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  1.  2
    Better Business: How the B Corp Movement Is Remaking Capitalism, by Christopher Marquis. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020. 312 Pp. [REVIEW]Raquel Antolín-López - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):348-351.
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  2.  2
    When Managers Become Robin Hoods: A Mixed Method Investigation.Russell Cropanzano, Daniel P. Skarlicki, Thierry Nadisic, Marion Fortin, Phoenix Van Wagoner & Ksenia Keplinger - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):209-242.
    When subordinates have suffered an unfairness, managers sometimes try to compensate them by allocating something extra that belongs to the organization. These reactions, which we label as managerial Robin Hood behaviors, are undertaken without the consent of senior leadership. In four studies, we present and test a theory of managerial Robin Hoodism. In study 1, we found that managers themselves reported engaging in Robin Hoodism for various reasons, including a moral concern with restoring justice. Study 2 results suggested that managerial (...)
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  3.  3
    Corporate Responsibility for Wealth Creation and Human Rights, by Georges Enderle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021. 332 Pp. [REVIEW]Marcos Paulo de Lucca-Silveira - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):352-355.
  4.  3
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Government: The Role of Discretion for Engagement with Public Policy.Jette Steen Knudsen & Jeremy Moon - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):243-271.
    We investigate the relationship of corporate social responsibility and government. We distinguish two broad perspectives on the CSR and government relationship: the dichotomous and the related. Using typologies of CSR public policy and of CSR and the law, we present an integrated framework for corporate discretion for engagement with public policy for CSR. We make four related contributions. First, we explain the dichotomous and the related perspectives with reference to their various assumptions and analyses. Second, we demonstrate that public policy (...)
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  5.  1
    Evidence of an Inverted U–Shaped Relationship Between Stakeholder Management Performance Variation and Firm Performance.André O. Laplume, Jeffrey S. Harrison, Zhou Zhang, Xin Yu & Kent Walker - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):272-298.
    Empirical research is largely supportive of the assertion of instrumental stakeholder theory that a positive relationship exists between “managing for stakeholders” and firm performance. However, despite considerable debate on the subject, the amount of variation across firm investments in stakeholders has not been adequately investigated. We address this gap using a sample of more than eighteen thousand firm-level observations over ten years. We find evidence to support an inverted U–shaped relationship between variation in stakeholder management performance and Tobin’s q, suggesting (...)
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  6. The Ethics of Alternative Currencies.Louis Larue, Camille Meyer, Marek Hudon & Joakim Sandberg - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):299 - 321.
    Alternative currencies are means of payment that circulate alongside—as an alternative or complement to—official currencies. While these currencies have existed for a long time, both society and academia have shown a renewed interest in their potential to decentralize the governance of monetary affairs and to bring people and organizations together in more ethical or sustainable ways. This article is a review of the ethical and philosophical implications of these alternative monetary projects. We first discuss various classifications of these currencies before (...)
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  7.  2
    Relationships, Authority, and Reasons: A Second-Personal Account of Corporate Moral Agency.Alan D. Morrison, Rita Mota & William J. Wilhelm - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):322-347.
    We present a second-personal account of corporate moral agency. This approach is in contrast to the first-personal approach adopted in much of the existing literature, which concentrates on the corporation’s ability to identify moral reasons for itself. Our account treats relationships and communications as the fundamental building blocks of moral agency. The second-personal account rests on a framework developed by Darwall. Its central requirement is that corporations be capable of recognizing the authority relations that they have with other moral agents. (...)
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  8.  1
    Editorial Musings on What Makes the Blood Flow in Business Ethics Research.Frank den Hond & Mollie Painter - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):1-11.
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  9.  8
    Crisis Prices: The Ethics of Market Controls During a Global Pandemic.Kobi Finestone & Ewan Kingston - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):12-40.
