Year:

  1.  40
    Perception as a Multi-Stage Process: A Reidian Account.Marina Folescu - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):57-74.
    The starting point of this paper is Thomas Reid's anti-skepticism: our knowledge of the external world is justified. The justificatory process, in his view, starts with and relies upon one of the main faculties of the human mind: perception. Reid's theory of perception has been thoroughly studied, but there are some missing links in the explanatory chain offered by the secondary literature. In particular, I will argue that we do not have a complete picture of the mechanism of perception of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  6
    Impartiality Through ‘Moral Optics’: Why Adam Smith Revised David Hume's Moral Sentimentalism.Christel Fricke & Maria Alejandra Carrasco - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):1-18.
    We read Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments as a critical response to David Hume's moral theory. While both share a commitment to moral sentimentalism, they propose different ways of meeting its main challenge, that is, explaining how judgments informed by sentiments can nevertheless have a justified claim to general authority. This difference is particularly manifest in their respective accounts of ‘moral optics’, or the way they rely on the analogy between perceptual and moral judgments. According to Hume, making perceptual (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  2
    Otto Pipatti, Morality Made Visible: Edward Westermarck's Moral and Social Theory.Aaron Garrett - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):91-94.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Religion, Evolution and Scottish Philosophy.Gordon Graham - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):75-89.
    This paper explores developments in the defence of theism within Scottish philosophy following Hume's Dialogues and the advent of Darwinian evolutionary biology. By examining the writings of two nineteenth-century Scottish philosophers, it aims to show that far from Darwinian biology completing Hume's destruction of natural theology, it prompted a new direction for the defence of philosophical theism. Henry Calderwood and Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison occupied, respectively, the Chairs of Moral Philosophy and Logic and Metaphysics at the University of Edinburgh in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Thomas Carlyle, Scotland's Migrant Philosophers, and Canadian Idealism, C. 1870–1914.Alexander Jordan - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):39-56.
    That the great Scottish man of letters Thomas Carlyle exercised a formative influence over late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century ‘British Idealism’ has long been recognized by historians. Through works such as Sartor Resartus, Heroes and Hero-Worship, Past and Present, and Latter-Day Pamphlets, Carlyle transmitted his ideas regarding the immanence of the divine in nature and man, the infinite character of duty, and the ethical role of the state to a generation of subsequent philosophers. The following article will extend this insight, arguing that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  6
    Hume's General Point of View, Smith's Impartial Spectator, and the Moral Value of Interacting with Outsiders.John McHugh - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):19-37.
    Here is an appealing position: one reason to pursue interaction with people from backgrounds that differ from our own is that doing so can improve our moral judgment. As some scholars have noticed, this position seems pedigreed by support from the famed philosophers of human sociability, David Hume and Adam Smith. But regardless of whether Hume or Smith personally held anything like the appealing position, neither might have had theoretically grounded reason to do so. In fact, both philosophers explain moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues