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  1.  3
    Mark Solovey, Social Science for What? Battles Over Public Funding for the ‘Other Sciences’ at the National Science Foundation Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2020. Pp. 398. ISBN: 978-0-2625-3905-0. $50.00. [REVIEW]Katherine Ambler - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):113-114.
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  2.  1
    Paola Bertucci, Artisanal Enlightenment: Science and the Mechanical Arts in Old Regime France New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2017. Pp. 312. ISBN 978-0-3002-2741-3. $40.00. [REVIEW]Jens Amborg - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):130-131.
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  3.  1
    Tom Williamson, Humphry Repton: Landscape Design in an Age of Revolution London: Reaktion Books, 2020. Pp. 312. ISBN 978-1-7891-4299-0. £35.00. [REVIEW]H. -F. Dessain - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):115-116.
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  4.  1
    Audra Wolfe, Freedom's Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018. Pp. X + 302. ISBN 978-1-4214-2673-0. $29.95 (Hardback). ISBN 978-1-4214-3908-2. $19.95. [REVIEW]Vedran Duančić - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):120-122.
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  5.  2
    Vaughn Scribner, Merpeople: A Human History London: Reaktion Books, 2020. Pp. 320. ISBN: 978-1-7891-4314-0. £20.00.Stephanie Eichberg - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):122-124.
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  6.  2
    Pratik Chakrabarti, Inscriptions of Nature: Geology and the Naturalization of Antiquity Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020. Pp. 280. ISBN: 987-1-4214-3874-0. $54.95. [REVIEW]Gianamar Giovannetti-Singh - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):118-120.
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  7.  3
    DNA Translated: Friedrich Miescher's Discovery of Nuclein in its Original Context.Kersten Hall & Neeraja Sankaran - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):99-107.
    In 1871, the Swiss physiological chemist Friedrich Miescher published the results of a detailed chemical analysis of pus cells, in which he showed that the nuclei of these cells contained a hitherto unknown phosphorus-rich chemical which he named ‘nuclein’ for its specific localisation. Published in German, ‘Ueber Die Chemische Zusammensetzung Der Eiterzellen’, [On the Chemical Composition of Pus Cells] Medicinisch-Chemische Untersuchungen 4: 441–60, was the first publication to describe DNA, and yet remains relatively obscure. We therefore undertook a translation of (...)
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  8.  1
    Antony Adler, Neptune's Laboratory: Fantasy, Fear, and Science at Sea Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2019. Pp. 256. ISBN: 978-0-6749-7201-8. £31.95. [REVIEW]Penelope K. Hardy - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):111-113.
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  9.  2
    Ido Hartogsohn, The American Trip: Set, Setting, and the Psychedelic Experience in the Twentieth Century Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2020. Pp. 432. ISBN: 978-0-2625-3914-2. $35.00. [REVIEW]Andrew Jones - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):109-111.
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  10.  5
    Robert M. Young's Mind, Brain and Adaptation Revisited.Christopher Lawrence - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):61-77.
    Robert Maxwell Young's first book Mind, Brain and Adaptation in the Nineteenth Century, written from 1960 to 1965, still merits reading as a study of the naturalization of mind and its relation to social thought in Victorian Britain. I examine the book from two perspectives that give the volume its unique character: first, Young's interest in psychology, which he considered should be used to inform humane professional practices and be the basis of social reform; second, new approaches to the history (...)
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  11.  1
    Emma Griffin, Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020. Pp. 320. ISBN 978-0-3002-3006-2. £20.00. [REVIEW]Lindsay Middleton - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):117-118.
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  12.  3
    Out on the Fringe: Wales and the History of Science.Iwan Rhys Morus - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):87-97.
    Imagine a scene sometime in the 1750s in the depths of west Wales. This was wild country. Even a century later, George Borrow called it a ‘mountainous wilderness … a waste of russet-coloured hills, with here and there a black craggy summit’. Through this desolation rides the Reverend William Williams. As he rode, he read – and the book in his saddlebags on this occasion was William Derham's Astro-Theology, first published some twenty years earlier. Williams was a leading figure in (...)
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  13.  1
    Maria M. Portuondo, The Spanish Disquiet: The Biblical Natural Philosophy of Benito Arias Montano Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2019. Pp. Xvi + 446. ISBN 978-0-2265-9226-8. $65.00. [REVIEW]Noah Moxham - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):126-128.
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  14.  5
    Revolutions in the Head: Darwin, Malthus and Robert M. Young.James A. Secord - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):41-59.
    The late 1960s witnessed a key conjunction between political activism and the history of science. Science, whether seen as a touchstone of rationality or of oppression, was fundamental to all sides in the era of the Vietnam War. This essay examines the historian Robert Maxwell Young's turn to Marxism and radical politics during this period, especially his widely cited account of the ‘common context’ of nineteenth-century biological and social theorizing, which demonstrated the centrality of Thomas Robert Malthus's writings on population (...)
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  15.  1
    Alexander Jones and Liba Taub (Eds.), The Cambridge History of Science, Vol. 1, Ancient Science Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Pp. Xix + 642. ISBN 978-0-511-98014-5. £120.00. [REVIEW]Michalis Sialaros - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):124-125.
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  16.  1
    Maurice Pierre Crosland (1931–2020): An Appreciation.Crosbie Smith - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):79-85.
    Following some years of declining health, Professor Maurice Crosland passed away on 30 August 2020 at the age of eighty-nine. Author of four influential scholarly monographs, Maurice played major roles in the British Society for the History of Science during the 1960s and 1970s as an active Member of Council, Honorary Editor of the British Journal for the History of Science and Honorary President of the society. His academic career began in 1963 with his appointment to a lectureship in the (...)
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  17.  1
    Elizabeth A. Williams, Appetite and Its Discontents: Science, Medicine and the Urge to Eat, 1750–1950 Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2020. Pp. 416. ISBN 978-0-2266-9304-0. $35.00. [REVIEW]David F. Smith - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):128-129.
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  18.  3
    Ambition, ‘Failure’ and the Laboratory: Birmingham as a Centre of Twentieth-Century British Scientific Psychiatry.Rebecca Wynter - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):19-40.
    This article will reveal how local scientific determination and ambition, in the face of rejection by funders, navigated a path to success and to influence in national policy and international medicine. It will demonstrate that Birmingham, England's ‘second city’, was the key centre for cutting-edge biological psychiatry in Britain in the 1920s and 1930s. The ambitions of Frederick Mott – doyen of biochemistry, neuropathology and neuropsychiatry, until now celebrated as a London figure – to revolutionize psychiatric treatment through science, chimed (...)
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  19.  3
    Unfriendly Guardians: India's First Nuclear Leadership Change in 1966.Ji Yeon-Jung - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Science 54 (1):1-17.
    This article, which focuses on the political decision making around the leadership of India's Atomic Energy Commission, shows how this process both decentralized scientific authority in India and led to changes in India's nuclear programme. New evidence presented from the deliberations of the Prime Minister's Secretariat shows that Vikram Sarabhai, appointed chairman of the AEC in 1966, following the sudden death of the previous leader, Homi Bhabha, was the favoured candidate from the start of the process. His view on India's (...)
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