Year:

  1.  6
    Nothing Really Matters.Samantha Clark - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):327-346.
    Arguments set out by Timothy Morton, Ted Toadvine, and J. Baird Callicott et al. suggest that the remedy to the dualistic account that places “human” in binary opposition to “nature” is not to deny difference, but to understand the process of differentiation in a way that recognizes our interdependence, and yet still leaves space for the unknowable “Otherness” of nature. Callicott et al. argue that Aldo Leopold’s land ethic authentically recognizes the difference and freedom of wild animal Others, arguing that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    The Case for Casuistry in Environmental Ethics.J. Erickson Debra - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):287-305.
    Casuistry, or case-based reasoning, should be used in environmental ethics. Casuistry came to prominence during the transition from medieval to modern, when historical circumstances challenged settled moral perspectives. Similarly, environmental ethics arose in response to real-life dilemmas that also challenged existing moral theories. Casuistry’s focus on cases means that it can resolve individual environmental dilemmas without needing to solve every other problem in the field. It is a “taxonomic” form of moral reasoning that operates by analogy to paradigm cases, appeals (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Global Distributive Justice.Ezra Ovadia - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):367-378.
    The environmental crisis in general, especially the problem of global warming, as well as the poverty and distress that a large part of the world experiences, demands a solution in terms of global distributive justice. This solution should focus on greenhouse emissions into the atmosphere throughout the world. If developed countries think that they have the right to do whatever they like with regard to the natural resources that are within their territories which then affect global greenhouse emissions, then developing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    Emplotting Virtue: A Narrative Approach to Environmental Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW]Andrea R. Gammon - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):379-382.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  2
    Environmental Pragmatism, Community Values, and the Problem of Reprehensible Implications.Mark Michael - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):347-366.
    Environmental pragmatists such as Bryan Norton and Ben Minteer argue that environmental philosophers should look to the values of real people and communities to determine which environmental policies and legislation should be put into place. But they want to avoid a kind of simplistic relativism, since that view entails all sorts of reprehensible conclusions about what is right and wrong and what is valuable, both generally and with respect to the environment. Their solution is to distinguish between the community’s surface (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  4
    Leopold’s Land Ethic in the Sundarbans.Paul Kalpita Bhar & Baindur Meera - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):307-325.
    Leopold’s land ethic is a watershed event in environmental ethics as it is the first one to provide an alternative conceptualization of land to transcend its “Abrahamic conception.” However, if Leopold had employed phenomenological methods to formulate his land ethic, then his conceptualization of land and the understanding of its relation with its dwellers could have been more nuanced. From an analysis of the Sundarbans islanders’ phenomenological accounts of land, collected during a field study, it can be shown that phenomenological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Imprudence and Intergenerational Injustice.Schaefer Jame - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):259-286.
    Despite the U.S. government’s failure to isolate from the biosphere the highly radioactive spent fuel that has been accumulating at nuclear power plants for sixty years, some governmental officials, scientists, nuclear industrialists, and environmentalists are urging increased reliance on nuclear-generated electricity as part of the strategy to mitigate global warming. An ethical analysis of their proposal is warranted, and one promising approach is the theologically grounded process of making prudent decisions like those that Thomas Aquinas outlined and explained in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  1
    The Wisdom of Frugality: Why Less is More—More or Less. [REVIEW]Brian Treanor - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (3):383-384.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  6
    Nature’s Trust: An Environmental Law for A New Ecological Age.Donald A. Brown - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):245-248.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  7
    Environmental Ontology in Deep Ecology and Mahayana Buddhism.Chin-Fa Cheng - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):145-163.
  11.  1
    Anne Frank’s Tree: Nature’s Confrontation with Technology, Domination, and the Holocaust.Roger S. Gottlieb - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):229-232.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  4
    Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy.Lauren Hartzell-Nichols - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):233-236.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  10
    Habermas on Nature.Yogi Hale Hendlin & Konrad Ott - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):183-208.
    Environmental ethicists typically consider Jürgen Habermas’s theory of communicative action to exclude moral consideration for nonhuman animals. Habermas's early work indeed limits relationships with nature to instrumental ones. Yet, interspersed throughout Habermas's writings are clear indications that nonhuman life deserves moral consideration, and that humans can enter into communicative relationships with nonhumans, however asymmetrical. Habermas’s anthropocentric theoretical foundations can achieve a revised, reflective equilibrium congruent with his persistent intuitions that nonhumans also possess powers of communication (but not discourse) that would (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  1
    The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature.Ned Hettinger - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):237-240.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    The Natural Contract in the Anthropocene.Thomas Heyd & Bertrand Guillaume - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):209-227.
  16.  8
    Naturalness: Is the “Natural” Preferable to the “Artificial”?Eric Katz - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):241-244.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  1
    Engaging Nature: Environmentalism and the Political Theory Canon.Amy Linch - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):253-256.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  3
    Option Value, Substitutable Species, and Ecosystem Services.Erik Persson - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):165-181.
    The concept of ecosystem services is a way of visualizing the instrumental value that nature has for human beings. Most ecosystem services can be performed by more than one species. This fact is sometimes used as an argument against the preservation of species. However, even though substitutability does detract from the instrumental value of a species, it also adds option value to it. The option value cannot make a substitutable species as instrumentally valuable as a non-substitutable species, but in many (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Personhood, Ethics, and Animal Cognition: Situating Animals in Hare’s Two-Level Utilitarianism.Robert Streiffer - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):249-252.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  8
    The Ethics of the Meat Paradox.Lars Ursin - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):131-144.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  4
    Earth Stewardship: Linking Ecology and Ethics in Theory and Practice.Melissa Clarke - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):121-124.
  22.  15
    The Turn to Virtue in Climate Ethics.Willis Jenkins - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):77-96.
    Ethicists regularly turn to virtue in order to negotiate features of climate change that seem to overwhelm moral agency. Appeals to virtue in climate ethics differ by how they connect individual flourishing with collective responsibilities and by how they interpret Anthropocene relations. Differences between accounts of climate virtue help critique proposals to reframe global ecological problems in terms of resilience and planetary stewardship, the intelligibility of which depends on connecting what would be good for the species with what would be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  4
    Recognizing Our Place in the World.Nin Kirkham - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):97-119.
    What might a modern environmental or technological virtue or vice look like? That is, what virtues or vices might relate to our environmental place in the world, rather than our social place in the world? This question is particularly pressing in light of the unique chal­lenges presented by the current environmental and technological milieu. A recurring theme that arises in response to advances in certain technologies, particularly technologies that are seen in some way as “interfering in nature,” is that humans (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  4
    Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism and Current Environmental Education.Mei-Hsiang Lin - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):3-17.
    In an era in which a conflicting relationship exists between humans and nature, ways of solv­ing environmental problems need to be introduced into people’s thinking about what to do, what lifestyle we should accept, and what kind of people we should become to support our environmental protection work using better justifications. Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism can exert a profound ideological, philosophical, and spiritual influence on how people judge the meaning and value of their lives. Regarding how humans face the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    On the Enduring Importance of Deep Ecology.Tony Lynch & Stephen Norris - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):63-75.
    It is common to hear that deep ecology “has reached its logical conclusion and exhausted itself” in a vacuous anthropomorphism and absurd nonanthropocentrism. These conclusions should be rejected. Properly understood, neither objection poses a serious problem for deep ecology so much as for the ethic of “ecological holism” which some philosophers—wrongly—have taken to arise from deep ecology. Deep ecology is not such an ethic, but is best understood as an aesthetically articulated conception of what, following Robinson Jeffers, may be called (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  5
    Mill’s “Nature”.Dale E. Miller - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):127-128.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Stoic Quietude.Jonathan Parker - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):47-61.
    Soundscapes are comprised of biological sounds, non-biological sounds, and sounds introduced through human activity. These sounds provide us with the opportunity to both better understand and enjoy the natural world. Di­verse soundscapes across the globe are being degraded and disappearing altogether in the face of global climate change and habitat alteration. Humility and quietude are required as a means to confront the devastating loss of soundscapes. Stoicism offers fruitful accounts of these virtues that can be useful to us in our (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. The Logos of the Living World: Merleau-Ponty, Animals, and Language.Frank Schalow - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):125-126.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  5
    Nietzsche and Ecology Revisited.David E. Storey - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):19-45.
    There has been relatively little debate about Nietzsche’s place in environmental ethics, but the lines of the debate are well marked. He has been viewed as an anthropocentrist by Michael E. Zimmerman, a humanist by Ralph Acampora, a biocentrist and deep ecolo­gist by Max Hallman, a constructivist by Martin Drenthen, and an ecocentrist by Graham Parkes. Nietzsche does provide a theory of intrinsic value and his philosophy of nature is germane to an environmerntal ethic. His philosophical biology grounds his value (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues