70 found

Year:

  1.  4
    Financing Uterus Transplants: The United States Context.Valarie K. Blake - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):527-533.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  3
    Positioning Uterus Transplantation as a ‘More Ethical’ Alternative to Surrogacy: Exploring Symmetries Between Uterus Transplantation and Surrogacy Through Analysis of a Swedish Government White Paper.Lisa Guntram & Nicola Jane Williams - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):509-518.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  3
    Uterus Transplantation as Radical Reproduction: Taking the Adoption Alternative More Seriously.Mianna Lotz - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):499-508.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Uterus Transplants and the Insufficient Value of Gestation.Emily McTernan - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):481-488.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    Pushing the Boundaries: Uterine Transplantation and the Limits of Reproductive Autonomy.Laura O’Donovan - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):489-498.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    The Importance of Being Pregnant: On the Healthcare Need for Uterus Transplantation.Lars Sandman - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):519-526.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    The Ethics of Uterus Transplantation.Nicola Jane Williams, Rosamund Scott & Stephen Wilkinson - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (8):478-480.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    The Ethics of Ordinary and Exact Justification in Blood Donation Deferral Categories for Men Who Have Sex with Men.Kurt M. Blankschaen - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):445-453.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  3
    Mandatory Sex Selection and Mitochondrial Transfer.Reuven Brandt - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):437-444.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  6
    When is Coercive Methadone Therapy Justified?Daniel D'Hotman, Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):405-413.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  2
    Empathy is a Poor Foundation on Which to Base Legislative Medical Policy.Mark A. Graber & John W. Ely - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):402-404.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    Self‐Ownership, Relational Dignity, and Organ Sales.David Hershenov - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):430-436.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  9
    Return to Childhood? Against the Infantilization of People with Dementia.Karin Jongsma & Mark Schweda - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):414-420.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  2
    Trust and Responsibility in Molecular Tumour Boards.David Merry, Christoph Schickhardt, Katja Mehlis & Eva C. Winkler - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):464-472.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Community Engagement in Global Health Research That Advances Health Equity.Bridget Pratt & Jantina de Vries - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):454-463.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  9
    Conscientious Objection and Compromising the Patient: Response to Hughes.Julian Savulescu & Udo Schuklenk - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):473-476.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Should Consent Be Required for Organ Procurement?Alexander Zambrano - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):421-429.
    Must we obtain a patient’s consent before posthumously removing her organs? According to the consent requirement, in order to permissibly remove organs from a deceased person, it is necessary that her prior consent be obtained. If the consent requirement is true, then this seems to rule out policies that do not seek and obtain a patient’s prior consent to organ donation, while at the same time vindicating policies that do seek and obtain patient consent. In this paper, however, I argue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Hit but Not Down. The Substance View in Light of the Criticism of Lovering and Simkulet.Henrik Friberg-Fernros - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):388-394.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    Companions or Patients? The Impact of Family Presence in Genetic Consultations for Inherited Breast Cancer: Relational Autonomy in Practice.Roy Gilbar & Sivia Barnoy - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):378-387.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Discussing Rights and Wrongs: Three Suggestions for Moving Forward with the Migrant Health Rights Debate.Nora Gottlieb & Yitzchak Ben Mocha - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):353-359.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Migration, Health, and Ethics.Corinna Klingler, Dennis Odukoya & Katja Kuehlmeyer - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):330-333.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  6
    Language Barriers and Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare Settings.Yael Peled - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):360-367.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Clinical Research Involving Pregnant Women. F. Baylis A. Ballantyne Springer, Research Ethics Forum 3, 2016. 301 Pp. US$ 149.00 E-Book, US$ 199.00 Hb. ISBN 978‐3‐319‐26510‐0, $189. [REVIEW]Laura Purdy - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):398-399.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. A Rights‐Based Proposal for Managing Faith‐Based Values and Expectations of Migrants at End‐of‐Life Illustrated by an Empirical Study Involving South Asians in the UK.Jo Samanta, Ash Samanta & Omar Madhloom - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):368-377.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    Health Worker Migration and Migrant Healthcare: Seeking Cosmopolitanism in the NHS.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):334-342.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. From Self‐Interest to Solidarity: One Path Towards Delivering Refugee Health.Peter G. N. West-Oram - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (6):343-352.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  13
    Framing the Ethical and Legal Issues of Human Artificial Gametes in Research, Therapy, and Assisted Reproduction: A German Perspective.Barbara Advena‐Regnery, Hans‐Georg Dederer, Franziska Enghofer, Tobias Cantz & Thomas Heinemann - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):314-326.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  1
    Conscience Claims, Metaphysics, and Avoiding an LGBT Eugenic.Abram Brummett - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):272-280.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  6
    Educational Pelvic Exams on Anesthetized Women: Why Consent Matters.Phoebe Friesen - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):298-307.
    It is argued here that the practice of medical students performing pelvic exams on women who are under anesthetic and have not consented is immoral and indefensible. This argument begins by laying out the ethical justification for the practice of informed consent, which can be found in autonomy and basic rights. Foregoing the process of consent within medicine can result in violations of both autonomy and basic rights, as well as trust, forming the basis of the wrong of unauthorized pelvic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  7
    Regret, Shame, and Denials of Women's Voluntary Sterilization.Dianne Lalonde - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):281-288.
    Women face extraordinary difficulty in seeking sterilization as physicians routinely deny them the procedure. Physicians defend such denials by citing the possibility of future regret, a well‐studied phenomenon in women’s sterilization literature. Regret is, however, a problematic emotion upon which to deny reproductive freedom as regret is neither satisfactorily defined and measured, nor is it centered in analogous cases regarding men’s decision to undergo sterilization or the decision of women to undergo fertility treatment. Why then is regret such a concern (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  4
    Physician‐Assisted Death: What Everyone Needs to Know. L. W. Sumner, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, 2017. Xv + 243 Pp. US$ 16.95 Pbk, ISBN 978‐0‐19‐049017‐1. US$ 74.00 Hbk. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐049018‐8. [REVIEW]Paul T. Menzel - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):327-328.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  49
    Will Cognitive Enhancement Create Post‐Persons? The Use(Lesness) of Induction in Determining the Likelihood of Moral Status Enhancement.Emilian Mihailov & Alexandru Dragomir - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):308-313.
    The prospect of cognitive enhancement well beyond current human capacities raises worries that the fundamental equality in moral status of human beings could be undermined. Cognitive enhancement might create beings with moral status higher than persons. Yet, there is an expressibility problem of spelling out what the higher threshold in cognitive capacity would be like. Nicholas Agar has put forward the bold claim that we can show by means of inductive reasoning that indefinite cognitive enhancement will probably mark a difference (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  3
    Empathy, Social Media, and Directed Altruistic Living Organ Donation.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):289-297.
    In this article we explore some of the ethical dimensions of using social media to increase the number of living kidney donors. Social media provides a platform for changing non-identifiable ‘statistical victims’ into ‘real people’ with whom we can identify and feel empathy: the so-called ‘identifiable victim effect’, which prompts charitable action. We examine three approaches to promoting kidney donation using social media which could take advantages of the identifiable victim effect: institutionally organized campaigns based on historical cases aimed at (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  16
    Bioethics Culture Wars – 2018 Edition: Alfie Evans.Udo Schuklenk - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):270-271.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  5
    The Canary in the Coal Mine: Continence Care for People with Dementia in Acute Hospital Wards as a Crisis of Dehumanization.Paula Boddington & Katie Featherstone - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (4):251-260.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  7
    Are Older People a Vulnerable Group? Philosophical and Bioethical Perspectives on Ageing and Vulnerability.Claudia Bozzaro, Joachim Boldt & Mark Schweda - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (4):233-239.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  6
    Toward a Global Geroethics - Gerontology and the Theory of the Good Human Life.Hans‐Joerg Ehni, Selma Kadi, Maartje Schermer & Sridhar Venkatapuram - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (4):261-268.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  5
    Responsibility and Age‐Related Dementia.Petr Frantik - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (4):240-250.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  8
    The Ethics of Ageing.John‐Stewart Gordon - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (4):222-222.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  9
    Indignity and Old Age.John‐Stewart Gordon - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (4):223-232.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  6
    Reproductive Cloning Revisited.Ruth Chadwick - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):146-146.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  10
    Fragile Lives with Fragile Rights: Justice for Babies Born at the Limit of Viability.Manya J. Hendriks & John D. Lantos - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):205-214.
    There is an inconsistency in the ways that doctors make clinical decisions regarding the treatment of babies born extremely prematurely. Many experts now recommend that clinical decisions about the treatment of such babies be individualized and consider many different factors. Nevertheless, many policies and practices throughout Europe and North America still appear to base decisions on gestational age alone or on gestational age as the primary factor that determines whether doctors recommend or even offer life-sustaining neonatal intensive care treatment. These (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  18
    Manipulation, Salience, and Nudges.Robert Noggle - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):164-170.
    Cass Sunstein and Richard Thaler recommend helping people make better decisions by employing ‘nudges’, which they define as noncoercive methods of influencing choice for the better. Not surprisingly, healthcare practitioners and public policy professionals have become interested in whether nudges might be a promising method of improving health-related behaviors without resorting to heavy-handed methods such as coercion, deception, or government regulation. Many nudges seem unobjectionable as they merely improve the quality and quantity available for the decision-maker. However, other nudges influence (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  4
    Melanoma in the Shopping Mall: A Utilitarian Argument for Offering Unsolicited Medical Opinions in Informal Settings.Gustav Preller & Sabine Salloch - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):193-198.
    Doctors occasionally make diagnoses in strangers outside of formal medical settings by using the medical skill of visual inspection, such as noticing signs of melanoma or the symptoms of hyperthyroidism. This may cause considerable moral unease and doubts on the side of the diagnosing physician. Such encounters force physicians to consider whether or not to intervene by introducing themselves to the stranger and offering an unsolicited medical opinion despite the absence of a formal doctor-patient relationship. A small body of literature (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  11
    Relational Autonomy, Care, and Jehovah's Witnesses in Germany.Małgorzata Rajtar - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):184-192.
    Drawing from an ethics of care, relational approaches to autonomy have recently emerged in bioethics. Unlike individual autonomy with its emphasis on patients’ rights, choice, and self-determination which has been the hallmark of bioethics consistent with the ideology of individualism in neoliberal democracies in Western countries, relational autonomy highlights the relatedness, interdependency, and social embeddedness of patients. By examining the mediating role that male Hospital Liaison Committee members in Germany play in facilitating care that supports Jehovah's Witnesses’ refusal of blood (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  21
    The Future‐Like‐Ours Argument, Animalism, and Mereological Universalism.Andrea Sauchelli - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):199-204.
    Which metaphysical theories are involved—whether presupposed or implied—in Marquis’ future-like-ours argument against abortion? Vogelstein has recently argued that the supporter of the FLO argument faces a problematic dilemma; in particular, Marquis, the main supporter of the argument, seems to have to either abandon diachronic universalism or acquiesce and declare that contraception is morally wrong. I argue that the premises of Marquis’ argument can be reasonably combined with a form of unrestricted composition and that the FLO argument is better viewed as (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  23
    Influencing Relatives to Respect Donor Autonomy: Should We Nudge Families to Consent to Organ Donation?Adnan Sharif & Greg Moorlock - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):155-163.
    Refusing consent to organ donation remains unacceptably high, and improving consent rates from family or next-of-kin is an important step to procuring more organs for solid organ transplantation in countries where this approval is sought. We have thus far failed to translate fully our limited understanding of why families refuse permission into successful strategies targeting consent in the setting of deceased organ donation, primarily because our interventions fail to target underlying cognitive obstacles. Novel interventions to overcome these hurdles, incorporating an (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  13
    Effective Altruists Ought to Be Allowed to Sell Their Kidneys.Ryan Tonkens - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):147-154.
    Effective altruists aim to do the most good that they can do with the resources available to them, without causing themselves or their dependents significant harm thereby. The argument presented in this paper demonstrates that there are no morally relevant dissimilarities between living kidney donation and living kidney selling for effective altruistic reasons. Thus, since the former is allowed, the latter ought to be allowed as well. And, there are important moral differences between living kidney selling for effective altruistic reasons (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  4
    Fostering Caring Relationships: Suggestions to Rethink Liberal Perspectives on the Ethics of Newborn Screening.Simone van der Burg & Anke Oerlemans - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):171-183.
    Newborn screening involves the collection of blood from the heel of a newborn baby and testing it for a list of rare and inheritable disorders. New biochemical screening technologies led to expansions of NBS programs in the first decade of the 21st century. It is expected that they will in time be replaced by genetic sequencing technologies. These developments have raised a lot of ethical debate. We reviewed the ethical literature on NBS, analyzed the issues and values that emerged, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  7
    Judgments of Moral Responsibility in Tissue Donation Cases.John Beverley & James Beebe - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):83-93.
    If a person requires an organ or tissue donation to survive, many philosophers argue that whatever moral responsibility a biological relative may have to donate to the person in need will be grounded at least partially, if not entirely, in biological relations the potential donor bears to the recipient. We contend that such views ignore the role that a potential donor's unique ability to help the person in need plays in underwriting such judgments. If, for example, a sperm donor is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  51.  34
    The Epistemic Costs of Compromise in Bioethics.Katrien Devolder & Thomas Douglas - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):111-118.
    Bioethicists sometimes defend compromise positions, particularly when they enter debates on applied topics that have traditionally been highly polarised, such as those regarding abortion, euthanasia and embryonic stem cell research. However, defending compromise positions is often regarded with a degree of disdain. Many are intuitively attracted to the view that it is almost always problematic to defend compromise positions, in the sense that we have a significant moral reason not to do so. In this paper, we consider whether this common (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  52.  9
    Enthusiastic Portrayal of 3D Bioprinting in the Media: Ethical Side Effects.Frederic Gilbert, John Noel M. Viaña, Cathal D. O'Connell & Susan Dodds - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):94-102.
    There has been a surge in mass media reports extolling the potential for using three-dimensional printing of biomaterials to treat a wide range of clinical conditions. Given that mass media is recognized as one of the most important sources of health and medical information for the general public, especially prospective patients, we report and discuss the ethical consequences of coverage of 3D bioprinting in the media. First, we illustrate how positive mass media narratives of a similar biofabricated technology, namely the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  53.  24
    From Applied Ethics to Empirical Ethics to Contextual Ethics.Barry Hoffmaster - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):119-125.
    Bioethics became applied ethics when it was assimilated to moral philosophy. Because deduction is the rationality of moral philosophy, subsuming facts under moral principles to deduce conclusions about what ought to be done became the prescribed reasoning of bioethics, and bioethics became a theory comprised of moral principles. Bioethicists now realize that applied ethics is too abstract and spare to apprehend the specificity, particularity, complexity and contingency of real moral issues. Empirical ethics and contextual ethics are needed to incorporate these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  54.  10
    Conscientious Objection, Professional Duty and Compromise: A Response to Savulescu and Schuklenk.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):126-131.
    In a recent article in this journal, Savulescu and Schuklenk defend and extend their earlier arguments against a right to medical conscientious objection in response to criticisms raised by Cowley. I argue that while it would be preferable to be less accommodating of medical conscientious than many countries currently are, Savulescu and Schuklenk's argument that conscientious objection is ‘simply unprofessional’ is mistaken. The professional duties of doctors should be defined in relation to the interests of patients and society, and for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  55.  18
    A Dubious Defense of ‘After‐Birth Abortion’: A Reply to Räsänen.Christopher Kaczor - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):132-137.
