Year:

  1. A Kantian Interpretation of Niels Bohr's Early Correspondence Principle: 1917-1924.Roberto Angeloni - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):8-24.
    In the present paper I aim to discuss the philosophical foundations of the early correspondence principle, by comparing the conceptual structure underlying the first correspondence principle with the procedure of analogy that Immanuel Kant introduced in the Critique of Judgment from 1790. On such a comparison, I will seek to demonstrate the consistency of the conceptual ratio according to which the correspondence principle is to the classical "concepts" of space and time, as these a priori forms of intuition, in Kant, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Ontology of Electromagnetism.Lars-Göran Johansson - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):25-44.
    Electromagnetism is usually understood as a theory describing how charged particles and eletromagnetic fields interact. In this paper I argue that a double ontology comprising both particles and fields is problematic. Either we should think of electromagnetism as a theory about charged particles directly interacting with each other, or as theory of fields whose local interactions are manifested as field quanta, called "particles." From a purely theoretical point of view the choice between a particle and a field interpretation does not (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Weyl's Conception of the Continuum in a Husserlian Transcendental Perspective.Stathis Livadas - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):99-124.
    This article attempts to broaden the phenomenologically motivated perspective of H. Weyl's Das Kontinuum in the hope of elucidating the differences between the intuitive and mathematical continuum and further providing a deeper phenomenological interpretation. It is known that Weyl sought to develop an arithmetically based theory of continuum with the reasoning that one should be based on the naturally accessible domain of natural numbers and on the classical first-order predicate calculus to found a theory of mathematical continuum free of impredicative (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Metaphysics: Inside or Outside of Science?Peeter Müürsepp - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):45-61.
    For decades, the British philosopher of science Nicholas Maxwell has been promoting a new approach to science called aim-oriented empiricism. Maxwell's basic claim is that the regular way of doing science, called standard empiricism, is untenable because it does not account for the basic general assumptions that scientists actually adhere to without acknowledgment. Standard empiricism is unable to make sense of the progress of science as it is happening. The alternative approach that Maxwell advocates, aim-oriented empiricism, acknowledges some basic metaphysical (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  5
    The Dilemma Imposed on the Realist by Putnam's and Kripkensteinian Argument.Henrik Sova - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):62-82.
    In this article, I have two aims. Firstly, I argue that Hilary Putnam's model theoretic indeterminacy argument against external realism and Saul Kripke's so-called Kripkensteinian argument against semantic realism have the same dialectical structure and the same conclusion---both force the opponent to face the same dilemma. Namely: either adopt meaning minimalism or postulate unobservable semantic facts. Secondly, I analyze more closely the first horn of the dilemma---meaning minimalism. This is the position according to which there are no truth conditions for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Helmholtz, Du Bois-Reymond, and the Transcendent Difficulty of Explaining the Relation Between Sensations and the Physical World.Andrea Togni - 2017 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 10 (1):83-98.
    According to Hermann von Helmholtz, sensations are signs that external causes impress on our sense organs; those signs are then used by the mind to acquire knowledge of the reality. Helmholtz's work points out the difficulty of defining a notion of causality suitable for explaining the relation between sensations on the one hand and the physical world on the other. In fact, he states that: 1) Physical stimuli, understood as the causal origins of sensations, are unknowable in themselves; 2) There (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues