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  1.  11
    Plural Reconstruction: A Method of Critical Theory for the Analysis of Emerging and Contested Political Practices.Svenja Ahlhaus - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):703-725.
    In this article, I argue that Habermas’s method of rational reconstruction faces limitations when it comes to analysing newly emerging and contested political practices. As rational reconstruction aims to criticize existing practices by determining their normative meaning as reflected in the participants’ idealizing presuppositions, it reaches its limits where emerging and contested practices make it impossible to identify a shared self-understanding and a single participants’ perspective. Using the example of membership politics, I argue that this is often the case where (...)
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  2.  8
    Homo Homini Tigris: Thomas Hobbes and the Global Images of Sovereignty.Sandro Chignola - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):726-754.
    This article addresses the modern concept of sovereignty as a multivocal and conflictual semantic field, arguing for the necessity to trace its genealogy based on the structural tensions that haunt its logical framework – as well as its representations – rather than on a linear historiographic reconstruction. In particular, the scrutiny I propose aims to examine a series of exchanges that have been characterizing this concept since the beginning: the global and the European, the maritime and the territorial, the colony (...)
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  3.  6
    Homo Homini Tigris: Thomas Hobbes and the Global Images of Sovereignty.Sandro Chignola - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):726-754.
    This article addresses the modern concept of sovereignty as a multivocal and conflictual semantic field, arguing for the necessity to trace its genealogy based on the structural tensions that haunt its logical framework – as well as its representations – rather than on a linear historiographic reconstruction. In particular, the scrutiny I propose aims to examine a series of exchanges that have been characterizing this concept since the beginning: the global and the European, the maritime and the territorial, the colony (...)
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  4.  48
    At the Bar of Conscience: A Kantian Argument for Slavery Reparations.Jason R. Fisette - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):674-702.
    Arguments for slavery reparations have fallen out of favor even as reparations for other forms of racial injustice are taken more seriously. This retreat is unsurprising, as arguments for slavery reparations often rely on two normatively irregular claims: that reparations are owed to the dead (as opposed to, say, their living heirs), and that the present generation inherits an as yet unrequited guilt from past generations. Outside of some strands of Black thought and activism on slavery reparations, these claims are (...)
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  5.  1
    Reflexive Biopolitics and the Structure of Experimental Knowledge.Justas Patkauskas - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):755-781.
    Over the last 20 years, biopolitics has become an established research field within the humanities and the social sciences. However, scholars agree that the academic status of biopolitics remains problematic due to the latter’s conceptual fuzziness, unmanageable scope and weak foundations. To address these issues, biopolitics theorists have engaged in reflexive efforts to convert biopolitics into a respectable discipline with a clear definition, research agenda and canon. In this article, I examine the reflexive biopolitics scholarship that has emerged in the (...)
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  6. Reflexive Biopolitics and the Structure of Experimental Knowledge.Justas Patkauskas - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):755-781.
    Over the last 20 years, biopolitics has become an established research field within the humanities and the social sciences. However, scholars agree that the academic status of biopolitics remains problematic due to the latter’s conceptual fuzziness, unmanageable scope and weak foundations. To address these issues, biopolitics theorists have engaged in reflexive efforts to convert biopolitics into a respectable discipline with a clear definition, research agenda and canon. In this article, I examine the reflexive biopolitics scholarship that has emerged in the (...)
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  7.  2
    ‘Who’ or ‘What’ is the Rule of Law?Steven L. Winter - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):655-673.
    The standard account of the relation between democracy and the rule of law focuses on law’s liberty-enhancing role in constraining official action. This is a faint echo of the complex, constitutive relation between the two. The Greeks used one word – isonomia – to describe both. If democracy is the system in which people have an equal say in determining the rules that govern social life, then the rule of law is simultaneously before, after, concurrent and synonymous with democracy: It (...)
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  8.  1
    ‘Who’ or ‘What’ is the Rule of Law?Steven L. Winter - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):655-673.
    The standard account of the relation between democracy and the rule of law focuses on law’s liberty-enhancing role in constraining official action. This is a faint echo of the complex, constitutive relation between the two. The Greeks used one word – isonomia – to describe both. If democracy is the system in which people have an equal say in determining the rules that govern social life, then the rule of law is simultaneously before, after, concurrent and synonymous with democracy: It (...)
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  9.  2
    ‘Who’ or ‘What’ is the Rule of Law?Steven L. Winter - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):655-673.
    The standard account of the relation between democracy and the rule of law focuses on law’s liberty-enhancing role in constraining official action. This is a faint echo of the complex, constitutive relation between the two. The Greeks used one word – isonomia – to describe both. If democracy is the system in which people have an equal say in determining the rules that govern social life, then the rule of law is simultaneously before, after, concurrent and synonymous with democracy: It (...)
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  10.  2
    Caricaturing the Prophet: Pushing the Right to Free Speech Too Far?Masooda Bano - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):544-555.
    Despite growing evidence that production of cartoons and caricatures of Muhammad causes deep hurt to Muslims across the world, European leaders are refusing to restrict their publication in the name of free speech. This article questions this position on three counts: one, the hurt these cartoons cause to the Muslims and the resulting frictions between Europe and leaders of the Muslim countries; two, the harm they cause to European societies by increasing the tension between Muslims and ordinary citizens and the (...)
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  11.  16
    Freedom of Speech: A Relational Defence.Matteo Bonotti & Jonathan Seglow - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):515-529.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 515-529, May 2022. Much of the recent literature on freedom of speech has focused on the arguments for and against the regulation of certain kinds of speech. Discussions of hate speech and offensive speech, for example, abound in this literature, as do debates concerning the permissibility of pornography. Less attention has been paid, however, at least recently, to the normative foundations of freedom of speech where three classic justifications still prevail, based (...)
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  12.  1
    Confucian Free Expression and the Threat of Disinformation.David Elstein - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):568-579.
    At present, there is a wide divergence in attitudes toward free speech in countries strongly influenced by Confucianism. Japan, Korea, and Taiwan have fairly robust rights of free expression. Mainland China does not, strongly restricting speech that the government judges threatens State interests. I argue that although traditional Confucian scholars supported many restrictions on expression, Confucian philosophers actually have good reason to want to protect expression about values. Subsequently, I consider how to address the problem of disinformation while preserving this (...)
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  13.  2
    Cartoons Go Global: Provocation, Condemnation and the Possibility of Laughter.Daniel Gamper - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):530-543.
    Since their publication, the Muhammad cartoons featured in Jyllands Posten and Charlie Hebdo have become a symbol of free speech and Western values. These cartoons used provocation as a tool to discuss the limits of free speech and the scope of social self-censorship. In a just society, should the possibility of laughter be distributed equally? Should cartoonists and editors only publish jokes that are universally laughable? What is the proper reaction to these kinds of provocative jokes once the possibility of (...)
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  14.  3
    Freedom of Speech in Contemporary Arab Societies From a Gender Perspective.Amel Grami - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):580-589.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 580-589, May 2022. Women and girls in contemporary Arab societies suffer from various and intersecting forms of discrimination that deny them their enjoyment of fundamental human rights. The right to freedom of expression is one of the essential areas that may expose this gender-based discrimination and patriarchal attitudes. In many contexts, freedom of expression has enabled women to speak out and organize in civil, political, social, economic and cultural spheres and contexts; (...)
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  15. Freedom of Speech in Contemporary Arab Societies From a Gender Perspective.Amel Grami - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):580-589.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 580-589, May 2022. Women and girls in contemporary Arab societies suffer from various and intersecting forms of discrimination that deny them their enjoyment of fundamental human rights. The right to freedom of expression is one of the essential areas that may expose this gender-based discrimination and patriarchal attitudes. In many contexts, freedom of expression has enabled women to speak out and organize in civil, political, social, economic and cultural spheres and contexts; (...)
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  16. Academic Freedom: How to Conceptualize and Justify It?Devrim Kabasakal Badamchi - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):619-630.
    This article deals with the question of how academic freedom can be conceptualized and justified. First, I analyze two conceptions of academic freedom: institutional autonomy and intellectual and professional autonomy. I claim that institutional autonomy is a limited way to conceptualize academic freedom because there is no guarantee that institutions always favor freedom of intellectuals. In line with this, I argue that academic freedom as intellectual and professional autonomy should be the prior, if not the only, conception of academic freedom. (...)
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  17.  5
    Freedom of Speech in Liberal and Non-Liberal Traditions.Volker Kaul - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):460-472.
    The article presents different theories and comparative analyses of freedom of speech in both liberal and non-liberal traditions. Whereas freedom of speech is not an absolute right, the question is if this right should depend wholly on the truth of the respective opinion or statement. Theories that justify free speech on the grounds of autonomy, tend to make truth a moral requirement of speech. Theories based on civility and public reason do restrict freedom of speech even further, often making a (...)
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  18.  2
    Freedom of Expression as Self-Restraint.Matthew H. Kramer - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):473-483.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 473-483, May 2022. In my recent book Freedom of Expression as Self-Restraint, I expound and defend the moral principle of freedom of expression. This article recounts a few of the main strands of the exposition in that book, and it touches upon the justification for the principle of freedom of expression. Supplementing the abstract ideas broached in the article are several illustrative examples that render the abstractions more accessible.
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  19.  2
    Lost in the Marketplace of Ideas: Towards a New Constitution for Free Speech After Trump and Twitter?Stephen Macedo - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):496-514.
    Democracy is in crisis and one core feature is a communications crisis: a failure of institutions to reliably generate and curate the circulation of information and communications. Capitalism, the internet and Covid have all been unkind to journalism: newspapers and their reporters have been decimated. Newer media – such as Facebook, Twitter and Google – have amassed enormous power in a remarkably short time. They are the new gatekeepers of free expression, as witnessed by the Twitter ban of Donald Trump. (...)
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  20.  1
    Lost in the Marketplace of Ideas: Towards a New Constitution for Free Speech After Trump and Twitter?Stephen Macedo - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):496-514.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 496-514, May 2022. Democracy is in crisis and one core feature is a communications crisis: a failure of institutions to reliably generate and curate the circulation of information and communications. Capitalism, the internet and Covid have all been unkind to journalism: newspapers and their reporters have been decimated. Newer media – such as Facebook, Twitter and Google – have amassed enormous power in a remarkably short time. They are the new gatekeepers (...)
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  21.  4
    Lost in the Marketplace of Ideas: Towards a New Constitution for Free Speech After Trump and Twitter?Stephen Macedo - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):496-514.
    Democracy is in crisis and one core feature is a communications crisis: a failure of institutions to reliably generate and curate the circulation of information and communications. Capitalism, the internet and Covid have all been unkind to journalism: newspapers and their reporters have been decimated. Newer media – such as Facebook, Twitter and Google – have amassed enormous power in a remarkably short time. They are the new gatekeepers of free expression, as witnessed by the Twitter ban of Donald Trump. (...)
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  22. Gendering Islamophobia at the Crossroad of Conflicting Rights.Debora Spini - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):556-567.
    The presence of Muslims in the European public spheres has raised a hoist of debates concerning issues of neutrality, tolerance, and secularism. All over Europe, Muslims are the target of specific forms of hostility, a phenomenon rising substantial questions about the real inclusivity of European democratic spaces. The category of ‘Islamophobia’ has emerged as a valid heuristic tool to identify specific processes of racialization of religion. However, its validity has been fiercely questioned, and the use of this term has been (...)
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  23. Gendering Islamophobia at the Crossroad of Conflicting Rights.Debora Spini - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):556-567.
    The presence of Muslims in the European public spheres has raised a hoist of debates concerning issues of neutrality, tolerance, and secularism. All over Europe, Muslims are the target of specific forms of hostility, a phenomenon rising substantial questions about the real inclusivity of European democratic spaces. The category of ‘Islamophobia’ has emerged as a valid heuristic tool to identify specific processes of racialization of religion. However, its validity has been fiercely questioned, and the use of this term has been (...)
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  24.  9
    On the Wrongness of Lies.Cass R. Sunstein - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):484-495.
    Why are lies wrong? The Kantian answer sees lies as a close cousin to coercion; they are a violation of individual autonomy and a demonstration of contempt. By contrast, the utilitarian answer is that lies are likely to lead to terrible consequences, sometimes because they obliterate trust, sometime because they substitute the liar’s will for that of the chooser, who has much better information about the chooser’s welfare than does the liar. The utilitarian objection to paternalistic lies is akin to (...)
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  25.  4
    On the Wrongness of Lies.Cass R. Sunstein - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):484-495.
    Why are lies wrong? The Kantian answer sees lies as a close cousin to coercion; they are a violation of individual autonomy and a demonstration of contempt. By contrast, the utilitarian answer is that lies are likely to lead to terrible consequences, sometimes because they obliterate trust, sometime because they substitute the liar’s will for that of the chooser, who has much better information about the chooser’s welfare than does the liar. The utilitarian objection to paternalistic lies is akin to (...)
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  26.  4
    On the Wrongness of Lies.Cass R. Sunstein - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):484-495.
    Why are lies wrong? The Kantian answer sees lies as a close cousin to coercion; they are a violation of individual autonomy and a demonstration of contempt. By contrast, the utilitarian answer is that lies are likely to lead to terrible consequences, sometimes because they obliterate trust, sometime because they substitute the liar’s will for that of the chooser, who has much better information about the chooser’s welfare than does the liar. The utilitarian objection to paternalistic lies is akin to (...)
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  27.  2
    Banishing the Poets: Reflections on Free Speech and Literary Censorship in Vietnam.Richard Quang-Anh Tran - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):603-618.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 603-618, May 2022. The article examines the status of free speech in Vietnam in light of some of the explosive debates that have flared up in both the US and Europe. It argues that unlike in the West the Vietnamese case requires a critical defense to augment the space for free speech as such. To lead up to this conclusion, the essay looks at two case studies of literary censorship in Vietnam (...)
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  28.  1
    Banishing the Poets: Reflections on Free Speech and Literary Censorship in Vietnam.Richard Quang-Anh Tran - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):603-618.
    The article examines the status of free speech in Vietnam in light of some of the explosive debates that have flared up in both the US and Europe. It argues that unlike in the West the Vietnamese case requires a critical defense to augment the space for free speech as such. To lead up to this conclusion, the essay looks at two case studies of literary censorship in Vietnam to demonstrate that, since the middle of the twentieth-century, literary speech has (...)
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  29.  2
    Faking News, Hiding Data: New Assaults on Freedom of Speech in India.Ananya Vajpeyi - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):590-602.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 590-602, May 2022.
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  30.  1
    Faking News, Hiding Data: New Assaults on Freedom of Speech in India.Ananya Vajpeyi - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):590-602.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print.
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  31.  3
    Threats to Academic Freedom: The French Case.Michel Wieviorka - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):631-641.
    Academic freedom is currently threatened not only in dictatorial or authoritarian regimes but in democracies as well. Thus, this analysis of the contemporary French experience, in which we observe a destructive climate maintained by intellectuals and political actors on both the right and the left. The extremization, intolerance, and radicalization of debates have increased since the election of Emmanuel Macron in 2017. At the same time, university institutions often appear overwhelmed or powerless in the face of both internal and external (...)
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  32.  1
    Threats to Academic Freedom: The French Case.Michel Wieviorka - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):631-641.
    Academic freedom is currently threatened not only in dictatorial or authoritarian regimes but in democracies as well. Thus, this analysis of the contemporary French experience, in which we observe a destructive climate maintained by intellectuals and political actors on both the right and the left. The extremization, intolerance, and radicalization of debates have increased since the election of Emmanuel Macron in 2017. At the same time, university institutions often appear overwhelmed or powerless in the face of both internal and external (...)
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  33. Differentiating Risks to Academic Freedom in the Globalised University in China.Sophia Woodman & Tim Pringle - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):642-651.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 642-651, May 2022. Academic freedom in China is unquestionably under threat from various quarters. Yet the assumption that only the logics of authoritarian Communist Party power shape the terrain in which scholars operate provides us with a limited perspective on these threats. The Chinese academy has become deeply entangled with transnational forces, and is increasingly driven by similar business logics to those in play in universities around the world. We argue that (...)
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  34. Differentiating Risks to Academic Freedom in the Globalised University in China.Sophia Woodman & Tim Pringle - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):642-651.
    Academic freedom in China is unquestionably under threat from various quarters. Yet the assumption that only the logics of authoritarian Communist Party power shape the terrain in which scholars operate provides us with a limited perspective on these threats. The Chinese academy has become deeply entangled with transnational forces, and is increasingly driven by similar business logics to those in play in universities around the world. We argue that these forces too contribute to the context for the exercise of academic (...)
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  35.  38
    The Concept of Publicness in Kant’s Critical Method of Metaphysics.Farshid Baghai - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):333-360.
    Kant’s writings on political philosophy do not clearly and conclusively determine its place and significance in his critical philosophy. To address this issue, most accounts of Kant’s political philosophy concentrate on his explicitly political texts that cluster around the second and third Critiques. Although many of these interpretations illuminate different aspects of Kant’s political philosophy, they are silent with regard to a concept of publicness that is implied in the first Critique. This article suggests that Kant’s critical method of metaphysics (...)
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  36.  5
    What the Controversy Over ‘the Reasonable’ Reveals: On Habermas’s Auch Eine Geschichte der Philosophie.Alessandro Ferrara - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):313-332.
    This article discusses Jürgen Habermas’s latest book Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophie from the specific angle of what the section on Rawls indicates about the overall philosophical project pursued by Habermas. This tiny element within the imposing architecture reveals a structural problem that affects Habermas’s program for a detranscendentalization of reason. After a general premise, Habermas’s appraisal of Rawls’s work is reconstructed and critically examined. Then, in the guise of a Rawlsian rejoinder, a problematic understanding of pluralism is shown to (...)
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  37.  4
    What the Controversy Over ‘the Reasonable’ Reveals: On Habermas’s Auch Eine Geschichte der Philosophie.Alessandro Ferrara - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):313-332.
    This article discusses Jürgen Habermas’s latest book Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophie from the specific angle of what the section on Rawls indicates about the overall philosophical project pursued by Habermas. This tiny element within the imposing architecture reveals a structural problem that affects Habermas’s program for a detranscendentalization of reason. After a general premise, Habermas’s appraisal of Rawls’s work is reconstructed and critically examined. Then, in the guise of a Rawlsian rejoinder, a problematic understanding of pluralism is shown to (...)
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  38.  5
    What the Controversy Over ‘the Reasonable’ Reveals: On Habermas’s Auch Eine Geschichte der Philosophie.Alessandro Ferrara - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):313-332.
    This article discusses Jürgen Habermas’s latest book Auch eine Geschichte der Philosophie from the specific angle of what the section on Rawls indicates about the overall philosophical project pursued by Habermas. This tiny element within the imposing architecture reveals a structural problem that affects Habermas’s program for a detranscendentalization of reason. After a general premise, Habermas’s appraisal of Rawls’s work is reconstructed and critically examined. Then, in the guise of a Rawlsian rejoinder, a problematic understanding of pluralism is shown to (...)
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  39.  8
    Beyond the Political Principle: Applying Martin Buber’s Philosophy to Societal Polarization.Marc Pauly - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):437-456.
    Societal polarization has given rise to opposing groups that fight each other as enemies and that have very different ideas about what should be done and about what is the case. This article investigates what tools there are in the philosophy of Martin Buber to address this societal polarization. Buber’s notion of community, the relationship between means and ends, his opposition to the political principle, the notion of an I-Thou dialogue and his conception of truth are presented as relevant for (...)
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  40.  11
    The Virtues of Truth: On Democracy’s Epistemic Value.Zhichao Tong - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):416-436.
    Drawing on Bernard Williams's Truth and Truthfulness and Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Justice, this article presents an epistemic argument for democracy on the basis of its ability to incentivize more people to display the virtues of truth required for the social production and aggregation of knowledge. In particular, the article compares democracy respectively with autocracy and epistocracy, showing that it is likely to be, within the context of a modern pluralistic society, an epistemically superior regime in the sense that it creates (...)
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  41.  12
    The Virtues of Truth: On Democracy’s Epistemic Value.Zhichao Tong - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):416-436.
    Drawing on Bernard Williams's Truth and Truthfulness and Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Justice, this article presents an epistemic argument for democracy on the basis of its ability to incentivize more people to display the virtues of truth required for the social production and aggregation of knowledge. In particular, the article compares democracy respectively with autocracy and epistocracy, showing that it is likely to be, within the context of a modern pluralistic society, an epistemically superior regime in the sense that it creates (...)
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  42.  6
    The Virtues of Truth: On Democracy’s Epistemic Value.Zhichao Tong - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):416-436.
    Drawing on Bernard Williams's Truth and Truthfulness and Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Justice, this article presents an epistemic argument for democracy on the basis of its ability to incentivize more people to display the virtues of truth required for the social production and aggregation of knowledge. In particular, the article compares democracy respectively with autocracy and epistocracy, showing that it is likely to be, within the context of a modern pluralistic society, an epistemically superior regime in the sense that it creates (...)
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  43.  4
    Who, the People? Rethinking Constituent Power as Praxis.Maxim van Asseldonk - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):361-385.
    Modern thinking about democracy is largely governed by the concept of constituent power. Some versions of the concept of constituent power, however, remain haunted by the spectre of totalitarianism. In this article, I outline an alternative view of the identity of the people whose constituent power generates democratic authority. Broadly speaking, constituent power signifies the idea that all political authority, including that of the constitution, must find its source in some idea of ‘the people’, whose authority is never exhausted by (...)
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  44.  4
    Who, the People? Rethinking Constituent Power as Praxis.Maxim van Asseldonk - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):361-385.
    Modern thinking about democracy is largely governed by the concept of constituent power. Some versions of the concept of constituent power, however, remain haunted by the spectre of totalitarianism. In this article, I outline an alternative view of the identity of the people whose constituent power generates democratic authority. Broadly speaking, constituent power signifies the idea that all political authority, including that of the constitution, must find its source in some idea of ‘the people’, whose authority is never exhausted by (...)
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  45.  3
    Who, the People? Rethinking Constituent Power as Praxis.Maxim van Asseldonk - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (3):361-385.
    Modern thinking about democracy is largely governed by the concept of constituent power. Some versions of the concept of constituent power, however, remain haunted by the spectre of totalitarianism. In this article, I outline an alternative view of the identity of the people whose constituent power generates democratic authority. Broadly speaking, constituent power signifies the idea that all political authority, including that of the constitution, must find its source in some idea of ‘the people’, whose authority is never exhausted by (...)
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  46.  3
    Of Savages and Stoics: Converging Moral and Political Ideals in the Conjectural Histories of Rousseau and Ferguson.Rudmer Bijlsma - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):209-244.
    This article undertakes a comparative study of the conjectural histories of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Ferguson, focusing on the convergences in the moral and political ideals expressed and grounded in these histories. In comparison with Scots like Adam Smith and John Millar, the conjectural histories of Ferguson and Rousseau follow a similar historical trajectory as regards the development and progress of commercial, political and cultural arts. However, their assessment of the moral progress of humanity does not, or in a much (...)
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  47. Of Savages and Stoics: Converging Moral and Political Ideals in the Conjectural Histories of Rousseau and Ferguson.Rudmer Bijlsma - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):209-244.
    This article undertakes a comparative study of the conjectural histories of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Ferguson, focusing on the convergences in the moral and political ideals expressed and grounded in these histories. In comparison with Scots like Adam Smith and John Millar, the conjectural histories of Ferguson and Rousseau follow a similar historical trajectory as regards the development and progress of commercial, political and cultural arts. However, their assessment of the moral progress of humanity does not, or in a much (...)
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  48.  5
    Of Savages and Stoics: Converging Moral and Political Ideals in the Conjectural Histories of Rousseau and Ferguson.Rudmer Bijlsma - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):209-244.
    This article undertakes a comparative study of the conjectural histories of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Ferguson, focusing on the convergences in the moral and political ideals expressed and grounded in these histories. In comparison with Scots like Adam Smith and John Millar, the conjectural histories of Ferguson and Rousseau follow a similar historical trajectory as regards the development and progress of commercial, political and cultural arts. However, their assessment of the moral progress of humanity does not, or in a much (...)
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  49.  3
    The Horizon of Another World: Foucault’s Cynics and the Birth of Radical Cosmopolitics.Tamara Caraus - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):245-267.
    The ancient Cynic Diogenes was the first to declare ‘I am a citizen of the world ’ and the other Cynics followed him. In The Courage of the Truth, Michel Foucault analyses the Cynic mode of parrhēsia and living in truth, however, his text expands the cosmopolitical amplitude of Cynics since the Cynics’ true life contains an inherent cosmopolitan logic. Identifying the core of the Cynic true life in the care for the self that leads to the care for the (...)
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  50.  1
    Criticizing Critique. A Discussion of Asger Sørensen’s Capitalism, Alienation and Critique.Carsten Friberg - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):153-154.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 153-154, February 2022.
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  51.  7
    From Horkheimer to Honneth and Back Again: A Comment on Asger Sørensen’s Capitalism, Alienation and Critique.Malte Frøslee Ibsen - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):155-163.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 155-163, February 2022. This article comments on Asger Sørensen’s stimulating book “Capitalism, Alienation and Critique”. The article argues that Sørensen overlooks an important methodological contiunuity between Max Horkheimer’s and Axel Honneth’s work: namely, the model of immanent critique, to which both remain committed. Moreover, through a critical discussion of Honneth’s method of normative reconstruction, the article argues that globalized capitalism represents a serious methodological challenge not only to Honneth’s work, but to (...)
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    Critical Theory and the Future of Humanity: A Reply to Asger Sørensen.Per Jepsen - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):164-173.
    The article entails a critical discussion of the book Capitalism, Alienation and Critique by Asger Sørensen. Like Sørensen’s book, it stresses the importance of the first generation of critical theory – especially Horkheimer and Adorno – although Sørensen is at the same time critized for neglecting the insights of Horkheimer and Adornos work from the mid-1940s and onwards. In arguing for the actuality of especially the late Horkheimer, the article emphasizes the following topics: The problems of education and ‘Bildung’, The (...)
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  53.  2
    Critical Theory and the Future of Humanity: A Reply to Asger Sørensen.Per Jepsen - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):164-173.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 164-173, February 2022. The article entails a critical discussion of the book Capitalism, Alienation and Critique by Asger Sørensen. Like Sørensen’s book, it stresses the importance of the first generation of critical theory – especially Horkheimer and Adorno – although Sørensen is at the same time critized for neglecting the insights of Horkheimer and Adornos work from the mid-1940s and onwards. In arguing for the actuality of especially the late Horkheimer, the (...)
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  54.  5
    Neoliberalism, the Entrepreneur and Critique of Political Economy: A Commentary on Sørensen’s Capitalism, Alienation and Critique.Luise Li Langergaard - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):174-183.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 174-183, February 2022. This article is a commentary on Asger Sørensen's book Capitalism, Alienation and Critique, especially his definition and delimitation of neoliberalism. Overall, I sympathize with Sørensen's aim and critical project and also acknowledge the contribution of his particular approach to a critique of capitalism, political economy and more specifically neoliberalism. However, I shall discuss whether his definition of neoliberalism is the most appropriate from a critical perspective, i.e. as a (...)
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  55.  6
    Radical Democratic Theory and Migration: The Refugee Protest March as a Democratic Practice.Helge Schwiertz - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):289-309.
    In dominant discourses, migrants are mostly perceived as either victims or villains but rarely as political subjects and democratic constituents. Challenging this view, the aim of the article is to rethink democracy with respect to migration struggles. I argue that movements of migration are not only consistent with democracy but also provide a decisive impetus for actualizing democratic principles in the context of debates about the crisis of representation and post-democracy. Drawing on the work of Jacques Rancière, Étienne Balibar and (...)
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  56.  1
    Critical Theory, Immanent Critique and Neo-Liberalism. Reply to Critique Raised in Copenhagen.Asger Sørensen - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (2):184-208.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 184-208, February 2022. Being critical does not come easy, not even within Critical Theory. In this article I respond to criticism of my book from 2019, Capitalism, Alienation and Critique, arguing that contemporary Critical Theory has something to learn from the founding fathers. Firstly, for Adorno immanent critique has metaphysical implications beyond Honneth’s critique of bourgeois society as inconsistent in terms of its professed ideals. Secondly, immanent critique is not the same (...)
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  57.  2
    Three Forms of Philosophical Theatre in Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks.Stuart Dalton - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (1):86-127.
    I argue that Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks deserve to be read as works of philosophy and not just used as supplements to bring order and respectability to Kierkegaard’s other writings. There are at least three specific philosophical values in Kierkegaard’s journals – three ways in which the journals create philosophy within their own pages and therefore deserve to be read as independent works of philosophy and not just as supplements to Kierkegaard’s other writing: The journals demonstrate what a true work (...)
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    Good Life Egalitarianism.Tom Malleson - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (1):14-39.
    This article carves out a new path between the two dominant wings of contemporary egalitarianism. The luck egalitarian emphasis on choice and personal responsibility is misplaced because individuals differ so deeply, and arbitrarily, in their choice-making capacities. Allowing inequalities to result from ‘choice’ is akin to allowing inequalities to stem from the possession of any other morally arbitrary factor – such as skin colour or gender. The move towards relational egalitarianism has been a case of two-steps forward, one-step back. While (...)
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  59.  3
    Connecting Racial and Species Justice: Towards an Afrocentric Animal Advocacy.Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Some philosophers and activists have been sceptical about the relevance of pursuing animal justice to progress racial justice. Routinely, these sceptics have argued that allying animal and racial j...
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