9 found

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  1.  5
    The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy Ed. By Knud Haakonssen.Stephen Buckle - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (2):305-309.
    The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy is a massive achievement, and in more than one sense. The most obvious is its sheer bulk: two volumes totalling 1400 pages, including over 150 pages of bibliography and index and another 100 pages of biobibliographical appendix. This last item, as its name suggests, provides thumbnail biographies of all the main figures referred to in the volumes together with a list of all their main publications with publication dates and also a short list of (...)
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  2.  2
    Setting the Standard: Don Garrett's Hume.E. Loeb Louis - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (2):243-278.
    Who other than Don Garrett could construct a work this rigorous and comprehensive, encompassing Hume’s aesthetics, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion—not as add-ons but tightly integrated into a genuinely new interpretation? Garrett’s intricate reading has no equal in the architectonic it locates in Hume’s philosophical corpus. This elegantly crafted work will reinvigorate thinking about Hume’s theory of normativity across the epistemic and moral realms.1 I center my comments on a central line of argument in chapters 4, 5, and 7. (...)
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  3.  3
    Fruitless Remorses: Hume's Critique of the Penitential Project of The Whole Duty of Man.Alison McIntyre - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (2):143-167.
    First published in 1658, The Practice of Christian Graces. Or The Whole Duty of Man Laid Down in a Plaine and Familiar Way for the Use of All, but especially the Meanest Reader1 became the most popular devotional work in Restoration England.2 It contains 17 sermons designed to be read in sequence, one each Sunday, in order to guide the penitent in reflecting on the week’s sins. Samuel Johnson’s mother made him read it on Sunday afternoons during his youth. Hume (...)
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  4.  8
    Skepticism About Garrett's Hume : Faculties, Concepts, and Imposed Coherence.Peter Millican - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (2):205-226.
    Hume, Don Garrett’s new book—long anticipated and well worth the wait—is a tour de force. Garrett’s impressive ability to weave a coherent philosophical account of Hume’s ideas, even when they seem most muddled or contradictory, is here fully displayed, linking together Hume’s thought as a whole and finding systematic themes within it whose potential richness has escaped other commentators. As a great admirer of Garrett’s work, from which I have learned so much over the years, I found it fascinating to (...)
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  5.  6
    The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume by Udo Thiel.Anik Waldow - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (2):301-304.
    This monograph is an important book for anyone interested in the topic of consciousness and personal identity in early modern thought. It offers a rich overview of the vast array of writers reflecting on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century conceptions of persons, their responsibilities, the issue of immortality, and the development of an account of consciousness based on the way in which minds relate to their own thoughts and feelings. It traces the lines of influence from the scholastic background to Descartes and (...)
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  6.  42
    Personal Identity, Passions, and "The True Idea of the Human Mind".Lilli Alanen - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (1):3-28.
    Hume is famous for his criticism of substantial minds, free will, and self-consciousness—central elements in traditional philosophical accounts of persons. His empiricism dissolves self-inspecting minds into heaps of distinct perceptions and turns cognitive faculties into successions of causally related, discrete impressions and ideas. Whatever regularities the complex ideas and their bundles or heaps display are explained by laws of association of ideas, which are supposed to play the same role in the mental world as Newton’s laws of gravitation play in (...)
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  7.  19
    The Moral Sentiments in Hume's Treatise: A Classificatory Problem.Åsa Carlson - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (1):73-94.
    In the Treatise, Hume writes several seemingly incompatible things about the moral sentiments, thus there is no general agreement about where they fit within his taxonomy of the perceptions. Some passages speak in favor of the view that moral sentiments are indirect passions, a few in favor of the view that they are direct passions, and yet a couple of explicit statements strongly suggest otherwise. Due to these tensions in Hume’s text, we find at least five competing characterizations in the (...)
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  8.  7
    A Bibliography for Hume's History of England: A Preliminary View.Roger I. Emerson & Mark G. Spencer - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (1):53-71.
    Hume’s History of England has received a good deal of attention over the years, but no one has ever systematically studied his sources.1 Instead, scholars have worried about Hume’s biases, his portraits of figures like Charles I, and his alleged scorn for mere antiquarianism, which resulted in a readable but superficial history. The most exciting monograph dealing with his History of England in recent years sees it as a step in the process which led to nineteenth-century historicism. Others have seen (...)
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  9.  6
    Dialoghi Sulla Religione Naturale by David Hume.Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte - 2016 - Hume Studies 40 (1):137-139.
    Not as well-known overseas as it should be, there is an important and active Italian tradition of Hume scholarship. One of its most recent and more important representatives is Professor Gianni Paganini, translator into Italian and editor of Norman Kemp Smith’s already excellent edition of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. As is well known, it was a posthumous work by the Scottish philosopher and one of his works that raises the most difficulties for his interpreters. Paganini’s edition consists of a (...)
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