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  1.  3
    Military Space Ethics, edited by Nikki Coleman.Darren Cronshaw - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):85-86.
    I was born in the middle of the manned Apollo moon missions and still remember where I was as a teenager viewing Space Shuttle Challenger exploding. I also grew up with interstellar war crimes on t...
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  2.  4
    Autonomous Systems and Moral De-Skilling: Beyond Good and Evil in the Emergent Battlespaces of the Twenty-First Century.Manabrata Guha & Jai Galliott - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):51-71.
    This article investigates the question concerning moral deskilling in the context of autonomous weapon systems. To this end, it interrogates the appropriateness of deskilling as an analytical tool, the consequences of the conflation of the terms “the warrior” and “the soldier,” and the impact of the dominant, but commonplace, understanding of autonomous weapons that underwrites the concerns that have been expressed thus far. While affirming the critical importance of the question regarding moral deskilling in the context of advanced weapons and (...)
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  3.  3
    Psychological Defense Mechanisms of Military Service Members as a Personality Stabilization Regulatory System for Combat Mission Effectiveness.Kateryna Kravchenko, Oleg Khairulin, Serhii Danchevskyi, Stanislav Pavlushenko & Larysa Chernobai - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):72-84.
    This study's objective is to explore the psychological defense mechanisms of Ukrainian service members as a regulatory system for personality stabilization that influences combat mission effectiveness. The study was carried out during 2019–2020. The respondents were 270 military personnel of the ground forces, who had gained experience in the Anti-Terrorist Operation hostilities in the East of Ukraine in 2017–2020. We used psychodiagnostic methods such as the Lifestyle Index by Plutchik, Kellerman, and Conte; Lazarus’s Coping Test; and Leontiev’s Meaningful Life Orientations (...)
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  4.  77
    Proud Vermin: Modern Militias and the State.Colin J. Lewis & Jennifer Kling - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):1-18.
    Contemporary arguments about private paramilitary organizations often focus on the threat of physical violence that they pose to the state: if such organizations garner enough physical power, then they can overtake the state via violent coup. Inspired by the legalist scholar Han Feizi’s position, we contend that such organizations also represent a sociopolitical, existential threat to the state. Specifically, their tendency for ideological expansion and subsequent gathering of political influence undermines state institutions, even without the use of overt physical force. (...)
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  5.  3
    Meaningful Human Control.Henrik Syse - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):1-1.
    When the First World War broke out in August 1914, most believed that it would rapidly be over – hopefully even by Christmas. It lasted for more than four years, with untold destruction and sufferi...
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  6.  7
    Autonomous AI Systems in Conflict: Emergent Behavior and Its Impact on Predictability and Reliability.Daniel Trusilo - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):2-17.
    1. In 1960 Norbert Wiener, the founder of the field of cybernetics, wrote, “It is my thesis that machines can and do transcend some of the limitations of their designers, and that in doing so they...
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  7.  8
    Autonomous Weapon Systems: A Clarification.Nathan Gabriel Wood - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 22 (1):18-32.
    Due to advances in military technology, there has been an outpouring of research on what are known as autonomous weapon systems (AWS). However, it is common in this literature for arguments to be made without first making clear exactly what definitions one is employing, with the detrimental effect that authors may speak past one another or even miss the targets of their arguments. In this article I examine the U.S. Department of Defense and International Committee of the Red Cross definitions (...)
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  8.  7
    Jus in bello Necessity, The Requirement of Minimal Force, and Autonomous Weapons Systems.Alexander Blanchard & Mariarosaria Taddeo - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 21 (3):286-303.
    In this article we focus on the jus in bello principle of necessity for guiding the use of autonomous weapons systems (AWS). We begin our analysis with an account of the principle of necessity as entailing the requirement of minimal force found in Just War Theory, before highlighting the absence of this principle in existing work on AWS. Overlooking this principle means discounting the obligations that combatants have towards one another in times of war. We argue that the requirement of (...)
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  9.  19
    The AI Commander Problem: Ethical, Political, and Psychological Dilemmas of Human-Machine Interactions in AI-enabled Warfare.James Johnson - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 21 (3):246-271.
    Can AI solve the ethical, moral, and political dilemmas of warfare? How is artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled warfare changing the way we think about the ethical-political dilemmas and practice of war? This article explores the key elements of the ethical, moral, and political dilemmas of human-machine interactions in modern digitized warfare. It provides a counterpoint to the argument that AI “rational” efficiency can simultaneously offer a viable solution to human psychological and biological fallibility in combat while retaining “meaningful” human control over (...)
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  10.  7
    Just Coups: A Reconsideration of Domestic Military Action.E. Stefan Kehlenbach - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 21 (3):320-336.
    Are there situations where military coups can be considered justified, such as the overthrow of a collapsing, genocidal dictatorship? I argue that under certain circumstances there is an opening for “just coups.” I propose a theoretical assessment of coups based on an adaptation of just war theory. I bring the comparative literature surrounding civil–military relations into conversation with the literature on just war theory in order to develop a theory of just coups. By adapting the categories of just war theory (...)
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  11.  6
    The Organisational Psychology of Ethical Military Leadership during Times of Crisis: Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic.Mohamed Metwally & Pablo Ruiz-Palomino - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics 21 (3):337-346.
    This article sheds light on the positive impact of ethical leaders on their subordinates’ behaviours during times of crisis. The article focuses on the turbulent and abrupt changes taking place in...
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  12. The Soldier’s Share: Considering Narrow Responsibility for Lethal Autonomous Weapons.Kevin Schieman - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics (3):228-245.
    Robert Sparrow (among others) claims that if an autonomous weapon were to commit a war crime, it would cause harm for which no one could reasonably be blamed. Since no one would bear responsibility for the soldier’s share of killing in such cases, he argues that they would necessarily violate the requirements of jus in bello, and should be prohibited by international law. I argue this view is mistaken and that our moral understanding of war is sufficient to determine blame (...)
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  13.  70
    The Soldier's Share: Considering Narrow Proportionality for Lethal Autonomous Weapons.Kevin Schieman - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics.
    Robert Sparrow (among others) claims that if an autonomous weapon were to commit a war crime, it would cause harm for which no one could reasonably be blamed. Since no one would bear responsibility for the soldier’s share of killing in such cases, he argues that they would necessarily violate the requirements of jus in bello, and should be prohibited by international law. I argue this view is mistaken and that our moral understanding of war is sufficient to determine blame (...)
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