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  1.  23
    Using Conway’s Game of Life to Teach Free Will.Galen Barry - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (4):337-347.
    The concept of determinism proves to be a persistent stumbling block to student comprehension of issues surrounding free will. Students tend to commit two main errors. First, they often confuse determinism with the related but importantly different idea of fatalism. Second, students often do not adequately understand that mental states, such as desires or beliefs, can function as deterministic causes. This paper outlines a straightforward in-class exercise modeled after John Horton Conway’s “Game of Life” computer simulation. The exercise aims to (...)
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  2. Consuming Choices: Ethics in a Global Consumer Age, 2nd Edition, by David T. Schwartz.Alexander Bearden - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (4):429-432.
  3.  2
    Fostering Wisdom in the Classroom, Part 2.Brian Bruya & Monika Ardelt - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (4):349-380.
    Advances in both the science and theory of wisdom have made it possible to create sound wisdom curricula and test them in the classroom. This article is a report of one such attempt. We developed a curriculum consistent with theories of wisdom that espouse the following five methods: challenge beliefs; prompt the articulation of values; encourage self-development; encourage self-reflection; and groom the moral emotions—facilitated by the reading of narrative or didactic texts and fostering a community of inquiry. The texts used (...)
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  4.  6
    Twelve Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos, by Jordan B. Peterson.Dara Fogel - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (4):432-435.
  5.  1
    Thinking Inside the Box.Laura Martena - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (4):381-406.
    This paper discusses the widespread use of "trolley problems" in the ethics classroom from a critical perspective. After tracing the enormous popularity of ‘trolleyology’ in recent moral philosophy, differentiating various functions these hypotheticals are supposed to fulfill in ethical discourse and carving out the underlying conception of normative ethics as a quasi-scientific enterprise, I examine how they are constructed and how they affect their recipient. Against this background, I argue that despite their popularity, the use of trolley problems in the (...)
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  6. In Defense of the Progressive Stack: A Strategy for Prioritizing Marginalized Voices During in-Class Discussion.Jake Wright - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (4):407-428.
    Progressive stacking is a strategy for prioritizing in-class contributions that allows marginalized students to speak before non-marginalized students. I argue that this strategy is both pedagogically and ethically defensible. Pedagogically, it provides benefits to all students (e.g., expanded in-class discourse) while providing special benefits (e.g., increased self-efficacy) to marginalized students, helping to address historic educational inequalities. Ethically, I argue that neither marginalized nor non-marginalized students are wronged by such a policy. First, I present a strategy for self-disclosure that reduces the (...)
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  7.  2
    Productive Alienation Via Service Learning.Karen Adkins - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):217-238.
    This paper argues for the specific pedagogical and philosophical value of toggling between places, as experienced in service or community-based learning. Regular shifting of student perspectives by traveling from a classroom to a community service site alienates students from their assumptions about beliefs, and opens up more diverse perspectives within the classroom.
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  8.  15
    Fostering Wisdom in the Classroom, Part 1.Brian Bruya & Monika Ardelt - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):239-253.
    This article reviews the literature on theories of wisdom pedagogy and abstracts out a single theory of how to foster wisdom in formal education. The fundamental methods of wisdom education are found to be: challenge beliefs; prompt the articulation of values; encourage self-development; encourage self-reflection; and groom the moral emotions. These five methods of wisdom pedagogy rest on two facilitating methods: read narrative or didactic texts and foster a community of inquiry. This article is companion to two further articles, one (...)
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  9.  6
    The Animal Ethics Reader, 3rd Edition. Edited by Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler.Mark Causey - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):315-318.
  10.  30
    Creating Scientific Controversies: Uncertainty and Bias in Science and Society, by David Harker.James Elliott - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):318-322.
  11.  5
    Teaching Philosophy: A Guide, by Steven M. Cahn.Frank Fair - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):323-326.
  12.  3
    The Power of Parables in Critical Thinking.Linda L. Farmer - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):255-259.
    Parables are not frequently found in critical thinking textbooks. And, yet, because parables are relatively simple, engaging stories, they can present various principles of good reasoning and attitudes of a critical thinker in a way that is fun and accessible to the students in our classrooms. Using two well-known parables, W. K. Clifford’s Ship Owner and John Wisdom’s Invisible Gardener, I outline how parables like these can be used in the teaching of critical thinking, and what the benefits of doing (...)
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  13.  6
    Community of Philosophical Inquiry and the Play of the World.David Kennedy - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):285-302.
    This paper seeks to identify the role of play in the design and function of Socratic dialogue as practiced in community of philosophical inquiry in classrooms. It reviews the ideas of some major play theorists from various fields of study and practice—philosophy, cultural anthropology, evolutionary psychology, cognitive psychology, psychoanalysis, and education—and identifies the epistemological, ontological, and axiological judgments they share in their analyses of the phenomenon of play. It identifies five psychodynamic dimensions in which the Socratic play of “following the (...)
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  14.  4
    Undergraduate Conferences as High Impact Practices with an Impact on Gender Parity.W. John Koolage & Danielle Clevenger - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):261-284.
    There has been a recent explosion of undergraduate philosophy conferences across the United States. In this paper, we explore undergraduate conferences along three lines. First, we argue that, as a well-designed learning activity, undergraduate conferences can serve to increase gender parity in philosophical spaces—a widely accepted and important goal for our discipline. Second, we argue that this increase in parity is due, at least in part, to the proper design of undergraduate conferences as High-Impact Practices. Our empirical work on our (...)
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  15.  11
    Philosophy for Graduate Students: Metaphysics and Epistemology, by Alex Broadbent.Ka Ya Lee - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):326-329.
  16. Asian Philosophies. 7th Ed. Edited by John M. Koller.Adam Neikirk - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):329-331.
  17.  2
    Knowing the Score: What Sports Can Teach Us About Philosophy , by David Papineau.M. G. Piety - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):331-335.
  18.  3
    Sign.Mary Beth Willard - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):303-313.
    I present a case study of the use of a table-top role-playing game in a mid-level course that presupposes no previous familiarity with philosophy. The course covered philosophical analyses of propaganda and language, and the pedagogical purpose of the game was to help students grasp the basics of philosophical and linguistic theories of assertion quickly. The game, Sign, directs players to create a signed language collaboratively, and thus forces them to pay attention to the subtle ways in which communication occurs.
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  19.  13
    How to Deal with Kant's Racism—In and Out of the Classroom.Victor Fabian Abundez-Guerra - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):117-135.
    The question of how we should engage with a philosopher’s racial thought is of particular importance when considering Kant, who can be viewed as particularly representative of Enlightenment philosophy. In this article I argue that we should take a stance of deep acknowledgment when considering Kant’s work both inside and outside the classroom. Taking a stance of deep acknowledgment should be understood as 1) taking Kant’s racial thought to be reflective of his moral character, 2) Kant being accountable for his (...)
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  20.  8
    Chinese Philosophy: A Reader, by James Ryan.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):205-207.
  21.  7
    Teaching Philosophy of the City.Gerald J. Erion - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):137-150.
    This paper reviews goals, content materials, and other essential elements of a new, experimental philosophy course on the built environment of cities now being developed in Buffalo, New York. Applying traditional philosophical methods, the course adds experiential components and expands philosophy’s scope in ways that promote deep learning about the city. A model unit on the work of Frederick Law Olmsted receives special attention here, as Olmsted’s work in Buffalo and elsewhere invites philosophical treatment—analysis, critical examination, and so on—from scholars, (...)
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  22.  7
    "An Introduction to Moral Philosophy" and "Readings in Moral Philosophy," Both by Jonathan Wolff.Michael Goldman - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):207-212.
  23.  12
    What Is the Proper Content of a Course in Professional Ethics?Daniel F. Hartner - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):151-173.
    What is the proper content of a course in professional ethics, such as business ethics, engineering ethics, or medical ethics? Though courses in professional ethics have been present in colleges and universities for decades, the question remains largely unsettled, even among philosophers. This state of affairs helps to sustain and even exacerbate public misconceptions about ethics and professional ethical training in higher education. I argue that the proper content of such courses remains a potential source of confusion because the term (...)
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  24.  28
    Teaching Philosophy Through a Role-Immersion Game.Kathryn E. Joyce, Andy Lamey & Noel Martin - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):175-98.
    A growing body of research suggests that students achieve learning outcomes at higher rates when instructors use active-learning methods rather than standard modes of instruction. To investigate how one such method might be used to teach philosophy, we observed two classes that employed Reacting to the Past, an educational role-immersion game. We chose to investigate Reacting because role-immersion games are considered a particularly effective active-learning strategy. Professors who have used Reacting to teach history, interdisciplinary humanities, and political theory agree that (...)
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  25.  4
    Social and Political Philosophy: A Contemporary Introduction, 2nd Edition, by John Christman.John Rudisill - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):212-216.
  26.  99
    Wordmorph!Ian Stoner - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):199-204.
    Some logic students falter at the transition from the mechanical method of truth tables to the less-mechanical method of natural deduction. This short paper introduces a word game intended to ease that transition.
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  27.  10
    Strategies for Teaching Kant’s Metaphysics and Hume’s Skepticism in Survey Courses.C. D. Brewer - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (1):1-19.
    Teaching Kant’s metaphysics to undergraduates in a survey course can be quite challenging. Specifically, it can be daunting to motivate interest in Kant’s project and present his system in an accessible way in a short amount of time. Furthermore, comprehending some of the important features of his requires some understanding of Hume’s skepticism. Unfortunately, students often misunderstand the extent and relevance of Hume’s skepticism. Here, I offer three strategies for presenting Kant’s metaphysics as a response to Hume. First, I describe (...)
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  28.  16
    Integrating African Philosophy Into the Western Philosophy Curriculum.Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (1):21-43.
    In the last three years, there has been a worldwide increase in integrating African philosophy into the philosophy curricula. Nevertheless, given that African philosophy has been largely neglected by Western academia, many philosophers in the West who do wish to integrate it are unaware of how to do it. This article aims at addressing this issue by offering some recommendations on how to integrate African philosophy into the curricula. Particularly, it offers recommendations based on how the history of ancient philosophy, (...)
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  29.  5
    Socratic Dialogue Outside the Classroom.James Lee - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (1):45-63.
    Socratic dialogue is widely recognized as an effective teaching tool inside of the classroom. In this paper I will argue that Socratic dialogue is also a highly effective teaching tool outside of the classroom. I will argue that Socratic dialogue is highly effective outside of the classroom because it is a form of learning based assessment. I will also show how instructors can use technology like email to implement Socratic dialogue as a form of teaching and assessment, and thus offer (...)
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  30. Twenty-One Statements About Political Philosophy: An Introduction and Commentary on the State of the Profession.Mark R. Reiff - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (1):65-115.
    While the volume of material inspired by Rawls’s reinvigoration of the discipline back in 1971 has still not begun to subside, its significance has been in serious decline for quite some time. New and important work is appearing less and less frequently, while the scope of the work that is appearing is getting smaller and more internal and its practical applications more difficult to discern. The discipline has reached a point of intellectual stagnation, even as real-world events suggest that the (...)
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