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  1.  3
    Christian Diehm. Connection to Nature, Deep Ecology, and Conservation Social Science: Human-Nature Bonding and Protecting the Natural World.Bryan E. Bannon - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):379-382.
  2.  6
    Strong Sustainability Ethics.Michel Bourban - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):291-314.
    This article explains how strong sustainability ethics has emerged and developed as a new field over the last two decades as a critical response to influential conceptions of weak sustainability. It investigates three competing, normative approaches to strong sustainability: the communitarian approach, the Rawlsian approach, and the capabilities approach. Although these approaches converge around the idea that there are critical, non-substitutable natural resources and services, they diverge on how to reconcile human development and environmental protection. The aim of the paper (...)
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  3.  4
    Grounding Responsibility to Future Generations From a Kantian Standpoint.Igor Eterović - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):315-337.
    The problem of responsibility to future generations is inherently related to responsibility for the environment. Attempting to provide a new grounding for the figuration of such responsibility, Hans Jonas used Immanuel Kant’s ethics as a paradigm of traditional ethics to provide a critique of their limitations in addressing these issues, and he found three crucial problems in Kant’s ethics. Kant’s philosophy provides enough material for an answer to Jonas by building an account which 1) gives a teleological grounding of responsibility (...)
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  4.  4
    Steve Vanderheiden. Environmental Political Theory.Ben Mylius - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):383-384.
  5.  2
    John Lauritz Larson. Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America.Richard Newman - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):385-387.
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  6.  16
    Why Environmental Philosophers Should Be "Buck-Passers" About Value.Espen Dyrnes Stabell - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):339-354.
    The value of nature has been extensively debated in environmental ethics. There has been less discussion, however, about how one should understand the relation between this value and normativity, or reasons: if something in nature is seen as valuable, how should we understand the relation between this fact and claims about reasons to, for example, protect it or promote its existence? The “commonsense” view is that value gives rise to reasons. The buck-passing account of value, on the other hand, implies (...)
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  7.  9
    Desert-Adjusted Utilitarianism, People, and Animals.Jean-Paul Vessel - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):355-377.
    Recent decades have witnessed a surge in philosophical attention to the moral standing of non-human animals. Kantians, Neo-Kantians, utilitarians, and radical animal rights theorists have staked their claims in the literature. Here Fred Feldman’s desert-adjusted utilitarianism is introduced into the fray. After canvassing the prominent competitors in the dialectic, a conception of an overall moral ranking consonant with desert-adjusted utilitarianism is developed. Then the conception’s implications regarding the particular locations of individual people and animals in such rankings across various scenarios (...)
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  8.  17
    John Cage, Henry David Thoreau, Wild Nature, Humility, and Music.Andrew J. Corsa - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):219-234.
    John Cage and Henry David Thoreau draw attention to the indeterminacy of wild nature and imply humans cannot entirely control the natural world. This paper argues Cage and Thoreau each encourages his audience to recognize their own human limitations in relation to wildness, and thus each helps his audience to develop greater humility before nature. By reflecting on how Thoreau’s theory relates to Cage’s music, we can recognize how Cage’s music contributes to audiences’ environmental moral education. We can appreciate the (...)
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  9.  82
    Africapitalism, Ubuntu, and Sustainability.Matthew Crippen - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):235-259.
    Ubuntu originated in small-scale societies in precolonial Africa. It stresses metaphysical and moral interconnectedness of humans, and newer Africapitalist approaches absorb ubuntu ideology, with the aims of promoting community wellbeing and restoring a love of local place that global free trade has eroded. Ecological degradation violates these goals, which ought to translate into care for the nonhuman world, in addition to which some sub-Saharan thought systems promote environmental concern as a value in its own right. The foregoing story is reinforced (...)
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  10.  17
    Reciprocity as an Environmental Virtue.Nicholas Geiser - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):195-217.
    Three recent developments in environmental ethics—interest in virtue and character, concern for psychological realism, and collective action required to address global ecological challenges—are in tension with one another. For example, virtue ethical approaches in environmental ethics face objections from “situationist” critique and the strategic dimensions of collective action. This article proposes a conception of reciprocity as a response to this challenge for environmental virtue ethics. Environmental ethics has been traditionally skeptical of reciprocity due to its associations with self-interest, instrumental rationality, (...)
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  11.  4
    Lori Gruen, Ed. Critical Terms for Animal Studies.Bjørn Kristensen - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):285-286.
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  12.  4
    J. Michael Scott, John A. Wiens, Beatrice Van Horne, and Dale D. Goble. Shepherding Nature: The Challenge of Conservation Reliance. [REVIEW]Michael Paul Nelson - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):281-284.
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  13.  3
    David Kaplan. Food Philosophy: An Introduction.Samantha Noll - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):287-288.
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  14.  6
    Justice and Ecocide.Manuel Rodeiro - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (3):261-279.
    According to an environmental application of Rawlsian principles of justice, the well-ordered society cannot tolerate the perpetration of certain environmental harms. This paper gives an account of those harms committed in the form of ecocide. The concept of ecocide is developed, as well as the ideal of eco-relational pluralism, as conceptual tools for defending citizens’ environmental interests. This paper aims to identify persuasive and reasonably acceptable justice claims for compelling states to curtail environmentally destructive activities through recourse to principles firmly (...)
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  15.  4
    Trevor Hedberg. The Environmental Impact of Overpopulation: The Ethics of Procreation. [REVIEW]Eileen Crist - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (2):185-188.