    Scholars have offered various critiques of Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva's controversial article, ‘After-birth abortion: Why should the baby live?’ My book The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice presents four such critiques. First, Giubilini and Minerva argue from the deeply controversial to the even more controversial. Second, they presuppose a false view of personal identity called body-self dualism. Third, their view cannot secure human equality. And fourth, their account of harm cannot account for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  56.  19
    Queer Reproduction Revisited and Why Race, Class and Citizenship Still Matters: A Response to Cristina Richie.Doris Leibetseder - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):138-144.
    In the dialogue between Timothy F. Murphy and Cristina Richie about queer bioethics and queer reproduction in this journal, significant points of the emergent and extremely important discussions on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer bioethics are raised. Richie specifies correctly that queer bioethics can either complement or contradict LGBT bioethics and the queer standpoint against heteroconformity and heterofuturity is decisive here. As the field of queer bioethics is such a recent and essential part of consideration for bioethics and as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  57.  4
    Different Games of Moral Bioenhancement.Vojin Rakić & Harris Wiseman - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):103-110.
    Rakić has serious misgivings about Wiseman's inability to frame ethical issues in the context of transcending existing realities with the aim of achieving what we believe is morally right. This inability to think beyond the present is misguided in ethics. He also criticizes Wiseman for making the unimaginative and unsubstantiated assumption that moral bioenhancement technologies have reached their zenith already. Rakić argues that MBE will become more effective in the time to come, that it ought to be optional for every (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  58.  5
    The Trouble with Public Health: HIV/AIDS in Canada as a Case in Point.Udo Schuklenk - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):82-82.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  59.  11
    Does Benefit Justify Research with Children?Ariella Binik - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):27-35.
    The inclusion of children in research gives rise to a difficult ethical question: What justifies children's research participation and exposure to research risks when they cannot provide informed consent? This question arises out of the tension between the moral requirement to obtain a subject's informed consent for research participation, on the one hand, and the limited capacity of most children to provide informed consent, on the other. Most agree that children's participation in clinical research can be justified. But the ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  60.  10
    Reproductive Autonomy and Responsibility: Current Trends.Ruth Chadwick - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):2-2.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  61.  4
    Shame and HIV: Strategies for Addressing the Negative Impact Shame has on Public Health and Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV.Phil Hutchinson & Rageshri Dhairyawan - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):68-76.
    There are five ways in which shame might negatively impact upon our attempts to combat and treat HIV. Shame can prevent an individual from disclosing all the relevant facts about their sexual history to the clinician. Shame can be a motivational factor in people living with HIV not engaging with or being retained in care. Shame can prevent individuals from presenting at clinics for STI and HIV testing. Shame can prevent an individual from disclosing their HIV status to new sexual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  62.  6
    Reconsidering Paternalism in Clinical Research.Lynn A. Jansen & Steven Wall - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):50-58.
    The ethical standards that regulate clinical research have multiple rationales. Among them is the need to protect potential subjects from making imprudent decisions, which extends beyond the soft paternalistic concern to protect people from making uninformed decisions to participate in trials. This article argues that a plausible risk/benefit restriction on clinical trials is presumptively justified by hard paternalism, which in turn is supported by a deeper fairness-based rationale. This presumptive case for hard paternalism in research is not defeated by the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  63.  7
    Who Gets the Gametes? An Argument for a Points System for Fertility Patients.Simon Jenkins, Jonathan Ives, Sue Avery & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):16-26.
