Bioethics

ISSN: 0269-9702

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  1.  11
    Reply to Rawls's, race, and 20th century bioethics.Robert Baker - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):578-580.
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  2.  10
    Precision medicine and distributive justice: Wicked problems for democratic deliberation By Leonard M.Fleck, Oxford University Press. 2023. xxvii + 404 pp. $82.00. [REVIEW]Yoann Della Croce - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):581-582.
  3.  7
    Four shades of paternalism in doctor–patient communication and their ethical implications.Anniken Fleisje - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):539-548.
    The present study aims to explore the forms paternalistic communication can take in doctor–patient interactions and how they should be considered from a normative perspective. In contemporary philosophical debate, the problem with paternalism is often perceived as either undermining autonomy (the autonomy problem) or the paternalist viewing their judgment as superior (the superiority problem). In either case, paternalism is problematized mainly in a general, theoretical sense. In contrast, this paper investigates specific doctor–patient encounters, revealing distinct types of paternalistic communication. For (...)
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  4.  11
    Ethical challenges in health care during collective hunger strikes in public or occupied spaces.Dominik Haselwarter, Katja Kuehlmeyer & Verina Wild - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):549-557.
    Public collective hunger strikes take place in complex social and political contexts, require medical attention and present ethical challenges to physicians. Empirical research, the ethical debate to date and existing guidelines by the World Medical Association focus almost exclusively on hunger strikes in detention. However, the public space differs substantially with regard to the conditions for the provision of health care and the diverse groups of healthcare providers or stakeholders involved. By reviewing empirical research on the experience of health professionals (...)
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  5.  10
    Can digital health democratize health care?Tereza Hendl & Ayush Shukla - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):491-502.
    Much has been said about the potential of digital health technologies for democratizing health care. But how exactly is democratization with digital health technologies conceptualized and what does it involve? We investigate debates on the democratization of health care with digital health and identify that democratization is being envisioned as a matter of access to health information, health care, and patient empowerment. However, taking a closer look at the growing pool of empirical data on digital health, we argue that these (...)
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  6.  4
    Creating a safer and better functioning system: Lessons to be learned from the Netherlands for an ethical defence of an autonomy‐only approach to assisted dying.Tessa Jane Holzman - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):558-565.
    The proposal to allow assisted dying for people who are not severely ill reignited the Dutch end‐of‐life debate when it was submitted in 2016. A key criticism of this proposal is that it is too radical a departure from the safe and well‐functioning system the Netherlands already has. The goal of this article is to respond to this criticism and question whether the Dutch system really can be described as safe and well functioning. I will reconsider the usefulness of the (...)
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  7.  17
    Patient‐led innovation and global health justice: Open‐source digital health technology for type 1 diabetes care.Bianca Jansky, Tereza Hendl & Azakhiwe Z. Nocanda - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):511-528.
    Health innovation is mainly envisioned in direct connection to medical research institutions or pharmaceutical and technology companies. Yet, these types of innovation often do not meet the needs and expectations of individuals affected by health conditions. With the emergence of digital health technologies and social media, we can observe a shift, which involves people living with illness modifying and improving medical and health devices outside of the formal research and development sector, figuring both as users and innovators. This patient‐led innovation (...)
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  8.  20
    Mobile health technology and empowerment.Karola V. Kreitmair - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):481-490.
    Mobile Health (m-health) technologies, such as wearables, apps, and smartwatches, are increasingly viewed as tools for improving health and well-being. In particular, such technologies are conceptualized as means for laypersons to master their own health, by becoming “engaged” and “empowered” “managers” of their bodies and minds. One notion that is especially prevalent in the discussions around m-health technology is that of empowerment. In this paper, I analyze the notion of empowerment at play in the m-health arena, identifying five elements that (...)
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  9.  2
    NIPT for adult‐onset conditions: Australian NIPT users' views.India R. Marks, Katrien Devolder, Hilary Bowman-Smart, Molly Johnston & Catherine Mills - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):566-575.
    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has become widely available in recent years. While initially used to screen for trisomies 21, 18, and 13, the test has expanded to include a range of other conditions and will likely expand further. This paper addresses the ethical issues that arise from one particularly controversial potential use of NIPT: screening for adult‐onset conditions (AOCs). We report data from our quantitative survey of Australian NIPT users' views on the ethical issues raised by NIPT for AOCs. The (...)
