Year:

  1.  11
    This Is Epistemology: An Introduction, by J. Adam Carter and Clayton Littlejohn.Matthew Carlson - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):239-242.
  2.  4
    Applying Critical Thinking to Modern Media: Effective Reasoning About Claims in the New Media Landscape, by Lewis Vaughn.Gong Chen - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):243-245.
  3.  3
    Reading Plato’s Dialogues to Enhance Learning and Inquiry: Exploring Socrates’ Use of Protreptic for Student Engagement, by Mason Marshall.Robert S. Colter - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):245-248.
  4.  3
    Teaching Medical Ethics Through Medical Law.Christopher Cowley - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):139-152.
    Medical ethics is normally taught in a combination of three ways: through discussions of normative theories and principles; through for-and-against debating of topics; or through case studies. I want to argue that a fourth approach might be better, and should be used more: teaching medical ethics through medical law. Medical law is already deeply imbued with ethical concepts, principles and reasons, and allows the discussion of ethics through the “back door,” as it were. The two greatest advantages of the law (...)
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  5.  5
    Marx and Digital Machines: Alienation, Technology, Capitalism, by Mike Healy.John Kinsey - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):249-250.
  6.  5
    A Guide to Good Reasoning: Cultivating Intellectual Virtues, 2nd Ed.. By David Carl Wilson; Introduction to Philosophy: Logic, Edited by Benjamin Martin; A Concise Introduction to Logic, by Craig DeLancey.Stephen M. Nelson - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):251-258.
  7.  1
    Teaching Students Some Cognitive Science to Evaluate Weird Perceptual Experiences.Robert Schroer - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):153-180.
    How can we use what cognitive science has taught us about perception to improve the critical thinking skills of our students? What, for instance, does it tell us about subjects who think they’ve seen Bigfoot, ghosts, and other “weird things”? I explore two approaches for giving students some empirically based tools for examining cases like these. The first, which I call the “we see what we want to see” approach, focuses the idea that beliefs and desires can shape our visual (...)
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  8.  2
    Philosophers in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching, Edited by Steven M. Cahn, Alexandra Bradner, and Andrew P. Mills.Anne-Marie Schultz - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):258-262.
  9.  5
    Bots and Beasts: What Makes Machines, Animals, and People Smart, by Paul Thagard.Brendan Shea - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):263-266.
  10.  3
    Bodies of Knowledge.Penny Weiss - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):181-207.
    I developed a first-day exercise for my interdisciplinary “Feminist Epistemology” class that calms students’ fears about what they imagine will be the unduly abstract course content, and engages them in easy but revealing conversation about knowledge. Individually and then together, we explore metaphors and proverbs about knowing body parts and bodily images of knowledge that have the potential to teach us something about knowledge itself. From “the nose knows” to having “seminal ideas” to being a “birdbrain,” expressions reveal how we (...)
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  11.  4
    Reclaiming Reasoning.Katharine Wolfe - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):209-237.
    This article traces my own pedagogical journey to find strategies for teaching critical thinking that emphasize intellectual cooperation, empathy, and argument repair, a journey that found me frequently turning to sources outside of philosophy, including work in intergroup dialogue and pedagogical work in rhetoric and composition. Theoretically, the article showcases Maureen Linker’s notion of ‘cooperative reasoning’, sets it against the ‘adversary paradigm’ Janice Moulton critiques, and illustrates how Peter Elbow’s challenges to critical thinking as a ‘doubting game’ resonate with Linker’s (...)
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  12.  8
    Two Years of Specifications Grading in Philosophy.Dennis Earl - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):23-64.
    Points-based grading, though now traditional, faces powerful critiques: Such grading creates a low road to passing, it undermines motivation, it wastes time, and it causes stress. It creates an illusion of mathematical precision. It is unfriendly to necessary conditions for satisfactory performance. This paper defends the alternative of specifications grading. Specifications grading grades only on whether work meets a set of expectations for satisfactory performance, with the expectations set at a high but reachable level. With a high bar also comes (...)
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  13.  2
    Professions in Ethical Focus: An Anthology, 2nd Edition Edited by Fritz Allhoff, Jonathan Milgrim, and Anand J. Vaidya.Bryce Gessell - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):105-107.
  14.  2
    Beyond Philosophy, by Nancy Tuana and Charles E. Scott.Douglas Giles - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):108-111.
    A critical review of the book, "Beyond Philosophy," assessing the authors' argument with an eye toward the book's usefulness for educators in art theory and intersectional philosophy courses.
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  15.  6
    Creating Reflective Engagement.William Goodwin - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):65-85.
    This paper describes an approach to teaching the philosophy of science to science students that was developed in a context where the course is a lower-level requirement for all natural science majors. This audience made it appropriate to reconsider standard approaches to the field and resulted in an innovative pedagogical strategy subsequently used, in modified form, in more traditional philosophical contexts. This paper describes the pedagogical approach, explains reasons for it, motivates more specific ways of enacting it, and assess its (...)
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  16.  7
    Making Philosophy of Language Classes Relevant and Inclusive.Theresa Helke - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):87-104.
    In this article, I present a philosophy-of-language assignment which emerges as the hero in a fable with the following trio of villains:ness, Parroting, and Boredom. Building on Penny Weiss’s “Making History of Ideas Classes Relevant”, and serving students taking an introductory course which covers Western theories of meaning, the “You are there” essay conquers Abstractness by requiring students to make a connection between the material and their lives, rendering theories relevant. It conquers Parroting by requiring them to apply theories to (...)
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  17.  7
    Animal Ethics: A Contemporary Introduction, by Bob Fischer.Jacquelyn Ann Kegley - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):112-115.
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  18.  1
    How Humans Judge Machines, by Cesar A. Hidalgo, Diana Orghian, Jordi Albo Canals, Filipa De Almeida, and Natalia Martin.Steven Kelts - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):115-119.
  19.  3
    Propositions for Non-Fascist Living: Tentative and Urgent. Edited by Maria Hlavajova and Wietske Maas.John Kinsey - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):119-121.
  20.  8
    Sapientia: Open Readings in Philosophy, Edited by Henry Imler.George Matthews - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):121-124.
  21. Philosophical Method: A Very Short Introduction, by Timothy Williamson. [REVIEW] Neminemus & I. Neminemus - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):124-127.
  22.  3
    The Subversive Simone Weil: A Life in Five Ideas, by Robert Zaretsky.Janelle Pötzsch - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):128-130.
  23.  10
    Philosophy’s Big Questions: Comparing Buddhist and Western Approaches. Edited by Steven M. Emmanuel.Daniel Shaw - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):130-134.
  24.  3
    AI and Humanity, by Llah Reza Nourbakhsh and Jennifer Keating.Patrick F. Walsh - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (1):134-137.
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