7 found

Year:

  1.  13
    Not Music, but Musics: A Case for Conceptual Pluralism in Aesthetics.Adrian Currie & Anton Killin - 2017 - Estetika 54 (2):151-174.
    We argue for conceptual pluralism about music. In our view, there is no right answer to the question ‘What is music?’ divorced from some context or interest. Instead, there are several, non-equivalent music concepts suited to different interests – from within some tradition or practice, or by way of some research question or field of inquiry. We argue that unitary definitions of music are problematic, that the role music concepts play in various research questions should motivate conceptual pluralism about music, (...)
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  2.  96
    A Post-Culturalist Aesthetics? A Commentary on Davis's 'Visuality and Vision'.Jakub Stejskal - 2017 - Estetika 54 (2):267-276.
    A commentary on Whitney Davis's essay 'Visuality and Vision: Questions for a Post-culturalist Art History' published in the same issue of Estetika.
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  3. Aesthetic Supererogation.Alfred Archer & Lauren Ware - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):102-116.
    Many aestheticians and ethicists are interested in the similarities and connections between aesthetics and ethics (Nussbaum 1990; Foot 2002; Gaut 2007). One way in which some have suggested the two domains are different is that in ethics there exist obligations while in aesthetics there do not (Hampshire 1954). However, Marcia Muelder Eaton has argued that there is good reason to think that aesthetic obligations do exist (Eaton 2008). We will explore the nature of these obligations by asking whether acts of (...)
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  4.  18
    Obligations to Artworks as Duties of Love.Anthony Cross - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):85-101.
    It is uncontroversial that our engagement with artworks is constrained by obligations; most commonly, these consist in obligations to other persons, such as artists, audiences, and owners of artworks. A more controversial claim is that we have genuine obligations to artworks themselves. I defend a qualified version of this claim. However, I argue that such obligations do not derive from the supposed moral rights of artworks – for no such rights exist. Rather, I argue that these obligations are instances of (...)
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  5.  14
    Editorial - Aesthetic Reasons and Aesthetic Obligations.Fabian Dorsch - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):3-19.
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  6.  10
    Rafe McGregor, The Value of Literature.M. W. Rowe - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):127-137.
    A review of Rafe McGregor´s The Value of Literature.
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  7.  5
    Derek Attridge, The Work of Literature.Iris Vidmar - 2017 - Estetika 54 (1):138-145.
    A review of Derek Attridge´s The Work of Literature.
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