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  10.  11
    New perspectives on women's reproductive rights.Mansoureh Moaya, Shadab Shahali, Minoor Lamyian, Alireza Milanifar & Seyed-Mohammad Azin - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):585-586.
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  11.  10
    Rawls, race, and the 20th‐century bioethics.Akshay Pendyal - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):576-577.
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  12.  5
    Does a lack of emotions make chatbots unfit to be psychotherapists?Mehrdad Rahsepar Meadi, Justin S. Bernstein, Neeltje Batelaan, Anton J. L. M. van Balkom & Suzanne Metselaar - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):503-510.
    Mental health chatbots (MHCBs) designed to support individuals in coping with mental health issues are rapidly advancing. Currently, these MHCBs are predominantly used in commercial rather than clinical contexts, but this might change soon. The question is whether this use is ethically desirable. This paper addresses a critical yet understudied concern: assuming that MHCBs cannot have genuine emotions, how this assumption may affect psychotherapy, and consequently the quality of treatment outcomes. We argue that if MHCBs lack emotions, they cannot have (...)
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  13.  1
    The ethics of mHealth as a global phenomenon.Verina Wild, Tereza Hendl & Bianca Jansky - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):479-480.
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  14.  6
    Mental patient—Psychiatric ethics from a patient's perspective By AbigailGosselin, Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. 2022. 308pp. $45.00 (Paperback), ISBN: 9780262544313. [REVIEW]Sam Wilkinson - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (6):583-584.
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  15.  28
    Navigating conflicts of reproductive rights: Unbundling parenthood and balancing competing interests.Dorian Accoe & Guido Pennings - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):425-430.
    Advances in assisted reproductive technologies can give rise to several ethical challenges. One of these challenges occurs when the reproductive desires of two individuals become incompatible and conflict. To address such conflicts, it is important to unbundle different aspects of (non)parenthood and to recognize the corresponding reproductive rights. This article starts on the premise that the six reproductive rights—the right (not) to be a gestational, genetic, and social parent—are negative rights that do not entail a right to assistance. Since terminating (...)
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  16.  3
    Commercialization and the Olympics: A step too far?Ruth Chadwick - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):381-382.
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  17.  21
    Arguments for a ban on pediatric intersex surgery: A dis/analogy with Jehovah witness blood transfusion.Catherine Clune-Taylor - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):460-468.
    This article argues for a ban on the performance of medically unnecessary genital normalizing surgeries as part of assigning a binary sex/gender to infants with intersex conditions on the basis of autonomy, regardless of etiology. It does this via a dis/analogy with the classic case in bioethics of Jehovah Witness (JW) parents' inability to refuse life-saving blood transfusions for their minor children. Both cases address ethical medical practice in situations where parents are making irreversible medical decisions on the basis of (...)
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  18.  7
    On subjective measures of decision quality.Jasper Debrabander - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):438-444.
    In times of person-centered care, it is all the more important to support patients in making good decisions about their care. One way to offer such support to patients is by way of Patient Decision Aids (PDAs). Ranging from patient brochures to web-based tools, PDAs explicitly state the decisions patients face, inform them about their medical options, help them to clarify and discuss their values, and ultimately make a decision. However, lingering discussions surround effectiveness research on PDAs. In this article, (...)
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  19.  20
    A paradigm shift?—On the ethics of medical large language models.Thomas Grote & Philipp Berens - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):383-390.
    After a wave of breakthroughs in image‐based medical diagnostics and risk prediction models, machine learning (ML) has turned into a normal science. However, prominent researchers are claiming that another paradigm shift in medical ML is imminent—due to most recent staggering successes of large language models—from single‐purpose applications toward generalist models, driven by natural language. This article investigates the implications of this paradigm shift for the ethical debate. Focusing on issues like trust, transparency, threats of patient autonomy, responsibility issues in the (...)
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  20.  11
    Stewardship according to context: Justifications for coercive antimicrobial stewardship policies in agriculture and their limitations.Tess Johnson - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):469-476.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an urgent, global threat to public health. The development and implementation of effective measures to address AMR is vitally important but presents important ethical questions. This is a policy area requiring further sustained attention to ensure that policies proposed in National Action Plans on AMR are ethically acceptable and preferable to alternatives that might be fairer or more effective, for instance. By ethically analysing case studies of coercive actions to address AMR across countries, we can better (...)
