Year:

  1.  99
    Teaching the Debate.Brian Besong - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):401-412.
    One very common style of teaching philosophy involves remaining publicly neutral regarding the views being debated—a technique commonly styled ‘teaching the debate.’ This paper seeks to survey evidence from the literature in social psychology that suggests teaching the debate naturally lends itself to student skepticism toward the philosophical views presented. In contrast, research suggests that presenting one’s own views alongside teaching the debate in question—or ‘engaging the debate’—can effectively avoid eliciting skeptical attitudes among students without sacrificing desirable pedagogical outcomes. Thus, (...)
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  2.  4
    Teaching Plato In Palestine: Philosophy in a Divided World, by Carlos Fraenkel.Timothy Chambers - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):531-534.
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  3.  2
    Engaging Political Philosophy: An Introduction, by Robert B. Talisse.Michael Clifford - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):534-537.
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  4.  2
    Time: A Philosophical Introduction, by James Harrington.Cowling Sam - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):537-540.
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  5.  4
    Helping Philosophy Students Become Employable.Andrew Fisher & Jonathan Tallant - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):413-451.
    Can we help philosophy students become employable without offending those who say that such a task is not the job of an academic? Can we do this by using the insights from the literature that suggest the most effective way to teach employability is a close link to employers? We are happy to report that the answer is ‘yes.’ In this paper we share what we achieved and why we believe it was effective. We briefly discuss the background and genesis (...)
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  6.  1
    Lusting for Infinity: A Spiritual Odyssey, by Tom W. Boyd.Fogel Dara - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):540-544.
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  7.  3
    A Philosophical Response to Plagiarism.Joel Hubick - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):453-481.
    I analyze the potential a link between the problem of plagiarism and academic responsibility. I consider whether or not the way teachers and students view each other, education, and the writing process is irresponsible wherein producing papers becomes more valuable than the genuine learning that paper writing is originally intended to indicate and facilitate. This irresponsibility applies to both students and teachers who allow writing papers to be industrialized into meaningless tasks done in order to obtain a grade / pass (...)
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  8. The Dimension of Difference: Space, Time and Bodies in Women’s Cinema and Continental Philosophy, by Caroline Godart.Loevy Katharine - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):544-547.
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  9. Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience, by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang.Jennifer McCrickerd - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):547-552.
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  10.  7
    Grading (Anxious and Silent) Participation: Assessing Student Attendance and Engagement with Short Papers on a “Question For Consideration".Kathryn J. Norlock - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):483-505.
    The inclusion of attendance and participation in course grade calculations is ubiquitous in postsecondary syllabi, but can penalize the silent or anxious student unfairly. I outline the obstacles posed by social anxiety, then describe an assignment developed with the twin goals of assisting students with obstacles to participating in spoken class discussions, and rewarding methods of participation other than oral interaction. When homework assignments habituating practices of writing well-justified questions regarding well-documented passages in reading assignments are the explicit project of (...)
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  11.  1
    Grading Participation.Kathryn J. Norlock - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):483-505.
    The inclusion of attendance and participation in course grade calculations is ubiquitous in postsecondary syllabi, but can penalize the silent or anxious student unfairly. I outline the obstacles posed by social anxiety, then describe an assignment developed with the twin goals of assisting students with obstacles to participating in spoken class discussions, and rewarding methods of participation other than oral interaction. When homework assignments habituating practices of writing well-justified questions regarding well-documented passages in reading assignments are the explicit project of (...)
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  12. Interest Convergence.J. Pierce Andrew - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):507-530.
    In this paper, I offer a psychologically informed critique of and alternative to approaches to teaching issues of race and racial justice that are based on the recognition of white privilege. White privilege pedagogy, I argue, faces serious limitations avoided by a pedagogy grounded in “interest convergence.” Advanced by critical race theorist Derrick Bell, the theory of interest convergence holds that racial progress is most likely when the interests of whites converge with the interests of oppressed racial groups. Applying this (...)
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  13. Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: An Anthology, Edited by Jonathan Anomaly, Geoffrey Brennan, Michael Munger, and Geoffrey Sayre-McCord.Reynolds Alan - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):552-555.
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  14. Ultimate Questions: Thinking About Philosophy, 3rd Edition, by Nils Ch. Rauhut.Clint Tibbs - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):555-558.
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  15.  2
    The Problems of Contemporary Philosophy: A Critical Guide for the Unaffiliated, by Paul Livingston and Andrew Cutrofello.Sarah E. Vitale - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):558-561.
