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  1.  6
    Motivating (or Baby-Stepping Toward) a Global Constitutional Convention for Future Generation.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):199-220.
    Recently, I have been arguing for a global constitutional convention focused on protecting future generations. This deliberative body would be akin to the American constitutional convention of 1787, which gave rise to the present structure of government in the United States. It would confront the “governance gap” that currently exists surrounding concern for future generations. In particular, contemporary institutions tend to crowd out intergenerational concern, and thereby facilitate a “tyranny of the contemporary.” They not only fail to address a basic (...)
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  2.  3
    Benjamin Hale: The Wild and the Wicked: On Nature and Human Nature.Charles Hayes - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):287-288.
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  3.  1
    Ecocide or Environmental Self-Destruction?Sandra Baquedano Jer - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):237-247.
    The anthropocentric destruction of nature can be viewed as a form of self-destruction, which affects individuals and also the human species. It entails active destruction of the natural surroundings that are vital for the preservation of the planet’s biodiversity. But should ecocide, or environmental self-destruction of the life of certain species, be considered an “interruption” to the life of such species, or it is part of their natural life course? Are ecocide and environmental destruction identical, or substantively different, phenomena? Prevention (...)
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  4. Introduction to This Special Issue.Eric Pommier & Luca Valera - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):197-198.
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  5. Taxonomic Chauvinism, No More!Ricardo Rozzi - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):249-282.
    The culture of global society commonly associates the word animal with vertebrates. Paradoxically, most of animal diversity is composed of small organisms that remain invisible in the global culture and are underrepresented in philosophy, science, and education. Twenty-first century science has revealed that many invertebrates have consciousness and the capacity to feel pain. These discoveries urge animal ethicists to be more inclusive and to reevaluate the participation of invertebrates in the moral community. Science also has warned of the disappearance of (...)
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  6. Environmental Philosophies' Inter-Continental Dialogues.Ricardo Rozzi, Alexandria Poole & Francisca Massardo - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):195-196.
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  7.  1
    Should We Engineer Species in Order to Save Them?Ronald Sandler - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):221-226.
    There are two strategies for engineering species for conservation purposes, de-extinction and gene drives. Engineering species for conservation purposes is not in principle wrong, and on common criteria for assessing conservation interventions there may well be cases in which de-extinction and gene drives are evaluated positively in comparison to other possible strategies. De-extinction is not as transformative a conservation technique as it initially appears. It is largely dependent, as a conservation activity, upon traditional conservation practices, such as captive breeding programs, (...)
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  8. Daniel Edward Callies: Climate Engineering: A Normative Perspective.Patrick Taylor Smith - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):283-286.
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  9. Eileen Crist: Abundant Earth: Toward an Ecological Civilization. [REVIEW]J. Spencer Atkins - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):189-192.
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  10.  1
    Human Edibility, Ecological Embodiment.Christopher Cohoon - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):143-163.
    In her analyses of human ecological alienation, Val Plumwood implies that the recalcitrant problem of human exceptionalism is sustained in part by a kind of imaginative failure, by a certain blind spot to the ecological edibility of the human body. Among the many assumptions responsible for the blind spot, Plumwood suggests, is the liberal conception of the body as something proprietary, as something one owns. Plumwood’s work therefore establishes a new, if counterintuitive, task for environmental philosophy: to find or create (...)
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  11.  5
    Is There Common Ground Between Anthropocentrists and Nonanthropocentrists?Juan Pablo Hernández Betancur - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):99-114.
    Despite the fact that their disagreement concerns the most basic metaethical and metaphysical questions regarding our relation to nature, it has become apparent that many anthropocentrists share with nonanthropocentrists a concern for the environment for its own sake, that is to say, a noninstrumental concern for nature. This concern is also present in practical spheres of environmental engagement. With regard to the philosophical task of justifying the claim that we ought to protect nature, this concern imposes on those that share (...)
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  12.  6
    Nature’s Indifference.Simon P. James - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):115-128.
    Contrary to what writers such as Hans Jonas and Val Plumwood suggest, much of nature is indifferent to human interests. Mountains, glaciers, sun-baked salt pans—such entities care neither about what interests us humans nor about what is objectively in our interests. It might be hard to see how the property of being indifferent, in this sense, could add value. But it can. For those of us who inhabit highly technological, user-friendly environments, entities such as mountains can have therapeutic value precisely (...)
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  13.  3
    Donna Haraway: Staying with the Trouble: Makng Kin in the Chthulucene.Konrad Ott - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):185-188.
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  14.  1
    James S. J. Schwartz and Tony Milligan, Eds.: The Ethics of Space Exploration.Erik Persson - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):181-184.
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  15.  4
    Problem Animals.Anna Peterson - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):129-141.
    Nonhuman animals play various roles in environmental ethics, often as charismatic symbols of wilderness or active participants in the natural dramas we seek to preserve. Sometimes, however, nonhuman animals do not fit into—and may even threaten—the “nature” that we value. There are two especially problematic animals: white-tailed deer and feral cats. Together, these creatures shine light on a number of important issues in environmental ethics, including the tensions between animal welfare and environmentalism, the ways human interests and categories pervade even (...)
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  16. Existence Value, Preference Satisfaction, and the Ethics of Species Extinction.Espen Dyrnes Stabell - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):165-180.
    Existence value refers to the value humans ascribe to the existence of something, regard­less of whether it is or will be of any particular use to them. This existence value based on preference satisfaction should be taken into account in evaluating activities that come with a risk of species extinction. There are two main objections. The first is that on the preference satisfaction interpretation, the concept lacks moral importance because satisfying people’s preferences may involve no good or well-being for them. (...)
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  17.  12
    Kant, Chakrabarty, and the Crises of the Anthropocene.David Baumeister - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):53-67.
    Dipesh Chakrabarty has identified Immanuel Kant’s distinction between the human’s moral and animal dimensions as an underlying source of the failure of the humanities to respond to the ecological crises of the Anthropocene. Although relevant for the environmental humanities generally, Chakrabarty’s critique is especially germane to contemporary environmental philosophy. It shows how the reality of anthropogenic climate change renders central aspects of Kant’s influential conception of human nature untenable. While closer examination of Kant’s writings corroborates the core of Chakrabarty’s reading, (...)
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  18.  8
    Tetsuro Watsuji’s Milieu and Intergenerational Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):37-51.
    The concept of humans as relational individuals living in a milieu can provide some solutions to various obstacles of theorization that are standing in the way of an ethics of sustainability. The idea of a milieu was developed by Tetsuro Watsuji as a web of signification and symbols. It refers to the environment as lived by a subjective relational human being and not as artificially objectified. The milieu can neither be separated from its temporal—or historical—dimension as it is directly related (...)
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  19.  6
    Stephen Cohen: The Sustainable City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier.Shane Epting - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):95-96.
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  20.  3
    Artifacts and the Limitations of Moral Considerability.Magdalena Hoły-Łuczaj - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):69-87.
    Environmental philosophy always presents detailed distinctions concerning the kinds of natural beings that can be granted moral considerability, when discussing this issue. In contrast, artifacts, which are excluded from the scope of moral considerability, are treated as one homogenous category. This seems problematic. An attempt to introduce certain distinctions in this regard—by looking into dissimilarities between physical and digital artifacts—can change our thinking about artifacts in ethical terms, or more precisely, in environmentally ethical terms.
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  21.  10
    Natural Meanings and Cultural Values.Simon P. James - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):3-16.
    In many cases, rivers, mountains, forests, and other so-called natural entities have value for us because they contribute to our well-being. According to the standard model of such value, they have instrumental or “service” value for us on account of their causal powers. That model tends, however, to come up short when applied to cases when nature contributes to our well-being by virtue of the religious, political, historical, personal, or mythic meanings it bears. To make sense of such cases, a (...)
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  22.  8
    T. J. Kasperbauer: Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes to Animals.Bjørn Kristensen - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):93-94.
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  23.  8
    Laudato Si, Marx, and a Human Motivation for Addressing Climate Change.Timothy A. Weidel - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):17-36.
    In the face of climate change, moral motivation is central: why should individuals feel compelled to act to combat this problem? Justice-based responses miss two morally salient issues: that the key ethical relationship is between us and the environment, and there is something in it for us to act to aid our environment. In support of this thesis there are two seemingly disparate sources: Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si and the early Marx’s account of human essence as species-being. Francis argues (...)
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  24.  5
    Matthias Fritsch: Taking Turns with the Earth: Phenomenology, Deconstruction and Intergenerational Justice.Byron Williston - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):89-92.
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  25.  42
    Do Species Really Matter?Brendan Cline - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 40 (3):241-260.
    Many environmentalists hold that the loss of a species is intrinsically bad, and many also think that we have moral obligations to species as such. In an attempt to capture these thoughts, some philosophers have suggested that species are bearers of intrinsic value. This approach works well in paradigmatic cases. However, it begins to break down in more difficult scenarios, such as when species boundaries are unclear or when resources are scarce. The case study of the Galápagos giant tortoises in (...)
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