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  21.  16
    Weighing the moral status of brain organoids and research animals.Julian J. Koplin - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):410-418.
    Recent advances in human brain organoid systems have raised serious worries about the possibility that these in vitro ‘mini‐brains’ could develop sentience, and thus, moral status. This article considers the relative moral status of sentient human brain organoids and research animals, examining whether we have moral reasons to prefer using one over the other. It argues that, contrary to common intuitions, the wellbeing of sentient human brain organoids should not be granted greater moral consideration than the wellbeing of nonhuman research (...)
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  22.  13
    Conscientious refusal or conscientious provision: We can't have both.Ryan Kulesa & Alberto Giubilini - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):445-451.
    Some authors argue that it is permissible for clinicians to conscientiously provide abortion services because clinicians are already allowed to conscientiously refuse to provide certain services. Call this the symmetry thesis. We argue that on either of the two main understandings of the aim of the medical profession—what we will call “pathocentric” and “interest‐centric” views—conscientious refusal and conscientious provision are mutually exclusive. On pathocentric views, refusing to provide a service that takes away from a patient's health is professionally justified because (...)
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  23.  14
    Should the European Medicines Agency consider ageing a disease?Guillermo Marín Penella - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):431-437.
    The classification of ageing as a disease is fundamental to developing new pharmacological strategies that can target said phenomenon. The European Medicines Agency does not do this and maintains a questionable perspective based on the traditional naturalistic argument and the value-free ideal. An alternative is proposed which, inspired by consequentialism, is committed to considering ageing as a disease in European regulatory contexts as long as the ethical consequences are desirable. Within a realistic framework, I show that making this decision would (...)
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  24.  19
    Accounting for future populations in health research.Leah Pierson - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):401-409.
    The research we fund today will improve the health of people who will live tomorrow. But future people will not all benefit equally: decisions we make about what research to prioritize will predictably affect when and how much different people benefit from research. Organizations that fund health research should thus fairly account for the health needs of future populations when setting priorities. To this end, some research funders aim to allocate research resources in accordance with disease burden, prioritizing illnesses that (...)
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  25.  15
    Why restrict medical effective altruism?Travis Quigley - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):452-459.
    In a challenge trial, research subjects are purposefully exposed to some pathogen in a controlled setting, in order to test the efficacy of a vaccine or other experimental treatment. This is an example of medical effective altruism (MEA), where individuals volunteer to risk harms for the public good. Many bioethicists rejected challenge trials in the context of Covid‐19 vaccine research on ethical grounds. After considering various grounds of this objection, I conclude that the crucial question is how much harm research (...)
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  26.  10
    Parthenogenesis, identity, and value.William Simkulet - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):419-424.
    Parthenogenesis is a form of asexual reproduction in which a gamete (ovum or sperm) develops without being fertilized. Tomer Jordi Chaffer uses parthenogenesis to challenge Don Marquis' future-like-ours (FLO) argument against abortion. According to Marquis, (1) what makes it morally wrong to kill us is that it would deprive us of a possible future that we might come to value—a future “like ours” (FLO) and (2) human fetuses are numerically identical to any adult human organism they may develop into, and (...)
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  27.  20
    The selective deployment of AI in healthcare.Robert Vandersluis & Julian Savulescu - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (5):391-400.
    Machine‐learning algorithms have the potential to revolutionise diagnostic and prognostic tasks in health care, yet algorithmic performance levels can be materially worse for subgroups that have been underrepresented in algorithmic training data. Given this epistemic deficit, the inclusion of underrepresented groups in algorithmic processes can result in harm. Yet delaying the deployment of algorithmic systems until more equitable results can be achieved would avoidably and foreseeably lead to a significant number of unnecessary deaths in well‐represented populations. Faced with this dilemma (...)
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  28.  22
    Anchor bias, autonomy, and 20th‐century bioethicists' blindness to racism.Robert Baker - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):275-281.
    The central thesis of this article is that by anchoring bioethics' core conceptual armamentarium in a four-principled theory emphasizing autonomy and treating justice as a principle of allocation, theorists inadvertently biased 20th-century bioethical scholarship against addressing such subjects as ableism, anti-Black racism, classism, and other forms of discrimination, placing them outside of the scope of bioethics research and scholarship. It is also claimed that these scope limitations can be traced to the displacement of the nascent concept of respect for persons—a (...)
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  29.  20
    Xenograft recipients and the right to withdraw from a clinical trial.Christopher Bobier, Daniel J. Hurst, Daniel Rodger & Adam Omelianchuk - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):308-315.
    Preclinical xenotransplantation research using genetically engineered pigs has begun to show some promising results and could one day offer a scalable means of addressing organ shortage. While it is a fundamental tenet of ethical human subject research that participants have a right to withdraw from research once enrolled, several scholars have argued that the right to withdraw from xenotransplant research should be suspended because of the public health risks posed by xenozoonotic transmission. Here, we present a comprehensive critical evaluation of (...)
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  30. Abolishing morality in biomedical ethics.Parker Crutchfield & Scott Scheall - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):316-325.
    In biomedical ethics, there is widespread acceptance of moral realism, the view that moral claims express a proposition and that at least some of these propositions are true. Biomedical ethics is also in the business of attributing moral obligations, such as “S should do X.” The problem, as we argue, is that against the background of moral realism, most of these attributions are erroneous or inaccurate. The typical obligation attribution issued by a biomedical ethicist fails to truly capture the person's (...)
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  31.  17
    The Declaration of Helsinki in bioethics literature since the last revision in 2013.Hans-Jörg Ehni & Urban Wiesing - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):335-343.
    The World Medical Association has announced that a new revision process of the Declaration of Helsinki has been started. This article will identify the criticisms that have been made in the bioethics literature, particularly since the last revision. In addition, criticisms are discussed that were made in the literature even before the last revision and have not fallen silent. The plausibility of the recommendation for a change in the Declaration of Helsinki is examined.
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  32.  16
    Bioethics: What Everyone Needs to Know By Bonnie Steinbock and Paul T. Menzel, New York: Oxford University Press. 2023. pp. 308. $56.86 USD/$85.30 CDN (hardcover). ISBN 97801976579997, $20.95 USD/$20.95 CDN (paperback). ISBN 9780197657966. [REVIEW]Jennifer Flynn - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):375-376.
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  33.  15
    Dying a lonely death: A conceptual and normative analysis.Zohar Lederman - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):282-291.
    This paper argues that a lonely death is, by definition, a bad death and that society as a whole, as well as individuals in society are obligated to assure a certain degree of well‐being, flourishing, or care among and for fellow individuals. Individuals can then be said to have a right against dying a lonely death. Such a right has corresponding duties. The paper further specifies what such duties may entail based on what individuals may need on their deathbed, specifically (...)
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  34.  31
    The social epistemology of eating disorders: How our gaps in understanding challenge patient care.Ji-Young Lee - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):300-307.
    In this article, I argue that various epistemic challenges associated with eating disorders (EDs) can negatively affect the care of already marginalized patient groups with various EDs. I will first outline deficiencies in our understanding of EDs—in research, healthcare settings, and beyond. I will then illustrate with examples cases where discriminatory misconceptions about what EDs are, the presentation and treatment of EDs, and who gets EDs, instantiate obstacles for the treatment of various ED patient groups.
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  35. A Critical Take on Procreative Justice.Joona Räsänen, Andreas Bengtson, Hugo Cossette-Lefebvre & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):367-374.
    Herjeet Kaur Marway recently proposed the Principle of Procreative Justice, which says that reproducers have a strong moral obligation to avoid completing race and colour injustices through their selection choices. In this article, we analyze this principle and argue, appealing to a series of counterexamples, that some of the implications of Marway's Principle of Procreative Justice are difficult to accept. This casts doubt on whether the principle should be adopted. Also, we show that there are some more principled worries regarding (...)
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  36.  32
    Euthanasia, consensual homicide, and refusal of treatment.Eduardo Rivera-López - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):292-299.
    Consensual homicide remains a crime in jurisdictions where active voluntary euthanasia has been legalized. At the same time, both jurisdictions, in which euthanasia is legal and those in which it is not, recognize that all patients (whether severely ill or not) have the right to refuse or withdraw medical treatment (including life-saving treatment). In this paper, I focus on the tensions between these three norms (the permission of active euthanasia, the permission to reject life-saving treatment, and the prohibition of consensual (...)
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  37.  99
    Nature-Versus-Nurture Considered Harmful: Actionability as an Alternative Tool for Understanding the Exposome From an Ethical Perspective.Caspar W. Safarlou, Annelien L. Bredenoord, Roel Vermeulen & Karin R. Jongsma - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):356-366.
    Exposome research is put forward as a major tool for solving the nature-versus-nurture debate because the exposome is said to represent “the nature of nurture.” Against this influential idea, we argue that the adoption of the nature-versus-nurture debate into the exposome research program is a mistake that needs to be undone to allow for a proper bioethical assessment of exposome research. We first argue that this adoption is originally based on an equivocation between the traditional nature-versus-nurture debate and a debate (...)
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  38.  22
    Time to rethink assisted dying?Udo Schuklenk - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):273-274.
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  39.  40
    Cryonics: Traps and transformations.Daniel Story - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):351-355.
    Cryonics is the practice of cryopreserving the bodies or brains of legally dead individuals with the hope that these individuals will be reanimated in the future. A standard argument for cryonics says that cryonics is prudentially justified despite uncertainty about its success because at worst it will leave you no worse off than you otherwise would have been had you not chosen cryonics, and at best it will leave you much better off than you otherwise would have been. Thus, it (...)
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  40.  36
    Social egg freezing and reproductive rights justification: A perspective from China.Zhaochen Wang, Yuzhi Fan & Wenchen Shao - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):326-334.
    Divergences and controversies are inevitable in the discussion of freedoms and rights, especially in the matter of reproduction. The Chinese first social egg freezing lawsuit raises the question: is the freedom to freeze eggs for social reasons justified because it is an instance of reproductive rights? This paper accepts social egg freezing as desirable reproductive freedom, but following Harel's approach and considering two theories of rights, the choice and interest theories of rights, we argue that social egg freezing is not (...)
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  41.  15
    The role of the concept of solidarity for just distribution of bioethical goods in the international area.Nadja Wolf - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):344-350.
    This analysis investigates whether solidarity is an appropriate concept for thinking about justifications for a just distribution of bioethical goods in the international arena. This will be explored by looking at the national origins of the idea of justifying solidarity in the form of the health care that welfare states offer. Following that, ‘life’ and ‘health’ will be placed within a philosophical context by focusing on the main arguments of John Rawls and Amartya Sen and the role of solidarity in (...)
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  42.  30
    Translational bioethics: Reflections on what it can be and how it should work.Kristine Bærøe - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):187-195.
    Translational ethics (TE) has been developed into a specific approach, which revolves around the argument that strategies for bridging the theory‐practice gap in bioethics must themselves be justified on ethical terms. This version of TE incorporates normative, empirical and foundational ethics research and continues to develop through application and in the face of new ethical challenges. Here, I explore the idea that the academic field of bioethics has not yet sufficiently analysed its own philosophical foundation for how it can, and (...)
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  43.  21
    The myth of translational bioethics.Michael Dunn & Mark Sheehan - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):196-203.
    In recent years, the case has been made for special attention to be paid to a branch of research in the field of bioethics called ‘translational bioethics’. In this paper, we start by considering some of the assumptions that those advancing translational approaches to bioethics make about bioethics and compare them to the reality of bioethics as an academic field. We move on to explain how those who make this case, implicitly or explicitly, for translational bioethics go awry because of (...)
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  44.  20
    Developing translational bioethics—Suggestions for ways forward.Lucy Frith - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):204-212.
    This paper will take as its starting point the premise that developing translational bioethics is a worthwhile endeavour. I will develop an account of translational bioethics and discuss what implications this would have for the wider discipline of bioethics and argue that this would be a useful development for bioethics. The paper will conduct a form of ‘translational meta‐bioethics analysis’, in the words of Bærøe. I will argue that if we are serious about instituting translational bioethics, then it will need (...)
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  45.  20
    Translating theories of justice into a practice model for triage of scarce intensive care resources during a pandemic.Kathrin Knochel, Eva-Maria Schmolke, Lukas Meier & Alena Buyx - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):223-232.
    During the COVID‐19 pandemic, national triage guidelines were developed to address the anticipated shortage of life‐saving resources, should ICU capacities be overloaded. Rationing and triage imply that in addition to individual patient interests, interests of population health have to be integrated. The transfer of theoretical and empirical knowledge into feasible and useful practice models and their implementation in clinical settings need to be improved. This paper analyzes how triage protocols could translate abstract theories of distributive justice into concrete material and (...)
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  46.  19
    From book to bedside? A critical perspective on the debate about “translational bioethics”.Alexander Kremling, Jan Schildmann & Marcel Mertz - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):177-186.
    The concept of “translational bioethics” has received considerable attention in recent years. Most publications draw an analogy to translational medicine and describe bioethical research that aims at implementing and evaluating ethical interventions. However, current accounts of translational bioethics are often rather vague and seem to differ with regard to conceptual and methodological assumptions. It is not clear and scarcely analyzed what exactly “translation” in the field of bioethics means, in particular regarding goals and processes so that it is justified to (...)
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  47.  27
    Translational bioethics as a two‐way street. Developing clinical ethics support instruments with and for healthcare practitioners.Suzanne Metselaar - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):233-240.
    This article discusses an approach to translational bioethics (TB) that is concerned with the adaptation—or ‘translation’—of concepts, theories and methods from bioethics to practical contexts, in order to support ‘non-bioethicists’, such as researchers and healthcare practitioners, in dealing with their ethical issues themselves. Specifically, it goes into the participatory development of clinical ethics support (CES) instruments that respond to the needs and wishes of healthcare practitioners and that are tailored to the specific care contexts in which they are to be (...)
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  48.  13
    Translational bioethics.Jordan A. Parsons, Pamela Cairns & Jonathan Ives - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):173-176.
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  49.  16
    Translational or translationable? A call for ethno‐immersion in (empirical) bioethics research.Jordan A. Parsons, Harleen Kaur Johal, Joshua Parker & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):252-261.
    The shift towards "empirical bioethics" was largely triggered by a recognition that stakeholders' views and experiences are vital in ethical analysis where one hopes to produce practicable recommendations. Such perspectives can provide a rich resource in bioethics scholarship, perhaps challenging the researcher's perspective. However, overreliance on a picture painted by a group of research participants—or on pre‐existing literature in that field—can lead to a biased view of a given context, as the subjectivity of data generated in these ways cannot (and (...)
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  50. Providing ethics advice in a pandemic, in theory and in practice: A taxonomy of ethics advice.James Wilson, Jack Hume, Cian O'Donovan & Melanie Smallman - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):213-222.
    The pandemic significantly raised the stakes for the translation of bioethics insights into policy. The novelty, range and sheer quantity of the ethical problems that needed to be addressed urgently within public policy were unprecedented and required high‐bandwidth two‐way transfer of insights between academic bioethics and policy. Countries such as the United Kingdom, which do not have a National Ethics Committee, faced particular challenges in how to facilitate this. This paper takes as a case study the brief career of the (...)
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  51.  21
    Medical ethics education as translational bioethics.Peter D. Young, Andrew N. Papanikitas & John Spicer - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):262-269.
    We suggest that in the particular context of medical education, ethics can be considered in a similar way to other kinds of knowledge that are categorised and shaped by academics in the context of wider society. Moreover, the study of medical ethics education is translational in a manner loosely analogous to the study of medical education as adjunct to translational medicine. Some have suggested there is merit in the idea that much as translational research attempts to connect the laboratory scientist's (...)
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  52.  21
    Workplace heating and gender discrimination.Andreas Albertsen & Viki M. L. Pedersen - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):107-113.
    Across Europe, countries are reducing CO2 emissions and energy demand by lowering the temperature in public office buildings. These measures affect men and women unequally because the latter prefer and, indeed, perform better under higher temperatures than the standard temperature. Lowering the temperature thus further increases an already existing inequality. We show that the philosophical literature on discrimination provides an interesting theoretical approach to understanding such measures. On prominent understandings of what discrimination is, the policy would be considered direct discrimination (...)
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    A theory of triage.Greg Bognar - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):95-106.
    This paper provides a general framework for conceptualizing triage for intensive care unit admissions in public health emergencies such as the COVID‐19 pandemic. It applies this framework to some of the guidelines issued during the pandemic and addresses some controversial issues, including the role of age, the use of lives or life years, and the relevance of quality of life considerations. The paper defends a view on which triage protocols for public health emergencies should aim to maximize the number of (...)
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  54.  21
    Therapeutic misunderstandings in modern research.Sarah Heynemann, Wendy Lipworth, Sue-Anne McLachlan, Jennifer Philip, Tom John & Ian Kerridge - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):138-152.
    Clinical trials play a crucial role in generating evidence about healthcare interventions and improving outcomes for current and future patients. For individual trial participants, however, there are inevitably trade‐offs involved in clinical trial participation, given that trials have traditionally been designed to benefit future patient populations rather than to offer personalised care. Failure to understand the distinction between research and clinical care and the likelihood of benefit from participation in clinical trials has been termed the ‘therapeutic misconception’. The evolution of (...)
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  55.  22
    How Moral Bioenhancement Affects Perceived Praiseworthiness.Simon Lucas, Thomas Douglas & Nadira S. Faber - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):129–137.
    Psychological literature indicates that actions performed with the assistance of cognition‐enhancing biomedical technologies are often deemed to be less praiseworthy than similar actions performed without such assistance. This study examines (i) whether this result extends to the bioenhancement of moral capacities, and (ii) if so, what explains the effect of moral bioenhancement on perceived praiseworthiness. The findings indicate that actions facilitated by morally bioenhanced individuals are considered less deserving of praise than similar actions facilitated by ‘traditional’ moral enhancement—for example, moral (...)
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  56.  8
    Building solidarity during COVID‐19 and HIV/AIDS.Michael Montess - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):121-128.
    While the WHO, public health experts, and political leaders have referenced solidarity as an important part of our responses to COVID‐19, I consider how we build solidarity during pandemics in order to improve the effectiveness of our responses. I use Prainsack and Buyx's definition of solidarity, which highlights three different tiers: (1) interpersonal solidarity, (2) group solidarity, and (3) institutional solidarity. Each tier of solidarity importantly depends on the actions and norms established at the lower tiers. Although empathy and solidarity (...)
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  57.  17
    Developing a living lab in ethics: Initial issues and observations.Eric Racine, Bénédicte D'Anjou, Clara Dallaire, Vincent Dumez, Caroline Favron-Godbout, Anne Hudon, Marjorie Montreuil, Catherine Olivier, Ariane Quintal & Vanessa Chenel - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):153-163.
    Living labs are interdisciplinary and participatory initiatives aimed at bringing research closer to practice by involving stakeholders in all stages of research. Living labs align with the principles of participatory research methods as well as recent insights about how participatory ways of generating knowledge help to change practices in concrete settings with respect to specific problems. The participatory, open, and discussion‐oriented nature of living labs could be ideally suited to accompany ethical reflection and changes ensuing from reflection. To our knowledge, (...)
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    Ethics of a pandemic of deliberate health misinformation: From abortion care to vaccines.Udo Schuklenk - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):93-94.
    <no abstract - brief excerpt> "...efforts at manipulating vulnerable populations into acting in particular ways that may not be in their best interest, has a history going back much longer. Arguably the internet turbocharged some of these efforts, but this has been happening for a long time.".
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  59.  32
    Conspiracy theories, clinical decision‐making, and need for bioethics debate: A response to Stout.Jukka Varelius - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):164-169.
    Although people who endorse conspiracy theories related to medicine often have negative attitudes toward particular health care measures and may even shun the healthcare system in general, conspiracy theories have received rather meager attention in bioethics literature. Consequently, and given that conspiracy theorizing appears rather prevalent, it has been maintained that there is significant need for bioethics debate over how to deal with conspiracy theories. While the proposals have typically focused on the effects that unwarranted conspiracy theories have in the (...)
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    Anti‐natalism is incompatible with Theory X.Fumitake Yoshizawa - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):114-120.
    The anti‐natalist philosopher David Benatar defends a position asserting that all life is harmful, and that it is, therefore, wrong to have children. In this paper, I critique Benatar's less‐discussed claim that his anti‐natalism provides solutions to population ethics problems, such as the Non‐Identity Problem, the Repugnant Conclusion, and the Mere Addition Problem, all of which are presented in Derek Parfit's Reasons and Persons. Since the publication of his Better Never to Have Been, Benatar has continued to claim that its (...)
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