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  16.  2
    The Philosophy of Cognitive Science, by M. J. Cain.John Philip Waterman - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):561-564.
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  17.  1
    Philosophy’s Artful Conversation, by D. N. Rodowick. [REVIEW]Timothy Yenter - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):565-567.
    Philosophy’s Artful Conversation draws on Gilles Deleuze, Stanley Cavell, and the later writing by Ludwig Wittgenstein to defend a “philosophy of the humanities.” Both because film studies is historically a site of contention and theoretical upheaval and because Rodowick accepts Cavell’s idea that (at least in the American context) film is philosophy made ordinary, bringing philosophical questions of skepticism and perfectionism into filmgoers’ lives inescapably, it makes sense to build this vision for the humanities out of writing on film. Although (...)
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  18.  1
    How to Get Philosophy Students Talking: An Instructor’s Toolkit, by Andrew Fisher and Jonathan Tallant. [REVIEW]Greg Damico - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):359-362.
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  19.  2
    Four Volumes in the Philosophy of Education.Dana Delibovi - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):347-358.
    The philosophy of education began, in the work of Plato, with two normative questions: What should humans be taught? And by what method should they be taught it? Those simple questions have been obscured by ever-increasing complexity in educational philosophy. The philosophy of education may currently include too much, and so this review of four general texts uses this criterion of a book’s merit: the ability to retain what is most obviously philosophical and eliminate what is not. On that criterion, (...)
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  20.  1
    The Research Skills of Undergraduate Philosophy Majors.Heidi Gauder & Fred W. Jenkins - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):263-278.
    This article presents a case study of how one school introduced a one-credit course for philosophy majors focused on effective searching for and critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources. The course curriculum is based on departmental learning outcomes, and is also aligned with the Association of College and Research Libraries standards.
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  21.  2
    The Ethics of Immigration, by Joseph H. Carens. [REVIEW]Peter W. Higgins - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):363-367.
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  22.  1
    On Romantic Love: Simple Truths About a Complex Emotion, by Berit Brogaard. [REVIEW]Kyle Hubbard - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):367-369.
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  23. Thinking Things Through: An Introduction to Philosophical Issues and Achievements, 2nd Edition, by Clark Glymour. [REVIEW]Hubbs Graham - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):370-372.
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  24. Experiential Learning in Philosophy, Julinna Oxley and Ramona Ilea, Editors. [REVIEW]Debra Jackson - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):372-376.
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  25.  1
    On Inequality, by Harry G. Frankfurt. [REVIEW]Kling Jennifer - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):377-380.
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  26. On Philosophy: Notes From a Crisis, by John McCumber. [REVIEW]Koch Christofer - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):381-384.
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  27. Remembrance of Philosophy Classes Past: Why Cognitive Science Suggests That a Brief Recap Is the Best Way to Start Each Class Day.Dan Lowe - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):279-289.
    In the past few decades there has been rapid progress in cognitive science with respect to how people learn. Indeed, it can be difficult to keep up with all of the recent findings, and it is sometimes unclear how these findings should influence day-to-day teaching in the philosophy classroom. But one simple way to use the insights of cognitive science in the philosophy classroom is to begin each class with a five-minute recap of the previous few lessons. Cognitive science suggests (...)
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  28.  1
    Understanding Understanding.Oakes M. Gregory - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):291-306.
    Drawing on the basic philosophy of mind of the modern period, I offer a means of improving clarity of student written thought. Clarity of thought entails the sort of concept-sensation synthesis central to Kant’s account of human experience: or in more recent terminology, to be clear is to recognize the intention of a concept in a member of its extension. Simple analysis of concepts and of the mental state of understanding reveals structures that can help diagnose and repair conceptual weakness. (...)
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  29. Business Ethics: An Interactive Introduction, by Andrew Kernohan. [REVIEW]A. Petrick Joseph - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):384-387.
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  30.  1
    A Journey Through Philosophy in 101 Anecdotes, by Nicholas Rescher. [REVIEW]Philip Smith - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):388-390.
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  31.  2
    How to Teach Philosophy of Film.Katherine Thomson-Jones - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):329-345.
    Even though philosophy of film is a relatively small and relatively young philosophical subfield, I argue that it is well worth a dedicated undergraduate course. I outline such a course below, with reference to particular anthologies of readings and a corresponding list of central topics. I recommend adopting a broad conception of film, to include moving image works in a range of formats and technological media, as well as an inclusive approach to philosophizing about film, one that draws on the (...)
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  32.  1
    What Philosophy Can Do, by Gary Gutting. [REVIEW]Matthew Van Cleave - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):390-394.
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  33.  1
    Mass Moralizing: Marketing and Moral Storytelling, by Phil Hopkins. [REVIEW]Andy Wible - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):394-397.
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  34. Restricting Mobile Device Use in Introductory Philosophy Classrooms.Wright Jake - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):307-327.
    A restricted-use mobile device policy for introductory philosophy classrooms is presented and defended. The policy allows students to use devices only during open periods announced by the professor and is based on recent empirical findings on the effects of in-class mobile device use. These results suggest devices are generally detrimental to student learning, though they have targeted benefits for specific tasks. The policy is defended via a discussion of the ethical considerations surrounding device use, a discussion of the policy’s benefits, (...)
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  35.  10
    Human Kindness and the Smell of Warm Croissants: An Introduction to Ethics, by Ruwen Ogien. [REVIEW]Bhavsar Ayesha - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):221-223.
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  36. Beyond the Abortion Wars: A Way Forward for a New Generation, by Charles C. Camosy. [REVIEW]Lisa Cassidy - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):223-225.
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  37.  1
    'Philosophy'—After the End of Philosophy: In a Globalizing and Glocalizing World, by Nader N. Chokr. [REVIEW]C. Tabor Fisher - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):226-229.
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  38.  1
    Violence and Civility: On the Limits of Political Philosophy, by Etienne Balibar. [REVIEW]Dara Fogel - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):230-233.
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  39.  11
    Ethical Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Edition, Edited by Russ Shafer-Landau. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Foreman - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):233-235.
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  40.  4
    Body Practice and Meditation as Philosophy.Steven Geisz - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):115-135.
    What challenges arise when attempting to incorporate body practice and meditation into undergraduate philosophy courses? In recent years, a number of philosophers have begun teaching such practices in academic classrooms, and at my university I have experimented specifically with teaching qigong, taijiquan, hatha yoga, and meditation techniques in a variety of courses on East Asian and Indian philosophy. Teaching body practices and meditations poses potential problems about exclusion and advocacy in the classroom: exclusion, in the sense that the practices might (...)
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  41.  2
    The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically, by Peter Singer. [REVIEW]Abigail Gosselin - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):235-238.
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  42.  10
    Exploring Video Feedback in Philosophy.Tanya Hall, Dean Tracy & Andy Lamey - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):137-162.
    This paper explores the benefits of video feedback for teaching philosophy. Our analysis, based on results from a self-report student survey along with our own experience, indicates that video feedback possesses a number of advantages over traditional written comments. In particular we argue that video feedback is conducive to providing high-quality formative feedback, increases detail and clarity, and promotes student engagement. In addition, we argue that the advantages of video feedback make the method an especially apt tool for addressing challenges (...)
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  43. Philosophy of Social Science: A New Introduction, Edited by Nancy Cartwright and Eleonora Montuschi. [REVIEW]S. Lewis William - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):239-243.
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  44. Review of Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce? [REVIEW]Nancy J. Matchett - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):243-47.
  45.  2
    Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce?, by David Benatar and David Wasserman. [REVIEW]Nancy J. Matchett - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):243-247.
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  46.  86
    What Quantum Mechanics Doesn't Show.Justin P. McBrayer & Dugald Owen - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):163-176.
    Students often invoke quantum mechanics in class or papers to make philosophical points. This tendency has been encouraged by pop culture influences like the film What the Bleep do We Know? There is little merit to most of these putative implications. However, it is difficult for philosophy teachers unfamiliar with quantum mechanics to handle these supposed implications in a clear and careful way. This paper is a philosophy of science version of MythBusters. We offer a brief primer on the nature (...)
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  47. Educating a Diverse Nation: Lessons From Minority-Serving Institutions, by Clifton Conrad and Marybeth Gasman. [REVIEW]Jennifer McCrickerd - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):247-250.
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  48.  10
    Happiness, Goodness, and the Best Things in Life. [REVIEW]Matthew Pianalto - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):209-220.
    In this article, I review some recent introductory texts on the nature of happiness and the good life.
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  49.  12
    Contemporary Debates in Bioethics, Edited by Arthur L. Caplan and Robert Arp. [REVIEW]Robert C. Robinson - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):250-253.
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  50.  10
    Environmental Ethics: An Overview for the Twenty-First Century, 2nd Edition, Fully Revised and Expanded, by Robin Attfield. [REVIEW]Smillie W. Mark - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):253-256.
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  51.  1
    How to Teach Philosophy of Mind.Renée Smith - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):177-207.
    The most notable contributions to contemporary philosophy of mind have been written by philosophers of mind for philosophers of mind. Without a good understanding of the historical framework, the technical terminology, the philosophical methodology, and the nature of the philosophical problems themselves, not only do undergraduate students face a difficult challenge when taking a first course in philosophy of mind, but instructors lacking specialized knowledge in this field might be put off from teaching the course. This paper is intended to (...)
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  52. Phenomenology: An Introduction, by Stephan Käufer and Anthony Chemero. [REVIEW]Jere Surber - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):256-258.
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  53.  1
    American Philosophy: From Wounded Knee to the Present, by Erin McKenna and Scott L. Pratt. [REVIEW]Dwayne A. Tunstall - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):259-262.
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  54.  14
    Beyond “Add Teaching and Learning and Stir”.Stephen Bloch-Schulman & Meagan Carr - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):25-42.
    This article is a critical response to Concepción, Messineo, Wieten, and Homan’s “The State of Teacher Training in Philosophy.” In it, I utilize an epistemologies-of-ignorance framework to highlight the incentives we, as philosophers, have to ignore teaching and learning about teaching and learning. I argue that the problems are not merely about our individual desires, but rather, that there is a regime of ignorance that encourages us not to know. I argue therefore that real change requires more than a shift (...)
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  55.  9
    Truth, by Chase Wrenn.David J. Buller - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):69-72.
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  56.  43
    The State of Teacher Training in Philosophy.David W. Concepción, Melinda Messineo, Sarah Wieten & Catherine Homan - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):1-24.
    This paper explores the state of teacher training in philosophy graduate programs in the English-speaking world. Do philosophy graduate programs offer training regarding teaching? If so, what is the nature of the training that is offered? Who offers it? How valuable is it? We conclude that philosophers want more and better teaching training, and that collectively we know how to deliver and support it.
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  57.  11
    Persons and Personal Identity, by Amy Kind.Dana Delibovi - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):72-76.
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  58.  10
    Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away, by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein.Sheryle Dixon - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):76-78.
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  59.  8
    Puzzled?! An Introduction to Philosophizing, by Richard Kenneth Atkins.Rebeka Ferreira - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):79-81.
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  60.  9
    Existentialism: An Introduction, by Kevin Aho.John M. Hersey - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):81-85.
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  61.  11
    Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice, by Marion Hourdequin.Kendy M. Hess - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):85-90.
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  62.  13
    The Pedagogical Imperative.Karen L. Hornsby - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):51-68.
    This article is a commentary response to the study results outlined in “The State of Teacher Training in Philosophy.” In recognition of the study’s determination that 70 percent of the jobs new philosophers will apply for are non-tenure track, our graduate programs must provide training in teaching excellence and the fostering of student learning, or what I call pedagogical areté. I will argue that achieving this teaching excellence requires 1) Familiarity with cognitive neuroscience advancements on how people learn, 2) Knowledge (...)
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  63.  26
    From Self-Centered to Learner-Centered.John Immerwahr - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):43-50.
    Successful learning is based on a reciprocal relationship between instructor and student that, in turn, requires the instructor to have a deep understanding of the student’s background, interests, fears and resistances. In fact, many beginning philosophy instructors have a rather limited understanding of what their students bring to the educational interaction. The conclusion is that training in pedagogy must be more than teaching techniques but should also include more exposure to an understanding of the experience of contemporary college students. An (...)
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  64.  11
    Public Health Ethics, Second Edition, by Stephen Holland.Karen M. Meagher - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):90-95.
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  65.  7
    Subject and Object: Frankfurt School Writings on Epistemology, Ontology, and Method, Edited by Ruth Groff.David S. Owen - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):96-98.
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  66.  11
    Ontology and Metaontology: A Contemporary Guide, by Francesco Berto and Matteo Plebani.Max Suffis - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):98-102.
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  67.  13
    Understanding Beliefs, by Nils J. Nilsson.John P. Sullins - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):103-106.
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  68.  15
    Everyday Examples: An Introduction to Philosophy, by David Cunning.Mike VanQuickenborne - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):106-110.
    Everyday Examples. An Introduction to Philosophy. presents the student with a somewhat unorthodox approach to the grand themes of philosophy. David Cunning has chosen an alternate route into many of the standard questions put to those in an introduction to philosophy course, both organizationally and content-wise. It will be quickly evident to the instructor that this approach has both its advantages and disadvantages.
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  69.  10
    Worldly Virtue, by Judith Andre.Eleanor Wittrup - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):110-113.
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