Year:

  1. Comparing the Laws of Privacy.Marc Jonathan Blitz - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):265-277.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Punitive Restoration and Restorative Justice.Brooks Thom - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):122-140.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Punitive Restoration and Restorative Justice.Brooks Thom - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):122-140.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Punitive Restoration and Restorative Justice.Brooks Thom - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):122-140.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Moral Responsibility and Intentional Action: Sehon on Freedom and Purpose.Corrado Michael Louis - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):246-264.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Moral Responsibility and Intentional Action: Sehon on Freedom and Purpose.Corrado Michael Louis - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):246-264.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Moral Responsibility and Intentional Action: Sehon on Freedom and Purpose.Corrado Michael Louis - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):246-264.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Why Would Two-Level Consequentialists Punish Only the Guilty?Goodman Charles - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):183-204.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Why Would Two-Level Consequentialists Punish Only the Guilty?Goodman Charles - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):183-204.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Why Would Two-Level Consequentialists Punish Only the Guilty?Goodman Charles - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):183-204.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Forfeiture Theory and Symmetrical Attackers.Stephen Kershnar - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):224-245.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  14
    Contractualism and the Death Penalty.Li Hon Lam - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):152-182.
    It is a truism that there are erroneous convictions in criminal trials. Recent legal findings show that 3.3% to 5%of all convictions in capital rape-murder cases in the U.S. in the 1980s were erroneous convictions. Given this fact, what normative conclusions can be drawn? First, the article argues that a moderately revised version of Scanlon’ s contractualism offers an attractive moral vision that is different from utilitarianism or other consequentialist theories, or from purely deontological theories. It then brings this version (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Contractualism and the Death Penalty.Li Hon-Lam - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):152-182.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  7
    Should Law Track Morality?Re'em Segev - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):205-223.
    Does the moral status of an action provide in itself a non-instrumental, pro-tanto reason for a corresponding legal status – a reason that applies regardless of whether the law promotes a value that is independent of the law, such as preventing wrongdoing or promoting distributive or retributive justice? While the relation between morality and law is a familiar topic, this specific question is typically not considered explicitly. Yet it seems to be controversial and each of the contrasting answers to this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Mill’s Defense of Capital Punishment.C. L. Ten - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):141-151.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Considering Murphy on Human Executioners.Christopher Bennett - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):111-116.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Considering Murphy on Human Executioners.Christopher Bennett - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):111-116.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Punishment, Liberalism, and Public Reason.Chad Flanders - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):61-77.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Punishment, Liberalism, and Public Reason.Chad Flanders - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):61-77.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Mitigation Evidence and the Ethical Role of a Defense Attorney in a Capital Case.Lisa Bell Holleran - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):97-110.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Mitigation Evidence and the Ethical Role of a Defense Attorney in a Capital Case.Lisa Bell Holleran - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):97-110.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  14
    Taking Deterrence Seriously-- The Wide-Scope Theory Deterrence Theory of Punishment.Hsin-wen Lee - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):2-24.
    A deterrence theory of punishment holds that the institution of criminal punishment is morally justified because it serves to deter crime. Because the fear of external sanction is an important incentive in crime deterrence, the deterrence theory is often associated with the idea of severe, disproportionate punishment. An objection to this theory holds that hope of escape renders even the severest punishment inapt and irrelevant. -/- This article revisits the concept of deterrence and defend a more plausible deterrence theory of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Civics, Policy, and Demoralization.Jonathan Jacobs - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):25-44.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Civics, Policy, and Demoralization.Jonathan Jacobs - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):25-44.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Reply to Bennett.Jeffrie G. Murphy - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):117-119.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Reply to Bennett.Jeffrie G. Murphy - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):117-119.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  4
    Punishment and Autonomous Shame in Confucian Thought.Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):45-60.
    As recorded in the Analects, Kongzi (Confucius) held that using punishment to influence ordinary citizens will do little to develop a sense of shame (chi 恥) in them. This term is usually taken to refer to a sense of shame described here as “ autonomous,” understood as a predisposition to feel ashamed when one does something wrong because it seems wrong to oneself, and not because others regard it as wrong or shameful. Historically, Confucian philosophers have thought a great deal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Dr. Death? Professionalism, Virtue, and U.S. Physician Participation in the Death Penalty.L. Walker Rebecca - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):78-96.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Dr. Death? Professionalism, Virtue, and U.S. Physician Participation in the Death Penalty.L. Walker Rebecca - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (1):78-96.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues