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  1.  3
    Thomas Reid: Philosophy, Science, and the Christian Revelation.Roberto Di Ceglie - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):17-38.
    Two significant aspects of Thomas Reid's thought seem to be irreconcilable with one another. On the one hand, Reid constantly refers to the substantive benefits which human knowledge receives from the Christian revelation. On the other hand, he does not justify philosophical or scientific beliefs by way of appeal to God. In this essay, I argue that a closer inspection of both Reid's philosophical reflection and scientific investigations shows that the two aspects just mentioned are compatible with one another. In (...)
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  2.  63
    A Humean Approach to the Boundaries of the Moral Domain.Mark Collier - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):1-16.
    Hume maintains that the boundaries of morality are widely drawn in everyday life. We routinely blame characters for traits that we find disgusting, on this account, as well as those which we perceive as being harmful. Contemporary moral psychology provides further evidence that human beings have a natural tendency to moralize traits that produce feelings of repugnance. But recent work also demonstrates a significant amount of individual variation in our sensitivities to disgust. We have sufficient reason to bracket this emotion, (...)
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  3.  3
    Hume's Missing Shade of Blue: A New Solution.Brian D. Earp - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):91-104.
    What to do with the missing shade of blue? Some have argued that Hume's famous thought experiment undermines his central doctrine – the ‘copy principle’ – such that he should have revised his whole theory in light of it. Others contend that the MSB is not a true or actual counterexample to the copy principle, but merely an apparent or conceivable one, so that he had no such obligation to revise. In this essay, I argue that even if the MSB (...)
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  4.  2
    Assembling the Enlightened Scots: Fifty Years of Research.Roger L. Emerson - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):105-111.
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  5.  2
    ‘I Am Greatly Obliged to the Dutch’: James Beattie's Dutch Connection.Joost Hengstmengel - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):67-90.
    In the second half of the 18th century, Scottish Enlightenment philosophy spread to the Dutch Republic, where it found a favourable reception. The most popular Scottish philosopher among Dutch intellectuals arguably was James Beattie of Aberdeen. Almost all of his prose works were translated into Dutch, and the Zeeland Society of Sciences elected him a foreign honorary member. It made Beattie remark that he was ‘greatly obliged to the Dutch’, and a Dutch learned journal that he had ‘in a sense (...)
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  6.  6
    Hume and the Guise of the Bad.Francesco Orsi - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):39-56.
    In Treatise 2.3.4.5 Hume provides an explanation of why ‘we naturally desire what is forbid, and take a pleasure in performing actions, merely because they are unlawful’. Hume's explanation of this phenomenon has barely received any attention so far. But a detailed analysis bears fruit for both Humean scholarship and contemporary moral psychology. After putting the passage in its context, I explain why desiring and taking pleasure in performing certain actions merely because they are unlawful poses a challenge to Hume's (...)
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  7.  1
    American Indian Inferiority in Hume's Second Enquiry.Rodney Roberts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):57-66.
    It is fairly well known that Hume added a footnote to his essay ‘Of National Characters’ in which he asserts that all non-white peoples are naturally inferior to white people. Subsequently, he revised the note to assert only that black people are naturally inferior to white people. But while the view expressed in this footnote has been described as ‘shockingly bigoted’, and even as his ‘racial law,’ it is still commonly thought that in Hume's voluminous writings it is apparently just (...)
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  8. Charles Bradford Bow (Ed.), Common Sense in the Scottish Enlightenment.Max Skjönsberg - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):113-116.
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