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  1.  8
    The Oxford Handbook of Environmental Ethics.Melissa Clarke - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):447-450.
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  2.  6
    Understanding the Impact of the Animal Enterprise Terrorist Act on Animal Advocacy.Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):355-375.
    In many contemporary societies, there is an increasing number of animal welfare sympathizers and activists. In the United States, particularly, there are various individuals who have engaged in activist activities focused on animals. However, since 2006, and under the Animal Enterprise Terrorist Act, some of these activities have been classified as terrorist crimes. Independent of whether such activities are morally justified or not, the AETA law exaggerates these activist actions and can take the shape of silencing and restricting forms of (...)
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  3. Coastal Conservation.Jane Duran - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):437-446.
    There are two major reasons for holding that coastal conservation is of paramount impor­tance. The first is that our intuitive emotional response to coastal views harkens back to our sense of ancient times. It is a line of analysis that has been expanded upon by Henry David Thoreau and others. In addition to our emotional pull toward the coastlines, we are also faced with the facts that wetlands and their flora and fauna—particularly bird nests and similar constructions—are crucial to containing (...)
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  4. Piano Tide: A Novel.John Hausdoerffer - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):457-458.
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  5.  1
    Discourse-Theoretic Democracy and the Problem of Free-Riding in Global Climate-Change Mitigation.Antonius Bastian Limahekin - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):377-394.
    Free-riding in global climate-change mitigation is a serious problem both from moral and instrumental points of view. It goes against the principle of reciprocity and has a damaging impact on the global effort to combat climate change. This problem can be resolved within the scheme of discourse-theoretic democracy by exploiting the domestic political public sphere to channel the green voice pushing for the making of environmental laws and poli­cies, to raise public awareness of the damaging impacts of climate change, and (...)
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  6.  2
    The Seasons Alter: How to Save Our Planet in Six Acts.Kathleen Dean Moore - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):451-454.
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  7.  6
    Rethinking Wilderness.Jay Odenbaugh - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):459-460.
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  8.  2
    China’s Green Religion: Daoism and the Quest for a Sustainable Future.Chih-Wei Peng - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):455-456.
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  9. Good Ecological Work.Andrew R. H. Thompson - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):395-411.
    Novel ecosystems represent the challenge of the Anthropocene epoch on a local scale. In an age where human agency is the defining ecological factor, ecological discourse and practice finds itself in its own “non-analog” conditions. In this context, good work can be an important place for developing answers to these questions. The fields of ecological practice, such as restoration and management, with their characteristic orientation toward objectives, lack a substantive understanding of what good work entails. Consequently, these fields are unable (...)
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  10.  1
    The Evolution of Altruism and its Significance for Environmental Ethics.Peter Woodford - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (4):413-436.
    The significance of scientific research into the evolution of altruism for environmental ethics can be highlighted through an analysis of recent debates over William Hamilton’s theory of inclusive fitness. Recent debates over how to explain altruism have become particularly charged with ideological weight because they are seen to have some consequence for how we understand the human moral project, especially with regard to nonhuman life. By analyzing the place of evolutionary theory in the work of environmental ethicists some conclusions can (...)
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  11.  13
    The Future of Meat Without Animals.Cheryl Abbate - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):341-344.
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  12.  7
    How Many is Too Many?Susan Power Bratton - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):349-352.
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  13.  11
    A New Way of Valuing Nature.Henry Dicks - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):281-299.
    According to the renowned biomimicry specialist, Janine Benyus, biomimicry offers a new way of valuing nature based on the principle of learning from nature. Comparing and contrast­ing this new way of valuing nature with the dominant conception of nature as valuable for the ecosystem services it provides, an articulation of the respective theoretical frameworks of ecosystem services and biomimicry can be proposed. This articulation depends on the insight that each of the four basic categories of ecosystem service identified in the (...)
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  14.  9
    Animal Suffering in Nature.Oscar Horta - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):261-279.
    Many people think we should refrain from intervening in nature as much as possible. One of the main reasons for thinking this way is that the existence of nature is a net positive. However, population dynamics teaches us that most sentient animals who come into existence in nature die shortly thereafter, mostly in painful ways. Those who survive often suffer greatly due to natural causes. If sentient beings matter, this gives us reasons to intervene to prevent such harms. This counterintuitive (...)
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  15.  5
    Pope Francis’ Integral Ecology and Environmentalism for the Poor.Cajetan Iheka - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):243-259.
    The anthropocentrism of Pope Francis’ integral ecology in Laudato Si’ serves two strategic functions. First, it allows the pope to foreground the concerns of humans vulnerable to the ravages of ecological devastation, especially in the Global South. More importantly, privileging human beings justifies the responsibility Pope Francis places on us to engage in more sustainable relationships with one another and the environment. The encyclical’s investment in an ethics of care and the heterogeneity of its citational practice enhances its cosmopolitan appeal (...)
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  16.  1
    Pachasophy: Landscape Ethics in the Central Andes Mountains of South America. May Jr - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):301-319.
    Andean philosophy of nature or pachasophy results from topography and mode of production that, merged together, have produced an integrated and interacting worldview that blurs the line between culture and nature. Respecting Pacha, or the interconnectedness of life and geography, maintaining complementarity and equilibrium through symbolic interactions, and caring for Pachamama, the feminine presence of Pacha manifested mainly as cultivable soil are the basis of Andean environmental and social ethics. Reciprocity or ayni is the glue that holds everything together. This (...)
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  17.  5
    Debating Climate Ethics.David R. Morrow - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):345-348.
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  18.  5
    Beyond Technological Nihilism.Kalpita Bhar Paul - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):321-339.
    The three most-referred to concepts of Heidegger in environmental philosophy—Ereig­nis, “let things be,” and Gelassenheit—need to be reinterpreted in the light of Thomas Sheehan’s interpretation of them. Environmental philosophy conceives of these concepts as his suggestive treatments for transcending technological nihilism. Following Sheehan, this reinterpretation reveals that these concepts instead of delineating a radical way out of the technological nihilism evokes the need to realize the presence of the intrinsic hidden clearing as the fundamental-limiting reality of human existence. Rather than (...)
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  19.  5
    Tribute for Professor Victoria Davion.Piers H. G. Stephens & Chris J. Cuomo - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):242-242.
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  20.  6
    Hans Jonas.Jérôme Ballet & Damien Bazin - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):175-191.
    Environmental ethics and environmental justice have followed widely disparate paths, and this disassociation has resulted in an analytical schism. On the one side, environmental ethics embraces humankind’s relations with nature; on the opposite side, environmental justice embraces human-to-human relations via the medium of nature. Hans Jonas’ work is a bridge that crosses this conceptual divide: he spotlights the narrow correlation between human identity and responsibility, and insists on their inextricable bond with nature. However, this bond is a de facto bond (...)
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  21.  6
    On Moral Prioritization in Environmental Ethics.Shane Epting - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):131-146.
    Developing a way to address troublesome issues in areas such as urban planning is a chal-lenging undertaking. It includes making decisions that involve humans, nonhumans, future generations, and historical and cultural artifacts. All of these groups deserve consideration, but not equally. Figuring out how to approach this topic involves overcoming the problem of moral prioritization. The structure of weak anthropocentrism can help with this problem, suggesting that future research on the environmental aspects of metropolitan regions should make use of its (...)
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  22.  6
    Can Chinese Philosophy Embrace Wilderness?Shan Gao - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):147-159.
    Because of rapid industrialization and urbanization, many natural resources in China have increasingly been degraded. In response to this situation, China haslearned from the United States about one of its best ideas, national parks. This idea triggers many philosophical questions. How is wilderness interpreted in theUnited States? What are the philosophical foundations for the concept of intrinsic value in wilderness? Can Chinese philosophy accept wilderness? To answer these questions, the idea of intrinsic value in wilderness and the Western philosophical foundations (...)
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  23.  2
    The Early Nietzsche’s Alleged Anthropocentrism.A. Nolan Hatley - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):161-173.
    Both Max Hallman and David E. Storey rightly argue that Nietzsche is critical of anthropocentrism in his later philosophy. However, both also claim that Nietzsche, in his early philosophy, is still held captive to an anthropocentric view, particularly in “Schopenhauer as Educator,” the third of his Untimely Meditations. Neither, however, explores Schopenhauer’s own nonanthropocentric, sentiocentric approach to ethics and its influence on the early Nietzsche. An exploration of this background and a closer reading of the essay and its larger contest (...)
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  24.  6
    Reply to Philip Cafaro on Border Walls Gone Green.John Hultgren - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):239-240.
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  25.  4
    The Virtues of Gardening.Angela Kallhoff & Maria Schörgenhumer - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):193-210.
