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  1.  1
    The Just Warrior Ethos: A Response to Colonel Riza.Joseph O. Chapa & David J. Blair - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):170-186.
    In 2014, Colonel M. Shane Riza published an article in this journal arguing that remotely piloted aircraft and robotic weapons threaten the US Air Force’s warrior ethos. Riza has clearly articulated the sentiments of one side of a vibrant debate within our service. This paper presents an alternative view; a view held by some who have experienced these new forms and tools of war, and who have wrestled with their implications first-hand. In this paper, we address some methodological concerns with (...)
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  2.  1
    The Normative Implications of “Knowing the Future” for Preventive War.Ariel Colonomos - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):205-226.
    What if claims about the future informed us about the intentions and the capabilities of our opponents to wage war against ourselves? Would and should the existing norms that restrict the preventive use of force change in the wake of such transformation? This article highlights the potential normative consequences of this change and discriminates between several possible normative evolutions. Would and should the “knowability of the future” alter radically the traditional rule of self-defense? This rule could indeed be jeopardized but, (...)
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  3. Playing to the Edge. American Intelligence in the Age of Terror, by Michael V. Hayden. [REVIEW]James L. Cook - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):250-255.
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  4. Defect or Defend: Military Responses to Popular Protests in Authoritarian Asia, by Terence Lee. [REVIEW]Monir Hossain Moni - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):246-249.
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  5.  1
    Iran’s Nuclear Fatwa: Analysis of a Debate.Mohammad Hossein Sabouri - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):227-245.
    For more than a decade, Iran has been referring to a fatwa issued by its Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei, proscribing nuclear weapons. The fatwa, however, not only failed to influence the process that led to the resolution of Iran’s nuclear crisis, but also has been met with a good deal of skepticism. The most commonly held suspicions about the credibility of the fatwa can be summed up in five central questions: Has the nuclear fatwa actually been issued? Does the fatwa (...)
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  6.  2
    Rethinking Military Virtue Ethics in an Age of Unmanned Weapons.Marcus Schulzke - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):187-204.
    Although most styles of military ethics are hybrids that draw on multiple ethical theories, they are usually based primarily on the model of Aristotelian virtue ethics. Virtue ethics is well-suited for regulating the conduct of soldiers who have to make quick decisions on the battlefield, but its applicability to military personnel is threatened by the growing use of unmanned weapon systems. These weapons disrupt virtue ethics’ institutional and cultural basis by changing what it means to display virtue and transforming the (...)
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  7. Editors’ Introduction.Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (3):169-169.
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  8.  3
    Great-Power Responsibility, Side-Effect Harms and American Drone Strikes in Pakistan.Wali Aslam - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):143-162.
    ABSTRACTIn International Relations, the actions of great powers are usually assessed through their direct effects. Great powers are generally considered to be responsible for the consequences of their actions if they intentionally caused them. Although there is discussion on “double-effects” and “side-effect harms” in the realms of philosophy and political sociology, these largely remain absent from the field of IR. This article bridges that gap by clarifying a set of yardsticks through which side-effect harms of great powers’ actions can be (...)
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  9.  2
    The Harmful and Residual Effects on Civilians by Bombing Dual-Purpose Facilities.Todd Burkhardt - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):81-99.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses what we owe to the civilians of a state with which we are militarily engaged. The old notion of noncombatant immunity needs to be rethought within the context of both human rights and into the postwar phase. No doubt, civilians will be killed in war. However, much more can be done during and after the fighting to protect civilians’ basic human rights from the ills of war. I argue for making belligerents accountable ex post by requiring them (...)
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  10. Editors' Introduction.Martin L. Cook & Henrik Syse - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):79-80.
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  11. The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace, by Nolen Gertz.Matthew Hallgarth - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):163-165.
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  12. Beyond Just War: Military Strategy for the Common Good.David Lonsdale - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):100-121.
    ABSTRACTThe objective of this article is to move ethical discourse on military strategy beyond the confines of the established War Convention. This is achieved by utilising the common good, a concept found in political philosophy and theology. The common good acts as a positive organising concept for socio-political activity. With its focus on peace, development and the flourishing of the individual and community, the common good poses a significant challenge to strategy. This article constructs an approach to strategy that is (...)
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  13. To Kill Nations: American Strategy in the Air-Atomic Age and the Rise of Mutually Assured Destruction, by Edward Kaplan.John Mark Mattox - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):166-168.
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  14. Hiding Death: Contextualizing the Dover Ban.Kayce Mobley - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (2):122-142.
    ABSTRACTFollowing the terrorist attacks against the US in 2001, the Bush administration reaffirmed the Dover ban, the policy that prohibited press coverage of military coffins arriving at Dover Air Force Base from conflicts abroad. Conventional wisdom holds that the Bush administration enforced the ban in the hope of maintaining public support for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. This understanding, though, is incomplete. If the Dover ban were enforced only in response to eroding public opinion, then other coalition states would (...)
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  15.  8
    Case Study Commentary and Analysis: The Moral Sword of Damocles.David M. Barnes - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):58-64.
    ABSTRACTCase summary, by James Cook :In the final issue of the 2015 volume of the Journal of Military Ethics, we published a case study entitled “Coining an Ethical Dilemma: The Impunity of Afghanistan’s Indigenous Security Forces”, written by Paul Lushenko. The study detailed two extra-judicial killings by Afghan National Police personnel in an area stabilized and overseen by a US-led Combined Task Force. To deter further EJKs following the first incident, the CTF’s commander reported the incidents up his chain of (...)
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  16.  3
    Chinese Just War Ethics: Origin, Development, and Dissent, Edited by Ping-Cheung Lo and Sumner B. Twiss.John Choo & George R. Wilkes - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):65-68.
  17.  4
    The Need for an Ethical Fitness Assessment in the US Armed Forces.August R. Immel - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):3-17.
    ABSTRACTWhile many attempts have been made to institutionalize ethical training in the United States Armed Forces, the intended aim of each undertaking – changing the overall perception, understanding, and appreciation of ethics – is not fully achieved. Additionally – and conspicuously absent from each of the ethical initiatives of the warfighting institution – no method to evaluate and assess the ethical behavior of its members exists in the Armed Forces. Because Service members do not have a standard from which to (...)
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  18.  39
    A Critique of the Right Intention Condition as an Element of Jus Ad Bellum.Greg Janzen - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):36-57.
    According to just war theory, a resort to war is justified only if it satisfies the right intention condition. This article offers a critical examination of this condition, defending the thesis that, despite its venerable history as part of the just war tradition, it ought to be jettisoned. When properly understood, it turns out to be an unnecessary element of jus ad bellum, adding nothing essential to our assessments of the justice of armed conflict.
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  19.  4
    Binary Bullets: The Ethics of Cyberwarfare, Edited by Fitz Allhoff, Adam Henschke and Bradley Jay Strawser.Paul Lushenko - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):69-73.
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  20.  4
    Right Intention and the Ends of War.Duncan Purves & Ryan Jenkins - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):18-35.
    ABSTRACTThe jus ad bellum criterion of right intention is a central guiding principle of just war theory. It asserts that a country’s resort to war is just only if that country resorts to war for the right reasons. However, there is significant confusion, and little consensus, about how to specify the CRI. We seek to clear up this confusion by evaluating several distinct ways of understanding the criterion. On one understanding, a state’s resort to war is just only if it (...)
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  21.  4
    Military Chaplains in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Beyond: Advisement and Leader Engagement in Highly Religious Environments, Edited by Eric Patterson.Jeremy S. Stirm - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):74-76.
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  22.  2
    Intentions and Mindsets.Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook - 2016 - Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):1-2.
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