case came to be a dominant motive for CSR by acting as a coalition magnet: the (...)
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  5.  27
    Moral Disjunction and Role Coadunation in Business and the Professions.Rita Mota & Alan D. Morrison - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):271-302.
    We consider the problem of moral disjunction in professional and business activities from a virtue-ethical perspective. Moral disjunction arises when the behavioral demands of a role conflict with personal morality; it is an important problem because most people in modern societies occupy several complex roles that can cause this clash to occur. We argue that moral disjunction, and the psychological mechanisms that people use to cope with it, are problematic because they make it hard to pursue virtue and to live (...)
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  6. Corporate Moral Credit.Grant J. Rozeboom - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):303-330.
    When do companies deserve moral credit for doing what is right? This question concerns the positive side of corporate moral responsibility, the negative side of which is the more commonly discussed issue of when companies are blameworthy for doing what is wrong. I offer a broadly functionalist account of how companies can act from morally creditworthy motives, which defuses the following Strawsonian challenge to the claim that they can: morally creditworthy motivation involves being guided by attitudes of “goodwill” for others, (...)
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  7.  28
    When Are Norms Prescriptive? Understanding and Clarifying the Role of Norms in Behavioral Ethics Research.Tobey K. Scharding & Danielle E. Warren - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (2):331-364.
    Research on ethical norms has grown in recent years, but imprecise language has made it unclear when these norms prescribe “what ought to be” and when they merely describe behaviors or perceptions (“what is”). Studies of ethical norms, moreover, tend not to investigate whether participants were influenced by the prescriptive aspect of the norm; the studies primarily demonstrate, rather, that people will mimic the behaviors or perceptions of others, which provides evidence for the already well-substantiated social proof theory. In this (...)
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  8.  19
    Toward a Theory of Marginalized Stakeholder-Centric Entrepreneurship.Rashedur Chowdhury, Saras D. Sarasvathy & R. Edward Freeman - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):1-34.
    The neglect of marginalized stakeholders is a colossal problem in both stakeholder and entrepreneurship streams of literature. To address this problem, we offer a theory of marginalized stakeholder-centric entrepreneurship. We conceptualize how firms can utilize marginalized stakeholder input actualization through which firms should process a variety of ideas, resources, and interactions with marginalized stakeholders and then filter, internalize, and, finally, realize important elements that improve a variety of related socioeconomic, ethical, racial, contextual, political, and identity issues. This input actualization process (...)
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  9.  17
    Organizations as Wrongdoers: From Ontology to Morality, by Stephanie Collins. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2023. 208 pp. [REVIEW]B. V. E. Hyde - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):192-195.
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  10. What’s the Point of Efficiency? On Heath’s Market Failures Approach.Richard Endörfer & Louis Larue - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):35 - 59.
    This article reviews and criticizes Joseph Heath’s market failures approach (MFA) to business ethics. Our criticism is organized into three sections. First, we argue that, even under the ideal assumptions of perfect competition, when markets generate Pareto-efficient distributions, Heath’s approach does not rule out significant harms. Second, we show that, under nonideal conditions, the MFA is either too demanding, if efficiency is to be attained, or not sufficiently demanding, if the goal of Pareto efficiency is abandoned. Finally, we argue that (...)
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  11.  17
    Site-seeing Humanness in Organizations.Tuure Haarjärvi & Sari Laari-Salmela - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):60-96.
    In this study, we theorize humanness in organizations as a property of practice. We apply practice theory to examine how humanness becomes enacted in a business organization as people prioritize organizational and individual ends in their work activities. Our empirical case study examines the everyday interactions of development team members in an R&D organization of a large Nordic cooperative. Challenging the dominant individualist and structuralist approaches in humanness and human dignity studies, we identify and locate four different aspects of humanness (...)
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  12.  13
    Rhythm and resonance in Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s Horizontal Six-channel projected video installation. The Artist and Goodman Gallery, New York, Paris, London, 2011. Experienced at Trapholt, Kolding, Denmark, 2023. 6 minutes. [REVIEW]Eva Pallesen - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):196-199.
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  13.  21
    Ethical Culture in Organizations: A Review and Agenda for Future Research.Achinto Roy, Alexander Newman, Heather Round & Sukanto Bhattacharya - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):97-138.
    We review and synthesize over two decades of research on ethical culture in organizations, examining eighty-nine relevant scholarly works. Our article discusses the conceptualization of ethical culture in a cross-disciplinary space and its critical role in ethical decision-making. With a view to advancing future research, we analyze the antecedents, outcomes, and mediator and moderator roles of ethical culture. To do so, we identify measures and theories used in past studies and make recommendations. We propose, inter alia, the use of validated (...)
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  14.  11
    Can Digitally Transformed Work Be Virtuous?Alejo José G. Sison - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):163-191.
    This essay inquires whether digitally transformed work can be virtuous and under what conditions. It eschews technological determinism in both utopian and dystopian versions, opting for the premise of free human agency. This work is distinctive in adopting an actor-centric and explicitly ethical analysis based on neo-Aristotelian, Catholic social teaching (CST), and MacIntyrean teachings on the virtues. Beginning with an analysis of digital disruption, it identifies the most salient human advantages vis-à-vis technology in digitally transformed work and provides philosophical anthropological (...)
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  15.  26
    Prudent Entrepreneurship in Theory of Moral Sentiments.Kacey Reeves West - 2024 - Business Ethics Quarterly 34 (1):139-162.
    Adam Smith writes favorably about innovation in Wealth of Nations while writing unfavorably about a figure associated with innovation: the projector. His criticism of projectors prompts many scholars to claim that Smith disapproves of entrepreneurship. But Smith criticizes the projector not because he acts as an entrepreneur but because he fails to meet Smith’s moral standards for entrepreneurship. In Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith conceives of a framework for moral entrepreneurship based on prudence. The framework consists of two principles: first, (...)
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