    This paper argues that the convention of allocating donated gametes on a ‘first come, first served’ basis should be replaced with an allocation system that takes into account more morally relevant criteria than waiting time. This conclusion was developed using an empirical bioethics methodology, which involved a study of the views of 18 staff members from seven U.K. fertility clinics, and 20 academics, policy-makers, representatives of patient groups, and other relevant professionals, on the allocation of donated sperm and eggs. Against (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  64.  3
    Medical Innovation in a Children's Hospital: ‘Diseases Desperate Grown by Desperate Appliance Are Relieved, or Not at All’.Vic Larcher, Helen Turnham & Joe Brierley - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):36-42.
    A balance needs to be struck between facilitating compassionate access to innovative treatments for those in desperate need, and the duty to protect such vulnerable individuals from the harms of untested/unlicensed treatments. We introduced a principle-based framework to evaluate such requests and describe its application in the context of recently evolved UK, US and European regulatory processes. 24 referrals were received by our quaternary children's hospital Clinical Ethics Committee over the 5-year period. The CEC-rapid response group evaluated individual cases within (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  65.  8
    The Ethics of Public Policy RCTs: The Principle of Policy Equipoise.Douglas MacKay - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):59-67.
    In this article, I ask whether a principle analogous to the principle of clinical equipoise should govern the design and conduct of RCTs evaluating the effectiveness of policy interventions. I answer this question affirmatively, and introduce and defend the principle of policy equipoise. According to this principle, all arms of a policy RCT must be, at minimum, in a state of equipoise with the best proven policy that is also morally and practically attainable and sustainable. For all arms of a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  66.  6
    Bioethics, Children, and the Environment.Timothy F. Murphy - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):3-9.
    Queer perspectives have typically emerged from sexual minorities as a way of repudiating flawed views of sexuality, mischaracterized relationships, and objectionable social treatment of people with atypical sexuality or gender expression. In this vein, one commentator offers a queer critique of the conceptualization of children in regard to their value for people's identities and relationships. According to this account, children are morally problematic given the values that make them desirable, their displacement of other beings and things entitled to moral protection, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  67.  18
    Autism, Theory of Mind, and the Reactive Attitudes.Kenneth A. Richman & Raya Bidshahri - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):43-49.
    Whether to treat autism as exculpatory in any given circumstance appears to be influenced both by models of autism and by theories of moral responsibility. This article looks at one particular combination of theories: autism as theory of mind challenges and moral responsibility as requiring appropriate experience of the reactive attitudes. In pursuing this particular combination of ideas, we do not intend to endorse them. Our goal is, instead, to explore the implications of this combination of especially prominent ideas about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  68.  9
    The Parenthood Argument.William Simkulet - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):10-15.
    Don Marquis is well known for his future like ours theory, according to which the killing beings like us is seriously morally wrong because it deprives us of a future we can value. According to Marquis, human fetuses possess a future they can come to value, and thus according to FLO have a right to life. Recently Mark Brown has argued that even if FLO shows fetuses have a right to life, it fails to show that fetuses have a right (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  69.  3
    Response to Vogelstein: How the 2012 AAP Task Force on Circumcision Went Wrong.Robert S. Van Howe - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):77-80.
    Vogelstein cautions medical organizations against jumping into the fray of controversial issues, yet proffers the 2012 American Academy of Pediatrics' Task Force policy position on infant male circumcision as ‘an appropriate use of position-statements.’ Only a scratch below the surface of this policy statement uncovers the Task Force's failure to consider Vogelstein's many caveats. The Task Force supported the cultural practice by putting undeserved emphasis on questionable scientific data, while ignoring or underplaying the importance of valid contrary scientific data. Without (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  70.  31
    There is No Right to the Death of the Fetus.Perry Hendricks - 2018 - Bioethics (6):1-3.
    Joona Räsänen, in his article ‘Ectogenesis, abortion and a right to the death of the fetus’, has argued for the view that parents have a right to the death of the fetus. In this article, I will explicate the three arguments Räsänen defends, and show that two of them have false or unmotivated premises and hence fail, and that the support he offers for his third argument is inconsistent with other views he expresses in his article. Therefore, I conclude that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues