Year:

  1. Rorty, Irony and the Consequences of Contingency for Liberal Society.Michael Bacon - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):953-965.
    This article examines Richard Rorty’s much criticized figure of the ironist, and the role that it plays in liberal society. It argues that, against Rorty’s own presentation, irony might have positive social consequences. It does so by examining Rorty’s description of the ironist, arguing that it contains different ideas which emerge at different points in Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity. It takes up William Curtis’ claim that irony is a civic virtue, one closely associated with liberal ideas such as tolerance and (...)
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  2.  3
    White Nationalism, Armed Culture and State Violence in the Age of Donald Trump.A. Giroux Henry - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):887-910.
    With the election of Donald Trump to the presidency of the United States, the discourse of an authoritarianism and the echoes of a fascist past have moved from the margins to the center of American politics. A culture of war buttressed by the forces of white supremacy and militarization has been unleashed in a series of policies designed to return the United States to a history in which the public sphere was largely white and Christian, and the economy and the (...)
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  3.  1
    Neo-Liberalism and Other Political Imaginaries.Noëlle McAfee - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):911-931.
    This article looks at how various political cultures and imaginaries occlude the public’s deeply democratic political role, especially the currently reigning anti-political culture of neo-liberalism. Even in an era when millions of people the world over take to the streets in protest, dominant political imaginaries position most of the world’s people as largely powerless. What is needed is a radical political imaginary along the lines that Cornelius Castoriadis suggests. This imaginary foregrounds the ways in which all social and political formations (...)
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  4.  1
    Two Ways of Being a Left-Heideggerian.Kurt C. M. Mertel - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (9):966-984.
    This article is concerned with the question of the relative priority between political and social ontology within left-Heideggerianism, a tradition recently reconstructed by Oliver Marchart. Although the title seems to imply that this question is an open and live one within left-Heideggerianism – that the two paths at the crossroads have been clearly delineated when, in fact, the current predicament of left-Heideggerianism resembles more a one-way street – this is somewhat misleading: the identification of left-Heideggerianism with a post-foundationalist political ontology (...)
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  5.  2
    Doing Justice to the Past.Jean-Philippe Deranty & Andrew Dunstall - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):812-836.
    In this article, we argue that the usual restriction of critical theory to ‘modern’ norms is subject to problems of coherence, historical accuracy and moral obligation. First, we illustrate how critical theory opposes itself to societies designated as pre-modern, through a summary of Honneth’s recognition theory. We then show how an over-emphasis on modernity’s normative novelty obscures counter-currents in ethical life that threaten the unity of the modern era. Those two steps prepare the main analysis: that the ‘exceptionalist’ modernism of (...)
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  6.  3
    Adorno’s ‘Addendum’.Jaffe Aaron - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):855-876.
    Adorno’s ‘addendum’ names the experience by which socially constrained agents are jolted into resistance against their suffering. The impulse to action is simultaneously intra-mental and somatic, and thus forms the locus of a jointly conscious and bodily impetus to confronting the ideological and material forces that produce contemporary unfreedom. In this way the ‘addendum’ is a historically developing, indeterminate, yet inexhaustible glimmer of hope for both agents and theorists who make social suffering central to their critical analysis. This article explores (...)
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  7.  2
    Review Essay: Continue the Rawlsian Project After Rawls.Zhuoyao Li - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):877-883.
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  8. Review Essay: Continue the Rawlsian Project After Rawls. [REVIEW]Zhuoyao Li - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):877-883.
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  9. Narrative and Recognition in the Flesh.Gonçalo Marcelo - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):777-792.
    In this interview, conducted by Gonçalo Marcelo, Richard Kearney recaps his intellectual trajectory, commenting on his early works on imagination and his own narrative style of doing philosophy in order then to make explicit the deep connection between the more recent developments of Carnal Hermeneutics, Reimagining the Sacred and the work done with others in the context of the Guestbook Project. Drawing on some lesser-known aspects of his work, he emphasizes the carnal dimension of recognition and discusses the pitfalls of (...)
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  10. Infinity, Infinite Processes and Limit Concepts.Piet Strydom - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (8):793-811.
    This article seeks to recover a neglected chapter in the historical and theoretical background of social theory in general and critical theory in particular with a view to refining the understanding of the presuppositions of a cognitively enhanced critical social science appropriate to our troubled times. For this purpose, it offers a brief reconstruction of the mathematical-philosophical tradition from ancient to modern times by extrapolating that part of it that is marked by the ideas of infinity, infinite processes and limit (...)
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  11.  2
    Society is Not a Text: On the Value of Metaphor for the Critique of Ideology.Jordi Cabos - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):685-706.
    The question of how meaning serves to sustain dominance has been part of the programme of a critique of ideology from the outset. If ideology makes the meaning of the social world and its interpretations decontested, a main task of the critique of ideology is to show their contestability. I would like to reconsider the value of metaphor within this programme and claim that metaphors are noteworthy devices for the critique of ideology due to their ability to undermine ideological incontestability: (...)
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  12. Society is Not a Text: On the Value of Metaphor for the Critique of Ideology.Jordi Cabos - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):685-706.
    The question of how meaning serves to sustain dominance has been part of the programme of a critique of ideology from the outset. If ideology makes the meaning of the social world and its interpretations decontested, a main task of the critique of ideology is to show their contestability. I would like to reconsider the value of metaphor within this programme and claim that metaphors are noteworthy devices for the critique of ideology due to their ability to undermine ideological incontestability: (...)
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  13.  1
    Persisting Pan-Institutional Racism: The Allegedly New Good Refashions the Old Bad.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):748-774.
    Which types of group-typing amounts to racism? The answer seemingly has to do with deeper physical or cultural traits over which an agent has no deliberate control but which are formative of the agent. In this article, I look to the cultural or ethnic bases of division of humans into races, albeit of a specific type: a basis that sees humanity climbing in a certain, presumably improving, direction. Those ethnicities that appear not to opt for this climb are commonly presumed (...)
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  14.  2
    A Tale of Two Demoi: Boundaries and Democracy Beyond the Sovereign Point of View.Brian Milstein - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):724-747.
    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of debate re what democratic theory has to say about the boundaries of democratic peoples. Yet the debate over the ‘democratic boundary problem’ has been hindered by the way contributors work with different understandings of democracy, of democratic legitimacy and of what it means to participate in a demos. My argument is that these conceptual issues can be clarified if we recognize that the ‘demos’ constitutive of democracy is essentially dual in character: it must (...)
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  15. A Justification of Whistleblowing.Daniele Santoro & Manohar Kumar - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):669-684.
    Whistleblowing is the act of disclosing information from a public or private organization in order to reveal cases of corruption that are of immediate or potential danger to the public. Blowing the whistle involves personal risk, especially when legal protection is absent, and charges of betrayal, which often come in the form of legal prosecution under treason laws. In this article we argue that whistleblowing is justified when disclosures are made with the proper intent and fulfill specific communicative constraints in (...)
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  16.  1
    Political Inertia and Social Acceleration.Bart Zantvoort - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (7):707-723.
    There is a complicated relation between social and political inertia – the failure of institutions to respond adequately to social, technological and environmental change – and social acceleration – the tendency of social change to go faster and faster. Social stasis and acceleration are not simply opposed but also causally related. This article contrasts two theories of political and social inertia. Francis Fukuyama argues that political inertia is a result of a cognitive and institutional rigidity which is ultimately grounded in (...)
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  17.  3
    The Perpetual Peace Puzzle: Kant on Persons and States.Ben Holland - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):599-620.
    Kant described the state as a ‘moral person’, and did so when dealing with international relations. For all the interest in his contribution to the theory of global politics, the locution according to which Kant characterized the state has received very little attention. When notice has been taken of it, the moral personality of the state has moved arguments in opposing directions. On one recent reading, when Kant called the state a moral person he intended to indicate that it possessed (...)
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  18.  2
    The Perpetual Peace Puzzle.Ben Holland - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):599-620.
    Kant described the state as a ‘moral person’, and did so when dealing with international relations. For all the interest in his contribution to the theory of global politics, the locution according to which Kant characterized the state has received very little attention. When notice has been taken of it, the moral personality of the state has moved arguments in opposing directions. On one recent reading, when Kant called the state a moral person he intended to indicate that it possessed (...)
