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  1.  4
    Thomas Aquinas on War and Peace, by Gregory M. Reichberg.Reed Bonadonna - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):288-290.
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  2.  8
    A Typology of War Ethics.Davis Brown - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):145-156.
    Interdisciplinary communication on war is impeded by doctrinal gaps concerning its morality, immorality, and amorality. Much is written on ad bellum ethical standards for military force by states, mainly in the fields of international politics and religious studies. However, a necessary first step in comparing these different approaches to war ethics with each other is to develop a system for classifying them. The classification system offered in this paper places war ethics on a grid with two scales. One axis of (...)
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  3.  7
    Military Ethics and the Situationist Critique.Nathan L. Cartagena - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):157-172.
    Many contributors to military ethics from diverse locations and philosophical perspectives maintain that virtues are central to martial theory and practice. Yet several contemporary philosophers and psychologists have recently challenged the empirical adequacy of this perspective. Their challenge is known as the situationist critique, a version of which asserts that: situational features rather than character traits such as virtues cause and explain human behavior, and ethical theories and development programs are empirically inadequate to the extent that they incorporate virtues. In (...)
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  4.  1
    Remotely Piloted Aircraft, Risk, and Killing as Sacrifice: The Cost of Remote Warfare.Joseph O. Chapa - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):256-271.
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  5.  1
    The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Re-Made the World, by Oona A. Hathaway and Scott J. Shapiro.Martin L. Cook - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):286-287.
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  6.  3
    Passing the Torch.Martin L. Cook - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):143-143.
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  7.  3
    Modern Sikh Warriors: Militants, Soldiers, Citizens.Walter Dorn & Stephen Gucciardi - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):272-285.
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  8.  4
    Teaching Professional Ethos.Kjetil Enstad - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):191-204.
    This article investigates the communication of professional ethos, the ethical standards of a profession in training, from passing on ideas of patients’ welfare in medical schools to communicating values in military academies. The article examines this through a consideration of the consequences of Wittgenstein’s discussions on the nature of language: how words and sentences acquire meaning. Wittgenstein’s rule-following paradox, the paradox that any act can be brought into correspondence with a rule and thereby that any “meaning” might be applicable to (...)
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  9.  2
    America’s Prescient Dissenters: Senator J. William Fulbright and Dr. Andrew J. Bacevich’s Principled Dissent of US Policy in Vietnam and Iraq and Their Enduring Perspectives. [REVIEW]Douglas A. Levien Iii - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):173-190.
    ABSTRACTDuring the Cold War, the spread and fear of communism furnished the overarching ideological rationale for American foreign policy and for the deployment of United States military forces and resources. Subscribing to the domino theory and its potential impact on Southeast Asia, the Johnson Administration committed the United States to the Vietnam War. Following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, and the commencement of the Global War on Terrorism, Washington once again set a national agenda rooted in (...)
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  10.  10
    America’s Prescient Dissenters: Senator J. William Fulbright and Dr. Andrew J. Bacevich’s Principled Dissent of US Policy in Vietnam and Iraq and Their Enduring Perspectives. [REVIEW]Douglas A. LeVien - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):173-190.
    During the Cold War, the spread and fear of communism furnished the overarching ideological rationale for American foreign policy and for the deployment of United States military forces and resources. Subscribing to the domino theory and its potential impact on Southeast Asia, the Johnson Administration committed the United States to the Vietnam War. Following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, and the commencement of the Global War on Terrorism, Washington once again set a national agenda rooted in (...)
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  11.  2
    Jacques Maritain: Christian Theorist of Non-Violence and Just War.Gregory M. Reichberg - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):220-238.
    Jacques Maritain is widely recognized as one of the foremost Catholic philosophers of modern times. He wrote groundbreaking works in all branches of philosophy. For a period of about 10 years, beginning in 1933, he discussed matters relating to war and ethics. Writing initially about Gandhi, whose strategy of non-violence he sought to incorporate within a Christian conception of political action, Maritain proceeded to comment more specifically on the religious aspects of armed force in “On Holy War,” an essay about (...)
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  12.  3
    Risk, War, and the Dangers of Soldier Identity.Michael Robillard - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):205-219.
    The profession of arms is distinct from other professions for many reasons. One reason which is not so obvious is that, unlike members of other professions, soldiers may go their entire careers preparing for a day that never arrives. All things considered, we should think this to be a very good thing. For soldiers, however, this can feel somewhat odd, since there is a natural desire to want to feel useful and to see one’s role and purpose find realization. Accordingly, (...)
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  13.  3
    The Importance of Norms.Henrik Syse - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):144-144.
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  14.  3
    Responsibility in Complex Conflicts: An Afghan Case.Cornelia Vikan - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (3-4):239-255.
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  15.  16
    Ethics and Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in the Age of Digital Warfare, by George Lucas.Fritz Allhoff - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):124-127.
    This book review responds to George Lucas's Ethics and Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in an Age of Digital Warfare, laying out the structure of the work as well as highlighting areas of strength.
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  16.  6
    The Asia-Pacific Chapter of the International Society for Military Ethics.Fritz Allhoff, Shannon Ford & Adam Henschke - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):118-120.
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  17.  3
    National Bird, Directed by Sonia Kennebeck.Joseph O. Chapa - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):130-137.
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  18.  3
    The Value of Respect: What Does It Mean for an Army?Pauline Collins - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):2-19.
    The Australian Army has adopted “respect” as a new addition to the existing trio of values, “courage, initiative and teamwork.” This article explores what respect may mean as an army value. The significance of respect surrounding two incidents involving Australian Defence Force personnel while on duty in Afghanistan is considered. The first is the so-called “green on blue” attack by an Afghan National Army soldier killing three Australian soldiers on 29 August 2012. The second concerns allegations of mutilation of suspected (...)
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  19.  3
    We’Ll Always Have Kabul.James L. Cook - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):114-117.
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  20.  4
    Rise of the Machines. A Cybernetic History, by Thomas Rid. [REVIEW]James L. Cook - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):128-129.
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  21.  1
    Senior Officers in the Kishon Diving Affair: Between Ethics and Acts.Tzippi Gushpantz - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):38-55.
    For decades, soldiers in Israel’s elite naval commando unit trained in the highly polluted waters of the Kishon River without conducting any prior examination of its suitability as a training site. Following a high incidence of disease and even death among these soldiers, a national enquiry commission was set up. The thick descriptions in the commission protocols provided the factual infrastructure for this qualitative case study of an organizational phenomenon: how generations of senior officers enabled activities that directly contravened the (...)
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  22.  1
    Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS, Directed by Sebastian Junger and Nick Quested.Claudia Hauer - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):138-141.
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  23.  6
    Towards a Humanitarian Military Ethics: Moral Autonomy, Integrity and Obligations in the British and German Armed Forces.Tomas Kucera - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):20-37.
    Humanitarian operations may pose challenges to which armed forces prepared for warfighting seem rather ill-equipped. It is the aim of this article to examine in what way military ethics should be adapted to humanitarian tasks. Two ideal types of military ethics are defined here: warfighting and humanitarian. The warfighting ethic is supposed to maximise the utility of the military in war and combat and to that end utilises the virtues of loyalty and honour. In contrast, humanitarian obligations require to a (...)
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  24.  64
    Situations and Dispositions: How to Rescue the Military Virtues From Social Psychology.Peter Olsthoorn - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):78-93.
    In recent years, it has been argued more than once that situations determine our conduct to a much greater extent than our character does. This argument rests on the findings of social psychologists such as Stanley Milgram, who have popularized the idea that we can all be brought to harm innocent others. An increasing number of philosophers and ethicists make use of such findings, and some of them have argued that this so-called situationist challenge fatally undermines virtue ethics. As virtue (...)
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  25.  5
    Just War Reconsidered: Strategy, Ethics and Theory, by James M. Dubik.Logan B. Sisson - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):121-123.
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  26.  2
    Editors’ Introduction: Are We All the Same?Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):1-1.
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  27.  4
    What Sticks? The Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Course in Military Ethics and its Perceived Outcomes.Eva van Baarle, Laura Hartman, Desiree Verweij, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):56-77.
    Ethics training has become a common phenomenon in the training of military professionals at all levels. However, the perceived outcomes of this training remain open. In this article, we analyze the experiences of course participants who were interviewed 6–12 months after they had participated in a train-the-trainer course in military ethics developed by the Faculty of Military Sciences of the Netherlands Defence Academy. Through qualitative inductive analysis, it is shown how participants evaluate the training, how they perceive the development of (...)
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  28.  6
    Keeping David From Bathsheba: The Four-Star General’s Staff as Nathan.Brett D. Weigle & Charles D. Allen - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):94-113.
    Readers of reports on ethical failures by four-star general officers must wonder, “Don’t they have staffs to ensure that the general follows ethics rules?” The Department of Defense publishes robust ethics guidance in several documents; however, a staff’s best efforts to implement this guidance may fail to make an impression on a senior leader who is susceptible to the “Bathsheba syndrome,” an allusion to the biblical account where the prophet Nathan rebuked King David for his moral failings. This paper proposes (...)
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