    Environmental virtues have become an essential ingredient in an ethics of nature. An account of environmental virtues can contribute to this ethics of natre by exploring the virtues that the gardener displays in cultivating and caring for plants. An approach that relates to the virtues of gardening is helpful in explicating a more general approach in a certain domain of interaction with nature. Good gardeners get involved in processes of natural growth and decay, they are aware of their position within (...)
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  26.  6
    Rejecting Amanda Machin’s Complacent Democracy.Rob Lawlor - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):211-233.
    Machin defends a new approach to climate change, which some claim is an “original” and “lucid” contribution that will “revitalize” the debate. Drawing on Slavoj Žižek’s interpretation of parallax and Chantal Mouffe’s radical democracy, Machin focuses on negotiation rather than moral argument, arguing that we should embrace disagreement. In the process of defending her view, Machin dismisses Naomi Klein, and various moral philosophers, arguing that framing the debate in terms of moral argument is ineffective, divisive, and ultimately leads to extremism (...)
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  27.  5
    Alienation and Nature in Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Steven Vogel - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (2):235-238.
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  28.  8
    Political Animals and Animal Politics. [REVIEW]Jeremy David Bendik-Keymer - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):125-128.
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  29.  5
    Border Walls Gone Green: Nature and Anti-Immigrant Politics in America. [REVIEW]Philip Cafaro - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):113-116.
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  30.  5
    The Ethics of Climate Governance. [REVIEW]Daniel Edward Callies - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):97-100.
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  31.  14
    Climate Change and Common-Sense Moral Responsibility.Ryan Darr - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):21-38.
    The harms that will result from climate change are so spatiotemporally distant from and complexly related to the acts that cause them that the common-sense concept of moral responsibility can seem inadequate. For this reason, Dale Jamieson has raised the possibility that climate change might represent not simply a moral failure but a failure of morality itself. The result could be a climate disaster for which no one is morally responsible. Debates about the adequacy of common-sense morality, however, often rely (...)
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  32.  19
    Climate Change—Do I Make a Difference?Bernward Gesang - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):3-19.
    When an individual’s action is only one among a large number of similar actions and does not seem to make any difference to the bad collective outcome, can it nonetheless be condemned by act utilitarianism? This question has currently regained interest with papers, e.g., by Shelly Kagan, Julia Nefsky, and Felix Pinkert. Christopher Morgan-Knapp and Charles Goodman answer the question in the affirmative for miniscule emissions in the context of climate change. They use expected utility analysis as Kagan did in (...)
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  33.  3
    A Critique of the Moral Defense of Vegetarianism. [REVIEW]Kathie Jenni - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):121-124.
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  34.  3
    Applying the Capabilities Approach to Ecosystems.Teea Kortetmäki - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):39-56.
    The capabilities approach has attracted broad interest in environmental ethics. One very interesting application is the environmental or extended capabilities approach which promotes the notion of environmental capabilities that contribute to the flourishingof nonhuman beings and ecological systems. The approach, however, lacks any account of the capabilities of ecological systems. The environmental capabilities approach can be applied at the ecosystem level with the flourishing of an ecosystem understood in terms of capabilities. Ecosystem flourishing presumes the ability of a given system (...)
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  35.  3
    The Structural Links Between Ecology, Evolution, and Ethics. [REVIEW]Nicolae Morar - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):117-120.
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  36.  43
    Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. [REVIEW]Toby Svoboda - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):101-104.
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  37.  4
    Restoring Layered Landscapes: History, Ecology, and Culture. [REVIEW]J. A. A. Swart - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):109-112.
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  38.  6
    The Anthropocene Project: Virtue in an Age of Climate Change. [REVIEW]William Throop - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):105-108.
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  39.  2
    From Anthropocentric to the Abiotic.Tina Tin - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):57-74.
    Over the past six decades, Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties have developed legal agreements to protect various aspects of the Antarctic environment. Strong anthropocentrism is generally rejected, and stewardship is accepted while protection of nonanthropocentric values is evoked when it furthers human interests. As one of the world’s remaining large wildernesses, Antarctica is under threat from the continuous expansion of the human footprint and is in need of attention from the wider society, including the environmental ethics community. The interdependence of all (...)
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  40.  10
    The Ethics of Animal Beauty.Samantha Vice - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):75-96.
    Taking hunting as an example, an account of animal beauty as animation can be developed. Our delight in many kinds of animals is crucially a matter of an aesthetic property which can be called “the animate” or “animation.” A proper response to animate animal beauty is a virtuous character trait that hunters lack. The beauty of animals calls for particular responses from observers: it brings along certain duties and requires the cultivation of certain traits of character—ones that are incompatible with (...)
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