Year:

  1.  4
    Can We Learn to Hear Ethical Calls? In Honor of Scott Cameron.Christina M. Gschwandtner - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):21-42.
    This article tries to grapple with the difficulty of hearing the call of the other and recognizing it as a call that obligates us to ethical response, especially when such a “call” is not issued by a human other but by other species or environmental precarity more broadly. I briefly review how ethical responsibility is articulated by Emmanuel Lévinas and then consider some of the ways in which his philosophy has been applied to environmental questions. I suggest that while some (...)
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  2.  3
    Eric T. Freyfogle. A Good That Transcends: How US Culture Undermines Environmental Reform.Abigail Klassen - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):117-120.
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  3.  3
    Wayne Gabardi. The Next Social Contract: Animals, the Anthropocene, and Biopolitics.Dan Liu - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):121-124.
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  4.  2
    Urban Mobility—Urban Discovery.Jonathan Maskit - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):43-58.
    In this paper I investigate how different modes of urban transportation shape our experience of the urban environment. My goal is to argue that how we move through a space is not merely a question of convenience or efficiency. Rather, our transportation technologies can fundamentally shift how we experience where we are. I propose a framework for considering mobility from the standpoint of phenomenological everyday aesthetics considering the social, somatic, temporal-epistemic, and affective characteristics of experience. I then suggest a typology (...)
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  5.  4
    In Defense of the Human Difference.Sean J. McGrath - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):101-115.
    Against the prevalent trend in eco-criticism which is to deny the human difference, I summon a set of untimely tropes from metaphysics in the interest of advancing an ecological humanism: the difference in kind between human consciousness and animal sensibility; the uniquely human capacity for moral discernment; and the human being’s peculiar freedom from the material conditions of existence. While I agree with eco-critics who argue that anthropocenic nature is not only finite, but sick: sickened by our abuse and neglect, (...)
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  6.  5
    Gerard Kuperus. Ecopolitical Homelessness: Defining Place in an Unsettled World.Sam Mickey - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):125-128.
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  7.  2
    Blue Architectures.Brook Muller - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):59-75.
    It is more than a coincidence that in his two essays, “Wilderness and the City: Not such a Long Drive After All” and “Can Cities Be Both Natural and Successful? Reflections Grounding Two Apparently Oxymoronic Aspirations,” Scott Cameron looks to water as a basis for evaluating the city in relationship to the wild and in imagining new possibilities for urban nature. In an attempt to complement and enrich Cameron’s thinking, this essay focuses on emerging, decentralized and ecologically responsive approaches to (...)
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  8.  5
    Clive Hamilton. Defiant Earth: The Fate of Humans in the Anthropocene.Sarah-Louise Ruder - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):129-134.
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  9.  1
    Editor's Introduction.Brian Treanor - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):1-6.
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  10.  4
    Is Nature Natural? And Other Linguistic Conundrums.David Utsler - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):77-89.
    One of Scott Cameron’s most recent contributions to environmental hermeneutics was to defend the concept of nature against those who would argue that it should be abandoned in order to stave off the ecological destruction. Rather than jettison nature as an outdated and unhelpful construct, Cameron argued for its redemption based on Gadamer’s hermeneutical insights into language. In this article, I will look at Cameron’s arguments against Steven Vogel as well as particular points made against nature as a concept recently (...)
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  11.  4
    Doing Without Nature.Steven Vogel - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):91-100.
    Sorry that he is no longer here to read it, I consider in this paper Scott Cameron’s discussion of my views questioning the value of the concept of “nature” for environmental philosophy. Scott had suggested, based on arguments from hermeneutics, that although we never have access to a nature independent of our interpretations of it, still the existence of such a nature is necessarily presupposed by all such interpretations. I claim in response that if we replace the notion of interpretation (...)
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  12.  4
    Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore. A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet.Clint Wilson - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):135-138.
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