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  1.  6
    Doxastic Naturalism and Hume's Voice in the Dialogues.C. M. Lorkowski - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):253-274.
    I argue that acknowledging Hume as a doxastic naturalist about belief in a deity allows an elegant, holistic reading of his Dialogues. It supports a reading in which Hume's spokesperson is Philo throughout, and enlightens many of the interpretive difficulties of the work. In arguing this, I perform a comprehensive survey of evidence for and against Philo as Hume's voice, bringing new evidence to bear against the interpretation of Hume as Cleanthes and against the amalgamation view while correcting several standard (...)
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  2.  7
    Who Placed the Eye in the Center of a Sphere? Speculations About the Origins of Thomas Reid's Geometry of Visibles.Hannes Ole Matthiessen - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):231-251.
    Thomas Reid argued that the geometrical properties of visible figures equal the geometrical properties of their projections on the inside of a sphere centred around the eye. In recent scholarship there are only a few suggestions of which sources might have inspired Reid. I point to a widely ignored body of early eighteenth-century literature – introductions into projective geometry, the use of celestial globes and astronomy – in which the model of the eye in the centre of a sphere was (...)
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  3.  20
    Re-Evaluating Reid's Response to Skepticism.Blake McAllister - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):317-339.
    I argue that some of the most prominent interpretations of Reid's response to skepticism marginalize a crucial aspect of his thought: namely, that our common sense beliefs meet whatever normative standards of rationality the skeptic might fairly demand of them. This should be seen as supplementary to reliabilist or proper functionalist interpretations of Reid, which often ignore this half of the story. I also show how Reid defends the rationality of believing first principles by appealing to their naturalness and irresistibility. (...)
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  4.  4
    Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Elements in Hume.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):275-296.
    For the last forty years, Hume's Newtonianism has been a debated topic in Hume scholarship. The crux of the matter can be formulated by the following question: Is Hume a Newtonian philosopher? Debates concerning this question have produced two lines of interpretation. I shall call them ‘traditional’ and ‘critical’ interpretations. The traditional interpretation asserts that there are many Newtonian elements in Hume, whereas the critical interpretation seriously questions this. In this article, I consider the main points made by both lines (...)
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  5.  5
    Reid and the State Conceptual/Nonconceptual Apprehension Distinction: A Reply to Wolterstorff.F. Adam Sopuck - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):297-316.
    There is an interesting controversy in recent literature over the nature of Reid's theory of perception. Interpreters are divided over whether Reid's theory of perception is compatible with an acquaintance model of perception. This article discusses Nicholas Wolterstorff's objections to the acquaintance interpretation of Reid. I argue that these objections are inadequate insofar as they do not account for the possibility that Reid offers a ‘state conceptual’ – rather than a ‘state nonconceptual’ – acquaintance theory of perception. I provide textual (...)
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  6.  4
    Robert Zaretsky, Boswell's Enlightenment.Thomas Ahnert - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):170-171.
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  7.  6
    Rebecca Copenhaver and Todd Buras , Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge, and Value.Adam Weiler Gur Arye - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):190-193.
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  8.  3
    Gordon Graham , Scottish Philosophy in the Nineteenth & Twentieth Centuries.Charles Bradford Bow - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):224-229.
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  9.  10
    Don Garrett, Hume.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):165-170.
  10.  1
    Silvia Sebastiani, The Scottish Enlightenment: Race, Gender and the Limits of Progress.Emily Dumler-Winckler - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):208-211.
  11.  1
    George Turnbull, Education for Life: Correspondence and Writings on Religion and Practical Philosophy, Edited by M.A. Stewart and Paul Wood.James J. S. Foster - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):187-190.
  12.  3
    Sarah Hutton, British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century.Giovanni Gellera - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):211-213.
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  13.  2
    Leslie Ellen Brown, Artful Virtue: The Interplay of the Beautiful and the Good in the Scottish Enlightenment.Gordon Graham - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):205-208.
  14.  4
    Stephen Cowley, Rational Piety and Social Reform in Glasgow: The Life, Philosophy, and Political Economy of James Mylne.Gordon Graham - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):172-174.
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  15.  3
    Giovanni Grandi , Thomas Reid: Selected Philosophical Writings.John Haldane - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):178-183.
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  16.  6
    Istvan Hont, Politics in Commercial Society: Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Smith.James A. Harris - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):151-163.
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  17.  3
    Aaron Garrett and James A. Harris , Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century: Morals, Politics, Art, Religion.Esther Engels Kroeker - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):218-224.
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  18.  5
    Andre C. Willis, Toward a Humean True Religion: Genuine Theism, Moderate Hope and Practical Morality.Willem Lemmens - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):193-196.
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  19.  1
    Thomas Ahnert, The Moral Culture of Scottish Enlightenment, 1690–1805. [REVIEW]Christian Maurer - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):200-205.
  20.  3
    Knud Haakonssen and Paul Wood, Thomas Reid on Society and Politics: Papers and Lectures.Douglas McDermid - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):174-178.
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  21.  8
    James Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography.Wade L. Robison - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):137-151.
  22.  3
    Aaron Garrett , The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy.Nathan Sasser - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):213-218.
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  23.  5
    Jacqueline A. Taylor, Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy.Nathan Sasser - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):183-187.
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  24.  2
    Matthew B. Arbo, Political Vanity: Adam Ferguson on the Moral Tensions of Early Capitalism.Craig Smith - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):197-200.
  25.  8
    Reid's Principle of Credulity as a Principle of Charity.Adam Weiler Gur Arye - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):69-83.
    Reid's principle of credulity may be interpreted as equivalent to a principle of charity, due to the nature of three beliefs it implies concerning the interlocutors, which are held by the person who attempts to acquire their language: They are telling truth in the sense that they are saying what they really think, perceive, feel, believe; they are veracious in the sense that what they say is objectively true; they use language consistently. This interpretation relies on Reid's straightforward remarks on (...)
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  26.  8
    Thomas Reid on Causation and Scientific Explanation.Manuel Barrantes & Juan M. Durán - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):51-67.
    We argue that there is no tension between Reid's description of science and his claim that science is based on the principles of common sense. For Reid, science is rooted in common sense since it is based on the idea that fixed laws govern nature. This, however, does not contradict his view that the scientific notions of causation and explanation are fundamentally different from their common sense counterparts. After discussing these points, we dispute with Cobb's and Benbaji's interpretations of Reid's (...)
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  27.  12
    Maclaurin on Occasionalism: A Reply to Ablondi.Patrick J. Connolly - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):125-135.
    In a recent article Fred Ablondi compares the different approaches to occasionalism put forward by two eighteenth-century Newtonians, Colin Maclaurin and Andrew Baxter. The goal of this short essay is to respond to Ablondi by clarifying some key features of Maclaurin's views on occasionalism and the cause of gravitational attraction. In particular, I explore Maclaurin's matter theory, his views on the explanatory limits of mechanism, and his appeals to the authority of Newton. This leads to a clearer picture of the (...)
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  28.  9
    Narrative and History in Hume's Moral Epistemology.Erin Frykholm - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):21-50.
    Hume's moral epistemology, focusing on the elevation of character tratis, requires what in contemporary terms is a narrative structure. The moral significance of an action can only be understood when considered in relation to an agent's past actions, beliefs, intentions, social environment and situation. Three features of Hume's writings support this claim: his accounts of moral evidence, of the object of moral evaluation, and of the value of history. Without recognizing the role of narrative, the standard view of Hume's moral (...)
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  29.  2
    .Gordon Graham - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):v-v.
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  30.  8
    Reid's Response to Hume's Moral Critique of Religion.Esther Engels Kroeker - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):85-100.
    My aim in this paper is to present Reid's answer to Hume's claim that religion is contrary to natural human moral passions. Religion, according to Hume, weakens natural human inclinations toward virtue and invents new species of merit. Reid would respond, first, that morality is indeed tied to human nature, and that Hume fails to recognize that a sense of justice is natural as well. Since justice does not arise within human social conventions, Reid would conclude that justice is not (...)
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  31.  6
    Hume and Utilitarianism: Another Look at an Age-Old Question.Massimo Reichlin - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):1-20.
    The discussion on the relationship between Hume and utilitarianism has been lively for many decades. To contribute to this discussion, I identify four main features of a utilitarian view: a) a consequentialist theory of the right, b) a hedonist theory of the good, c) some kind of impartiality in evaluating consequences, and d) an essentially prescriptive, rather than merely explicative, attitude. I then show that, first, although he borrowed the word ‘utility’ from Hume, Bentham did not consider Hume as a (...)
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  32.  53
    Hutcheson's Theological Objection to Egoism.John J. Tilley - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):101-123.
    Francis Hutcheson's objections to psychological egoism usually appeal to experience or introspection. However, at least one of them is theological: It includes premises of a religious kind, such as that God rewards the virtuous. This objection invites interpretive and philosophical questions, some of which may seem to highlight errors or shortcomings on Hutcheson's part. Also, to answer the questions is to point out important features of Hutcheson's objection and its intellectual context. And nowhere in the scholarship on Hutcheson do we (...)
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