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  19.  3
    Political Toleration, Exclusionary Reasoning and the Extraordinary Politics.Armin Khameh - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):646-666.
    Western societies today are marked by a broad liberal consensus in favor of toleration. Yet, some philosophers have charged that political toleration as a liberal ideal is incoherent. Some have argued that toleration is incompatible with liberal political orders due to egalitarian considerations. Others have suggested that in a truly liberal society, where the state’s justice-based duties of non-interference are the most appropriate response to diversity, political toleration is practically redundant. This article defends political toleration against the above allegations. My (...)
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  20.  6
    Towards an Ethical Politics: T. W. Adorno and Aesthetic Self-Relinquishment.Kathy Kiloh - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):571-598.
    Jürgen Habermas’ characterization of Adorno’s project as an aestheticization of philosophy continues to influence our reading of his work. In contradiction to Lambert Zuidervaart, who suggests that in order to be understood as politically relevant, Adorno’s philosophy must be supplemented with empirical research, I argue in this article that Adorno’s work contains many of the resources we would need to theorize an ethical politics. First, it both identifies the moral debt carried by the subject and addresses the need for social (...)
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  21.  3
    Towards an Ethical Politics.Kathy Kiloh - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):571-598.
  22.  10
    The Politics of Religious Freedom: Liberalism and Toleration in Muslim-Majority States.Jon Mahoney - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):551-570.
    The aim of this article is to consider the prospects of a liberal conception of religious freedom in some Muslim-majority states. Part I offers a brief sketch of three approaches to religious freedom that inform my view. Part II then presents a liberal framework for religious toleration that draws ideas from Rainer Forst’s Toleration in Conflict, as well as some perennial themes in classical liberal thought. I briefly examine three case studies in Part III: the Turkish Republic; the Arab Spring (...)
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  23.  4
    The Politics of Religious Freedom.Jon Mahoney - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):551-570.
    The aim of this article is to consider the prospects of a liberal conception of religious freedom in some Muslim-majority states. Part I offers a brief sketch of three approaches to religious freedom that inform my view. Part II then presents a liberal framework for religious toleration that draws ideas from Rainer Forst’s Toleration in Conflict, as well as some perennial themes in classical liberal thought. I briefly examine three case studies in Part III: the Turkish Republic; the Arab Spring (...)
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  24.  10
    Libertarian Personal Responsibility: On the Ethics, Practice, and American Politics of Personal Responsibility.Joshua Preiss - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):621-645.
    While libertarians affirm personal responsibility as a central moral and political value, libertarian theorists write relatively little about the theory and practice of this value. Focusing on the work of F. A. Hayek and David Schmidtz, this article identifies the core of a libertarian approach to personal responsibility and demonstrates the ways in which this approach entails a radical revision of the ethics and American politics of personal responsibility. Then, I highlight several central implications of this analysis in the American (...)
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  25.  13
    Libertarian Personal Responsibility.Joshua Preiss - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (6):621-645.
    While libertarians affirm personal responsibility as a central moral and political value, libertarian theorists write relatively little about the theory and practice of this value. Focusing on the work of F. A. Hayek and David Schmidtz, this article identifies the core of a libertarian approach to personal responsibility and demonstrates the ways in which this approach entails a radical revision of the ethics and American politics of personal responsibility. Then, I highlight several central implications of this analysis in the American (...)
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  26.  5
    Looking Beyond ‘Imaginary’ Analytics and Hermeneutics in Comparative Politics.Murat Akan - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):484-494.
    Multiple modernities has emerged as the post-Huntingtonian paradigm in the study of secularism and religion, and the concepts ‘imaginary’ or ‘verstehen’ are the most common candidates guiding research aiming to articulate this multiplicity. This article revisits Shmuel Eisenstadt’s original ‘Multiple Modernities’ thesis, Charles Taylor’s concept ‘imaginary’ and Max Weber’s ‘verstehen’, and offers concise examples on how they are put into practice in the current literature on secularism and religion. I argue that the original Eisenstadt thesis is built upon interactions of (...)
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  27.  10
    Lifestyle and Rights: A Neo-Secular Conception of Human Dignity.Ahmet Murat Aytaç - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):495-502.
    The challenges facing the life-worlds of political societies in the Islamic world require a radical shift of perspective that can improve our understanding of the contemporary situation of human rights politics. Not only the classical formulation of secularism, which aims at liberating the public sphere from domination of ‘the sacred’, but also the political-theological approach, which addresses the problems of modernity within the context of a disguised and refurbished dominance of ‘the transcendence’, suffer from and share a basic insufficiency in (...)
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  28.  4
    Lifestyle and Rights: A Neo-Secular Conception of Human Dignity.Ahmet Murat Aytaç - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):495-502.
    The challenges facing the life-worlds of political societies in the Islamic world require a radical shift of perspective that can improve our understanding of the contemporary situation of human rights politics. Not only the classical formulation of secularism, which aims at liberating the public sphere from domination of ‘the sacred’, but also the political-theological approach, which addresses the problems of modernity within the context of a disguised and refurbished dominance of ‘the transcendence’, suffer from and share a basic insufficiency in (...)
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  29.  3
    On Strongmen’s Trail.Zygmunt Bauman - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):383-391.
    Zygmunt Bauman addresses the question to what extent today's resurgence of populism and nationalism is an appropriate answer to the very concrete loss of economic, social but also cultural security. He argues that the populist, nationalist and religious promises are no longer in a position to counter effectively and truly the multifarious problems people face today. Postmodern individualization and globalization undermine any possibility for an identitarian and nationalist solution to the loss of security. Only a political approach that takes into (...)
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  30.  4
    Turkey’s ‘Liberal’ Liberals.Murat Borovali - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):406-416.
    This article seeks to address the increasingly pertinent concern of how to form a satisfactory liberal stance in the face of certain democratically mandated policies of non-liberal and even sometimes illiberal governments. To that end, a close analysis is provided of a particular debate that generated controversy in certain liberal circles in Turkey during the run-up to the referendum on constitutional amendments in 2010. Identifying and evaluating 5 factors which seemed to have influenced the opposing positions in the debate, the (...)
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  31.  2
    The International Order and the Persistence of ‘Violent Extremism’ in the Islamic World.Can Cemgil - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):529-538.
    This article explores the relation between the American-led liberal international order and the persistence of ‘violent extremism’ in the Middle East through a questioning of the role of constitutive aspects of this order, namely territoriality of political organization and capitalist organization of world economy, in contributing to the persistence and recurrent formation of militant Islamist groups. It argues that the historical legitimation crisis of this international order in the Middle East and the other conflict-ridden regions of the Islamic world, and (...)
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  32.  5
    Unintelligible! Inaccessible! Unacceptable! Are Religious Truth Claims a Problem for Liberal Democracies?Maeve Cooke - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):442-452.
    In liberal democracies it is now a commonplace that public debates in the institutionalized political sphere should involve only arguments and reasons that are in principle intelligible, accessible and acceptable to all citizens. Many political theorists take the view that religious arguments and reasons do not meet these requirements. My article interrogates this widely held position, considering each of the three requirements in turn. Motivating my discussion is the view that religious beliefs and practices should not be regarded as essentially (...)
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  33.  1
    Islamic Thought and the Public Sphere: A Synthesis.Moh’D. Khair Eiedat - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):503-513.
    For the purpose of clarity I offer an operational definition of Islamic thought which is Sunni-based. The public sphere is placed in the context of deliberative politics as an ethical frame in which the following elements are assumed: freedom, equality, reciprocity, reasoning, choice, fraternity and solidarity. Three Islamic models are identified: model, the Sufi/individualist model; model, shariah-legal-religious nationalism; and model, the ethical model. Model is taken to be the most relevant to the notion of deliberative politics. The implications of model (...)
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  34.  6
    The Danger of Compartmentalization: An Analysis of the Relationship Between Theology and Politics Through the Prism of the Right to Freedom of Religion.Silvio Ferrari - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):465-473.
    This article argues that we cannot separate theology on the one hand and politics, law and economy on the other when trying to understand how to deal with religious and cultural diversity. Through an historical examination of the formation of the right to religious liberty in the West, it shows that the European secular state is still deeply indebted with its theological presuppositions. This conclusion explains why systems of religiously based personal regimes are much less widespread in Europe than in (...)
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  35.  1
    Egypt After the 2013 Military Coup: Law-Making in Service of the New Authoritarianism.Amr Hamzawy - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):392-405.
    The military coup was staged in the summer of 2013. In the intervening period, Egypt’s ruling generals have succeeded in handcuffing the public space and bringing back fear as an everyday feature of life in a country that is still in dire straits. By various repressive measures, civilians have learned to fear the consequences of free expression and peaceful opposition. To this end as well, Egypt’s ruling generals have also adapted legal and legislative tools to persecute political enemies and eradicate (...)
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  36.  1
    Religion, Rights and the Public Sphere.Volker Kaul - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):376-382.
    The article introduces to the issue of religion, rights and the public sphere. It analyzes 4 challenges that the conception of the public sphere currently faces: Does there exists a trade-off between the public sphere and a legal regime of civil rights? Does the public sphere really require us to keep the good and religious questions outside of it? To what extent is the public sphere neutral and not rather itself the outcome of a particular and contingent conception of the (...)
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  37.  1
    Social and Political Roles of the Armenian Clergy From the Late Ottoman Era to the Turkish Republic.Ohannes Kılıçdağı - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):539-547.
    This article examines the treatment of Armenians by the late Ottoman and Turkish republican state with a special focus on the social and political roles of the Armenian clergy, especially the patriarch. After giving a brief account of the historical evolution of the millet system – the principles and practices applied by the Ottoman state in its treatments of non-Muslims – the article tries to understand whether the new regime kept it or adopted a modern approach during the transition from (...)
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  38.  3
    Citizens in Robes: The Place of Religion in Constitutional Democracies.Cristina Lafont - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):453-464.
    The normative place of religion in liberal democracies is as contested as ever. This contestation produces understandable fears that liberal democratic institutions may ultimately be incompatible with religious forms of life. If this is so, if there is genuinely no hope that secular and religious citizens can equally take ownership over and identify with these institutions, then the future of democracy within pluralist societies seems seriously threatened. These fears commonly arise in debates concerning the liberal criterion of democratic legitimacy, according (...)
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  39. From the Moral to the Political: The Question of Political Legitimacy in Non-Western Societies.David M. Rasmussen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):430-441.
    This article focuses on the problem of political legitimacy: first, by finding it to be the driving force in the Rawlsian paradigm moving from a focus on the moral to one on the political; second, with the help of a consideration of multiple-modernities theory, by arguing for a version of political liberalism freed of its western framework; and third, by applying that framework to current debates over the meaning of democracy in a Confucian context.
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  40.  1
    Erratum.David M. Rasmussen, Volker Kaul & Alessandro Ferrara - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):548-548.
    Vernon, Jim, ‘A passion for justice’: Martin Luther King, Jr. and G. W. F. Hegel on ‘world-historical individuals’, Philosophy & Social Criticism, 43 February 2017 pp. 187–207, DOI 10.1177/0191453716680126 SAGE regrets that an error in the title of this article was included in the original publication. Subsequent online versions of this article will be corrected.
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  41.  1
    Michel Houellebecq’s Shifting Representation of Islam: From the Death of God to Counter-Enlightenment.Camil Ungureanu - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):514-528.
    Michel Houellebecq has, I argue, changed significantly his portrayal of Islam: in earlier novels, he advances a hostile view of it premised on the secularist belief in the death of God and the inexorable decline of monotheism. Houellebecq sets capitalism against Islam, and advances a vision of a godless ‘religion positive’ better suited for capitalist modernity. In contrast, in his last novel and interventions, Houellebecq makes a post-secular turn largely driven by the radicalization of positivist ideas relying on evolutionary biology. (...)
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  42.  1
    Denaturalization and Denationalization in Comparison.Patrick Weil - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):417-429.
    Denaturalization and denationalization were once much more common among western democracies. From 1906 till 1968, the United States of America, France and the United Kingdom denationalized their citizens by hundreds and thousands, for fraud or illegality during the process of naturalization, for dual citizenship, or for banal default of loyalty. In a context of a ‘war against terror’ we are now seeing an apparent return to the past – with the resuming of denationalization policies and provisions. However, the previous restriction (...)
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  43.  3
    Unveiling the Religious Motives in Radical Social Critique.Znepolski Boyan - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):474-483.
    This article aims to study the present-day disarray of radical social critique, as represented by Alain Badiou and Slavoj Žižek, which lacks reliable mainstays in contemporary societies and therefore resorts to religion in order to justify the universality of its revolutionary project. Emphasizing the opposition between particularity and universality, both Badiou and Žižek reject religion as a cultural particularity, attempting at the same time to discover in religion the symbolic codifications of the universal experience of a radical social change. Precisely (...)
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  44.  3
    Prague: Twenty Years Later.Amy Allen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):270-271.
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  45.  2
    Through the Iron Curtain, Stuck Halfway Down.Albena Azmanova - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):294-295.
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  46.  1
    My Prague.Banu Bargu - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):341-342.
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  47.  3
    Dubrovnik, Prague, Praxis International and Constellations: Intertwined Fates.Seyla Benhabib - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):249-249.
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  48.  3
    The Prehistory of the Prague Meetings.Richard J. Bernstein - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):272-273.
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  49.  1
    Siding with Modernity.Matteo Bianchin - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):327-328.
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  50.  1
    Building a Symbiosis of Praxis and Theory in Normative Political Philosophy.Daniel Blanch - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):347-348.
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  51. From Italy to New York, Via Prague: The Passion for Critique.Chiara Bottici - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):318-318.
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  52.  1
    Observing Communicative Competences.Hubertus Buchstein - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):252-253.
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  53.  1
    Critical Theory and Practices of Life.Marina Calloni - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):314-315.
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  54.  2
    Outsider–Insider’s Perspectives.Dario Castiglione - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):292-293.
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  55.  5
    Mind the ‘And’: Prague, Philosophy and Social Sciences.Robin Celikates - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):337-338.
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  56.  4
    Community, Leadership and Continuity.Simone Chambers - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):296-297.
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  57.  2
    Reflections on the Dubrovnik/Prague Seminars.Jean L. Cohen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):243-244.
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  58.  2
    Philosophy and the Social Sciences: Reflections on a Meeting.Maeve Cooke - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):260-261.
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  59.  1
    The Multiple Identities of Critical Theory: A Hydra or a Proteus?Claudio Corradetti - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):306-307.
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  60.  1
    The Idea of a Good Life.Paolo Costa - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):333-334.
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  61.  1
    The Irreplaceable Presence of Prague in My Life.Pieter Duvenage - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):290-291.
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  62.  1
    What is ‘Critical’ About Critical Theory?Eva Erman - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):300-301.
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  63.  2
    The Prague Conference: Directors, General Themes, Plenaries, Workshops, Papers.Alessandro Ferrara - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):355-372.
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  64.  1
    The Secret Underneath a Success Story.Alessandro Ferrara - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):247-248.
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  65.  3
    Prague, or Critical Theory in the 21st Century.Alessandro Ferrara - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):235-242.
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  66. The Next Big Thing.Robert Fine - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):278-279.
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  67.  5
    The Geist of an Impossible Conference.Rainer Forst - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):262-263.
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  68.  3
    A Tale of Two Cities – and Three Generations.Nancy Fraser - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):264-265.
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  69.  2
    Prague Matters.Barbara Fultner - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):308-309.
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  70.  6
    An Intellectual Laboratory for the Democratic and Cosmopolitan Left.Pablo Gilabert - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):329-330.
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  71.  2
    Prague, Villa Lanna and a Changing Europe.John Holmwood - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):316-317.
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  72.  4
    Recollections of a Transition.Axel Honneth - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):245-246.
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  73.  1
    The Conference From the Prague Perspective.Marek Hrubec - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):256-257.
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  74.  3
    My Critical Time in Prague: Reminiscence Not Theory.David Ingram - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):331-332.
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  75.  1
    Five Years of Being at Home in the Academic World.Marjan Ivković - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):349-350.
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  76.  2
    Discourse, but Also Dancing.Matthias Kettner - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):282-283.
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  77.  2
    My First Time.Regina Kreide - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):323-324.
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  78.  1
    The Prague Colloquium: The Heart, Spirit, Home of Critical Theorists.María Pía Lara - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):268-269.
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  79. Next Year in Prague!Øjvind Larsen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):312-313.
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  80.  1
    Rationality, Democracy, Crisis and Emancipation.Miriam M. S. Madureira - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):325-326.
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  81.  1
    Memories of Prague.Johanna Meehan - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):304-305.
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  82.  1
    At the Liberal Edge in Prague.Frank I. Michelman - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):254-255.
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  83.  3
    The Diversity and Unity of Critical Theory in Prague.Brian Milstein - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):335-336.
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  84.  1
    Prague – a 21st-Century Salon and Beyond?Lenny Moss - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):284-285.
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  85.  3
    Prague Memories.David Owen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):319-320.
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  86.  2
    New Old Prague.Max Pensky - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):310-311.
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  87.  2
    Dubrovnik and Prague.David M. Rasmussen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):276-277.
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  88.  1
    Power Struggles and Friendships: Prague’s Mysteries.Hartmut Rosa - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):258-259.
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  89.  2
    Critical Theory and Critical Theories.Martin Saar - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):298-299.
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  90.  3
    Pigeon-Holing Prague?William E. Scheuerman - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):266-267.
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  91.  1
    The Limits of Reason and the Prague Conference.Steven Shiffrin - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):302-303.
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  92.  1
    Rooted in the Future: Prague Between Tradition and Innovation.Debora Spini - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):339-340.
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  93.  3
    The Location of Critique.Titus Stahl - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):351-352.
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  94.  1
    The Prague Conference: Fostering Critical Social Theory Through Inspiration and Limitation.David Strecker - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):353-354.
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  95.  2
    The Privilege of Participation.Asger Sørensen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):286-287.
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  96.  6
    Our Evolving Agenda.Charles Taylor - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):274-275.
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  97.  1
    Reshaping the Geopolitics of Critical Theory.Testa Italo - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):321-322.
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  98.  2
    A Dialectical View of Prague.Mathias Thaler - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):343-344.
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  99.  2
    A Note From the East.Camil Ungureanu - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):345-346.
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  100.  1
    Maintaining and Enriching a Tradition.Stephen K. White - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):280-281.
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  101.  1
    A Recurrent Prague Spring.Steven L. Winter - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):288-289.
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  102.  6
    The Catastrophe of Neo-Liberalism: Finance, Emancipation and Disintegration.Roger Foster - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):123-143.
    My article provides a systematic interpretation of the transformation of capitalist society in the neo-liberal era as a form of what Karl Polanyi called ‘cultural catastrophe’. I substantiate this claim by drawing upon Erich Fromm’s theory of social character. Fromm’s notion of social character, I argue, offers a plausible, psychodynamic explanation of the processes of social change and the eventual class composition of neo-liberal society. I argue, further, that Fromm allows us to understand the psychosocial basis of the process that (...)
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  103.  9
    The Catastrophe of Neo-Liberalism.Roger Foster - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):123-143.
    My article provides a systematic interpretation of the transformation of capitalist society in the neo-liberal era as a form of what Karl Polanyi called ‘cultural catastrophe’. I substantiate this claim by drawing upon Erich Fromm’s theory of social character. Fromm’s notion of social character, I argue, offers a plausible, psychodynamic explanation of the processes of social change and the eventual class composition of neo-liberal society. I argue, further, that Fromm allows us to understand the psychosocial basis of the process that (...)
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  104.  21
    Idealism and the Metaphysics of Individuality.Paul Giladi - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):208-229.
    What is arguably the central criticism of Hegel’s philosophical system by the Continental tradition, a criticism which represents a unifying thread in the diverse work of Schelling, Feuerbach, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Adorno, is that Hegel fails to adequately do justice to the notion of individuality. My aim in this paper is to counter the claim that Hegel’s idea of the concrete universal fails to properly explain the real uniqueness of individuals. In what follows, I argue that whilst the Continental critique (...)
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  105.  11
    Secrecy, Transparency and Government Whistleblowing.William H. Harwood - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):164-186.
    In the first part of the 21st century, the complicated relationship between transparency and security reached a boiling point with revelations of extra-judicial CIA activities, near universal NSA monitoring and unprecedented whistleblowing – and prosecution of whistleblowers under the Espionage Act. This article examines the dual necessities of security and transparency for any democracy, and the manner in which whistleblowers radically saddle this Janus-faced relationship. Then I will move to contemporary examples of whistleblowing, showing how and why some prove more (...)
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  106.  5
    Living À la Mode.Sergei Prozorov - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):144-163.
    The publication of The Use of Bodies, the final volume in Giorgio Agamben’s Homo Sacer series, makes it possible to take stock of Agamben’s project as a whole. Having started with a powerful critique of the biopolitical sovereignty as the essence of modern politics, Agamben concludes his project with an affirmative vision of inoperative politics of form-of-life, in which life is not negated or sacrificed to the privileged form it must attain, but rather remains inseparable from the form that does (...)
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  107.  7
    A Passion for Justice’: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s and G. W. F. Hegel on ‘World-Historical Individuals.Jim Vernon - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):187-207.
    In this article, I explicate Martin Luther King, Jr.’s account of emancipatory history and activism by examining the influence of G. W. F. Hegel’s account of world-historical individuals on his thought. Both thinkers, I argue, affirm that history’s spiritual destiny works through individuals who are driven by the contingencies of their subjective character and given situation to undertake particular actions, and yet who nevertheless freely and decisively break the new from the old by forsaking subjective satisfaction to spur events forward (...)
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  108.  2
    A Passion for Justice.Jim Vernon - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):187-207.
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  109.  7
    ‘You Be My Body for Me’: Dispossession in Two Valences.Catherine Kellogg - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (1):83-95.
    Judith Butler and Catherine Malabou’s recent exchange, ‘You Be My Body for Me: Body, Shape and Plasticity in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit’, is remarkable because in their rereading of Hegel’s famous lord and bondsman parable, rather than focusing on recognition, work, or even desire, Butler and Malabou each wonder about how Hegel contributes to a new way of thinking about ‘having’ a body and how coming to ‘be’ a body necessarily involves a kind of dispossession. Butler and Malabou’s reading of (...)
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  110.  5
    Feminism and Rethinking Our Models of the Self.Johanna Meehan - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (1):3-33.
    In this article I argue that Butler and Benhabib work with models of the self that should be jettisoned. Butler relies on what I call the outside-to-inside model, while Benhabib shuttles between an outside-to-inside and an inside-to-outside model. Because of the inherent limitations of these models neither can do what both authors set out to do, which is to describe the ontogeny of the self. I trace their discussions over the course of their writings and then propose that the notion (...)
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  111.  5
    Dignity as Non-Discrimination: Existential Protests and Legal Claim-Making for Reproductive Rights.Wairimu Njoya - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (1):51-82.
    Analysing two reproductive rights claims brought before the High Court of Namibia and the European Court of Human Rights, this article argues that human dignity is not reducible to a recognized warrant to demand a particular set of goods, services, or treatments. Rather, dignity in the contexts in which women experience sterilization abuse would be better characterized as an existential protest against degradation, a protest that takes concrete form in legal demands for equal citizenship. Equality is conceived here as necessitating (...)
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  112.  9
    To What Question is the Badiouan Notion of the Subject an Answer? On the Dialectical Elaboration of the Concept in His Early Work.Jan-Jasper Persijn - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (1):96-120.
    Alain Badiou’s elaboration of a subject faithful to an event is commonly known today in the academic world and beyond. However, his first systematic account of the subject was already published in 1982 and did not mention the ‘event’ at all. Therefore, this article aims at tracing back both the structural and the historical conditions that directed Badiou’s elaboration of the subject in the early work up until the publication of L’Être et l’Événément in 1988. On the one hand, it (...)
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  113.  4
    Political Liberalism and Religious Claims: Four Blind Spots.Kristina Stoeckl - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (1):34-50.
    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either ‘liberal’ or ‘fundamentalist’ and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes (...)
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