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  1. Iracionalita racionálního kompatibilismu.Lukáš Novák - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (7):131-172.
    This discussion article is a critique of the theory of “rational compatibilism”, as presented in D. Peroutka’s eponymous article. The author raises the following nine objections against Peroutka’s conception: Peroutka’s notion of liberty is ill-defined; Peroutka’s argument “from growing probability” suffers from the confusion of logical and epistemic probability; the charge of “irrationality” raised against the libertarian analysis of choice is either unsubstantiated or innocuous; assigning the determining force to a final cause makes no difference with regard to freedom; it (...)
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  2. Doctrina de connotatis v barokně-scholastické diskusi.Lukáš Novák - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (6):105-128.
    In Baroque scholasticism the medieval semantic theory of connotation as a property of terms, originally elaborated by Ockham and others, received an ontological application or re-interpretation in the context of the theory of relations. The main proponent of this ontologized “doctrina de connotatis” seems to have been Suárez. Subsequently, this doctrine was severely criticised by the Jesuits Pedro Hurtado de Mendoza and Rodrigo de Arriaga, but also by the “princeps Scotistarum” Bartholomeo Mastri; whereas another Scotist, John Punch, adopted a theory (...)
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  3. Scholastický příspěvek k ideálu jednoty lidstva a jejímu politickému vyjádření v 16. a 17. století v kontextu předchozího a následného vývoje. [REVIEW]Roman Míčka - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (5):69-102.
    This paper is concerned with the idea of unity of mankind and the possibilities of its political expression, particularly with respect to the contribution of the Spanish scholastics Francisco de Vitoria and Francisco Suárez, who gave a crucial impetus to the development of the concept of ius gentium. Then it discusses how the issue was developed in the work of Hugo Grotius and how political expression of the unity of mankind was reflected on in modern scholasticism — in the work (...)
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  4. Tomáš Akvinský instrumentalistou v matematice?Lukáš Novák - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (4):41-66.
    P. Sousedík and D. Svoboda, in their paper “Různá pojetí matematiky u vybraných autorů od antiky po raný novověk: Je matematika teoretická věda nebo pouhá technika?”, proposed an interpretation of Aquinas’s understanding of the nature of mathematics which the author regards as unsatisfactory. The purpose of this review article is to point out its problems and to suggest in its stead an adequate interpretation of Aquinas’s mind, on the basis of a detailed analysis of his texts. The author shows that (...)
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  5.  8
    Vnímání, kauzalita a pozornost: Roger Bacon a Petr Olivi.Lukáš Lička - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (3):1-38.
    [Sensation, Causality, and Attention: Roger Bacon and Peter Olivi] This paper investigates what conditions are to be met for sensory perception to occur. It introduces two diff erent theories of perception that were held by two medieval Franciscan thinkers — namely, Roger Bacon (1214/1220–1292) and Peter Olivi (ca. 1248–1298). Bacon analyses especially the causal relation between the object and the sensory organ in his doctrine of the multiplication of species. In his view, a necessary condition of perception is the reception (...)
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  6. Elliptical Orbits and the Aristotelian Scientific Revolution Comment on Groarke.James Franklin - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):169-179.
    The Scientific Revolution was far from the anti-Aristotelian movement traditionally pictured. Its applied mathematics pursued by new means the Aristotelian ideal of science as knowledge by insight into necessary causes. Newton’s derivation of Kepler’s elliptical planetary orbits from the inverse square law of gravity is a central example.
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  7.  2
    Can Aristotelianism Make Sense of Perihelion–Aphelion Orbits?Louis Groarke - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):121-168.
    In general historical treatments, one often encounters the idea that Kepler’s and Newton’s discovery of elliptical planetary orbits marked a decisive break with tradition and definitively undermined any possibility of an Aristotelian approach to physics and astronomy. Although Aristotle had no understanding of gravity, I want to demonstrate that elliptical orbits were a refinement of earlier models and that one can produce an Aristotelian account of elliptical orbits once one corrects his crucial mistake about gravity. One interesting side-effect of this (...)
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  8. The Fourfold Division of Opposition in Questions on Aristotle’s “Categories” by Benedict Hesse, Paul of Pyskowice and in the Oldest Cracow Commentary on the Categories Preserved in Cod. Bj 1941.Mansfeld Monika - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):101-120.
    In the first half of the 15ᵗʰ century there was a coherent philosophical system of teaching at the Jagiellonian university, so-called ars vetus, concerning the interpretation of three treatises: Aristotle’s Categories and Hermeneutics and Porphyry’s Isagoge. The question-commentaries on the Categories that have been preserved in several manuscripts show astonishing similarity in solving individual problems – there are three copies of Benedict Hesse’s commentary and one copy of Paul of Pyskowice’s work, moreover, in BJ 1941 there is an anonymous commentary (...)
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  9.  6
    Butchvarov on the Dehumanization of Philosophy.William F. Vallicella - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (2):181-196.
    This review article examines Panayot Butchvarov’s claim that philosophy in its three main branches, epistemology, ethics, and metaphysics, needs to be freed from anthropocentrism.
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  10.  2
    Cajetan of Thiene on the Logic of Paradox.Miroslav Hanke - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (1):71-95.
    In the first half of the fifteenth century, the Italian logician, natural philosopher, and doctor of medicine Cajetan of Thiene wrote a commentary on William Heytesbury’s Regulae solvendi sophismata, which later became a part of the printed edition of Heytesbury’s treatises. Several late fifteenth century reprints sustained its circulation and further influence. Following Heytesbury, Cajetan listed four alternative treatments of paradoxes, where the first three were formulated in general logico-semantic terms and the last one in terms of obligationes. The present (...)
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  11.  16
    Towards a Robust Hylomorphism.John Kronen & Sandra Menssen - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (1):5-43.
    Over the past fi fty years or so analytic philosophers have developed accounts of the nature of material objects that can plausibly be described as neo-Aristotelian. We argue that what we term non-robust neo-Aristotelian accounts of hylomorphism fail: if hylomorphism is true, then some species of robust hylomorphism is true. In Section 2 we explain what we take non-robust and robust hylomorphism to be and distinguish two species of non-robust hylomorphism. In Section 3 we examine Aquinas’s definition of substance. It (...)
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  12.  4
    The Modal Argument for the Soul / Body Dualism.Ľuboš Rojka - 2016 - Studia Neoaristotelica 13 (1):45-70.
    The modal argument for the existence of a Cartesian human soul proposed by Richard Swinburne more than thirty years ago, if slightly adjusted and interpreted correctly, becomes a plausible argument for anyone who accepts modal arguments. The difficulty consists in a relatively weak justification of the second premise, of the real possibility of a disembodied existence, as a result of which the argument does not provide a real proof. The argument is best understood in the following terms: Special divine action (...)
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