    SARS-CoV-2 has unleashed an unprecedented global crisis that has caused the demand for essential goods, such as medical and sanitation products, to soar while simultaneously disrupting the very supply chains that allow individuals and institutions to obtain those essential goods. This has resulted in stark price increases and accusations of price gouging. We survey the existing philosophical literature that examines price gouging and identify the key arguments for regulators permitting such behavior and for regulators restricting such behavior. We demonstrate how (...)
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  10.  21
    Why a Right to an Explanation of Algorithmic Decision-Making Should Exist: A Trust-Based Approach.Tae Wan Kim & Bryan R. Routledge - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):75-102.
    Businesses increasingly rely on algorithms that are data-trained sets of decision rules and implement decisions with little or no human intermediation. In this article, we provide a philosophical foundation for the claim that algorithmic decision-making gives rise to a “right to explanation.” It is often said that, in the digital era, informed consent is dead. This negative view originates from a rigid understanding that presumes informed consent is a static and complete transaction. Such a view is insufficient, especially when data (...)
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  11.  4
    The Attributional–Counterfactual Theory of Need: Integrating Theories to Predict Need Norm Use.Joseph T. Liu & Maria J. Mendez - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):103-135.
    The justice literature has coalesced around the notion that actors tend to utilize the norm of equity for resource allocation decisions because it is generally considered most fair when employees who contribute more to the organization receive more resources. Yet, actors might sometimes utilize a need norm to allocate resources to those most in need. Studies that have addressed need-based resource allocations have assumed a relatively straightforward conceptualization of need. However, research from related areas suggests that multiple characteristics of the (...)
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  12.  61
    The Code of Capital: How the Law Creates Wealth and Inequality. [REVIEW]Thomas Mulligan - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):199-202.
    A review of Katharina Pistor's *The Code of Capital: How the Law Creates Wealth and Inequality* (2019, Princeton University Press).
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  13.  2
    Divested: Inequality in the Age of Finance, by Ken-Hou Lin and Megan Tobias Neely. New York: Oxford University Press, 2020. 232 Pp. [REVIEW]Kenneth Silver - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):203-207.
  14.  2
    Pandemics at Work: Convergence of Epidemiology and Ethics.Michele Thornton & William “Marty” Martin - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):41-74.
    Like COVID-19, new infectious disease outbreaks emerge almost annually, and studies predict that this trend will continue due to a variety of factors, including an aging population, ease of travel, and globalization of the economy. In response to episodic public health crises, governments and organizations develop, implement, and enforce policies, procedures, protocols, and programs. The epidemiological triad is both a model of disease causation and fundamentally used to design and deploy such control measures. Here we adapt this model to the (...)
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  15. Let’s Clean Up and Bring Some Order Here! Moral Regulation of Markets in Yaoundé, Cameroon.Aurélie Toivonen & Ignasi Martí - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):136-168.
    This study examines activities and processes through which projects of moral regulation are implemented as well as lived, transformed, and resisted by their targeted actors. Our ethnographic study focuses on discourses and practices of civic duty for orderly and hygienic conduct in the rehabilitation of marketplaces in Yaoundé, Cameroon. By drawing on the inhabited institutions approach and the literature on ethics as practice, our analysis extends research on moral work to put forward a perspective on moral regulation as a situated (...)
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  16.  3
    “Woke” Corporations and the Stigmatization of Corporate Social Initiatives.Danielle E. Warren - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):169-198.
    Recent corporate social initiatives have garnered criticisms from a wide range of audiences due to perceived inconsistencies. Some critics use the label “woke” when CSIs are perceived as inconsistent with the firm’s purpose. Other critics use the label “woke washing” when CSIs are perceived as inconsistent with the firm’s practices or values. I will argue that this derogatory use of woke is stigmatizing, leads to claims of hypocrisy, and can cause stakeholder backlash. I connect this process to our own field (...)
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  17.  2
    Overlooked Thinkers: Stretching the Boundaries of Business Ethics Scholarship (Guest Editors’ Introduction) – Corrigendum.Andrew Wicks, Lindsay Thompson, Patricia Werhane & Norman Bowie - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):208-208.
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