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  16.  18
    Radical Virtue and Climate Action.Benjamin Hole - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (2):99-117.
    Radical virtue serves two distinct purposes: consolation in unfavorable circumstances, and prescription to achieve better ones. This paper maps out the theoretical nuances important for practical guidance. For a Stoic, radical virtue is a way to live well through environmental tragedy. For a consequentialist, it is an instrument to motivate us to combat climate change. For an Aristotelian, it is both. I argue that an Aristotelian approach fares the best, balancing the aim of external success with the aim of living (...)
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  17.  2
    Paul Wapner. Is Wildness Over? [REVIEW]Nathan Kowalsky - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (2):189-192.
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  18.  16
    Virtue Ethics and the Trilemma Facing Sentiocentrism.Rafael Rodrigues Pereira - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (2):165-184.
    This article aims to question the value of impartiality in environmental ethics by highlighting a problem internal to the bioethics approach known as sentiocentrism. The principle that all beings with the same degree of consciousness should receive the same moral treatment would lead to a trilemma, i.e., the need to choose among three morally unacceptable choices. I argue those problems are related to the premise, shared by Utilitarianism and rights-centered theories, that impartiality is the constitutive feature of the moral point (...)
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  19.  11
    Plato’s Anthropocentrism Reconsidered.Jorge Torres - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (2):119-141.
    Plato’s ideas on the value of nature and humankind are reconsidered. The traditional suggestion that his thought is ethically anthropocentric is rejected. Instead “Ethical Ratiocentrism” (ER) is the environmental worldview found in the dialogues. According to ER, human life is not intrinsically valuable, but only rational life is. ER is consistent with Plato’s holistic axiological outlook but incompatible with ethical anthropocentrism.
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  20.  5
    Nourishing Bonds.Katharine Wolfe - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (2):143-163.
    The care ethics tradition has long argued for the merits of understanding the self as relational. Inspired by this tradition, but also by ecofeminist philosophies that insist on the need to consider our wider ecological and interspecies connections, this paper focuses on the relational elements of breast/chestfeeding and their ethical implications. I show nursing to be an act that not only 1) connects us to one another through bonds of nourishment and care but also 2) reconnects us to our animal (...)
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  21.  2
    Stephanie Wakefield. Anthropocene Back Loop: Experimentation in Unsafe Operating Space. [REVIEW]Jeremy Bendik-Keymer & Katherine Cassese - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):79-82.
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  22.  6
    Partha Dasgupta: Time and the Generations: Population Ethics for a Diminishing Planet. [REVIEW]C. Tyler DesRoches - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):83-84.
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  23.  9
    The Personal Responsibility to Reduce Greenhouse Gases.Benjamin Howe - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):43-60.
    Many theorists who argue that individuals have a personal responsibility to reduce greenhouse gases tie the amount of GHGs that an individual is obligated to reduce to the amount that an individual releases, or what is often called a carbon footprint. The first section of this article argues that this approach produces standards that are too burdensome in some contexts. Section two argues that this approach produces standards of responsibility that are too lenient in other contexts and sketches an alternative (...)
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  24.  2
    Kelly Struthers Montford and Chloë Taylor, Eds. Colonialism and Animality: Anti-Colonial Perspectives in Critical Animal Studies. [REVIEW]Bjørn Kristensen - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):85-88.
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  25.  11
    Integrity and Agency: Negotiating New Forms of Human-Nature Relations in Biotechnology.Christopher Preston & Trine Antonsen - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):21-41.
    New techniques for modifying the genomes of agricultural organisms create difficult ethical challenges. We provide a novel framework to replace worn-out ethical lenses relying on ‘naturalness’ and ‘crossing species lines.’ Thinking of agricultural intervention as a ‘negotiation’ of ‘integrity’ and ‘agency’ provides a flexible framework for considering techniques such as genome editing with CRISPR/Cas systems. We lay out the framework by highlighting some existing uses of integrity in environmental ethics. We also provide an example of our lens at work by (...)
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  26.  13
    Harm, Responsibility, and the Far-Off Impacts of Climate Change.Dan Shahar - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):3-20.
    Climate change is already a major global threat, but many of its worst impacts are still decades away. Many people who will eventually be affected by it still have opportunities to mitigate harm. When considering the avoidable burdens of climate change, it seems plausible victims will often share some responsibility for putting themselves into harm’s way. This fact should be incorporated into our thinking about the ethical significance of climate-induced harms, particularly to emphasize the importance of differential abilities to get (...)
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  27.  3
    Akeel Bilgrami, Ed. Nature and Value. [REVIEW]Levi Tenen - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):89-92.
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  28.  3
    Jonathan A. Newman, Gary Varner, and Stefan Linquist. Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics. [REVIEW]John Wiens - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):93-96.
  29.  8
    The Ecological Ethics of Nordic Children’s Tales.Nina Witoszek & Martin Lee Mueller - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (1):61-78.
    For decades now, environmental philosophers from Arne Næss to Freya Mathews have dreamt of environmental ethics that “make things happen.” We contend such ethics can be found in Nordic children’s tales—those scriptures of moral guidance, and influential propellers of environmental action. In this essay we discuss the moral-imaginative worlds of fictitious in Nordic children’s tales, choosing some of the most canonical stories of the Nordics as our focal point. We argue the complex and often inconsistent philosophical mediations between human and (...)
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