Environmental Values

ISSN: 0963-2719

26 found

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  1.  18
    Book Review: Ecological Justice and the Extinction Crisis: Giving Living Beings their Due. [REVIEW]Jeremy Bendik-Keymer - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):350-352.
  2.  10
    Michael Hammond: An appreciation.Alan Holland - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):257-257.
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  3.  16
    Book Review: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology. [REVIEW]Magdalena Hoły-Łuczaj - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):352-354.
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  4.  27
    Rarity and endangerment: Why do they matter?Simon P. James - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):296-310.
    It is often supposed that valuable organisms are more valuable if they are rare. Likewise if they belong to endangered species. I consider what kinds of value rarity and endangerment can add in such cases. I argue that individual organisms of a valuable species typically have instrumental value as means to the end of preserving their species. This progenitive value, I suggest, tends to increase exponentially with rarity. Endlings, for their part, typically have little progenitive value; however, I argue that (...)
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  5.  29
    Normative implications of ecophenomenology. Towards a deep anthropo-related environmental ethics.Kira Meyer - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):279-295.
    Corporeality of human beings should be taken seriously and be included in their self-understanding as the ‘nature we are ourselves’. Such an ecophenomenological account has important normative implications. Firstly, I argue that the instrumental value of nature can be particularly well justified based on an ecophenomenological approach. Secondly, sentience is inseparable from corporeality. Therefore, insofar as it is a concern of the ecophenomenological approach to take corporeality and its implications seriously, sentient beings deserve direct moral consideration. Thirdly, it can strengthen (...)
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  6.  16
    Mud, metaphors and politics: Meaning-making during the 2021 German floods.Brigitte Nerlich & Rusi Jaspal - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):329-349.
    On 14 July 2021, the western states of Germany, Rheinland Palatinate and North-Rhein-Westphalia experienced major flash floods and about two hundred people died. This article explores how those affected and journalists they spoke to created meaning from the mayhem of an unprecedented disaster and how social representations of flooding emerged in which language, politics and values were intimately intertwined. Combining thematic analysis with elements of social representations theory, and analysing a sample of articles from a national news magazine, we show (...)
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  7.  20
    Coemergent eco-consciousness and self-consciousness.Kalpita Bhar Paul - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):253-256.
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  8.  20
    Unearthing intentionality: Building transformative capacity by reclaiming consciousness.Benedikt Schmid & Iana Nesterova - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):311-328.
    In transformation research of late, accounts on the relation between intentionality and agency on the one hand, and the more routinised and structured side of social co-existence on the other, are increasingly nuanced. However, we observe a deficiency in the way arguments are set up by the interlocutors: both, scholars who grant intentionality a central role and those who emphasise its limitations generally do so at the level of ontology – debating degrees of human capacity for conscious planning versus a (...)
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  9.  24
    Slow ecology: Local knowledge and natural restoration on the lower Danube.Stelu Şerban - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (3):258-278.
    In the first half of the 2000s, one project to restore the former Danube floodplain was carried out in Belene, a marginal town on the Bulgarian Danube. The aim of this article is to record the practices that were already in place before the interventions on the Danube, as part of a heterogeneous local knowledge that had an alternative vision to the scientific knowledge of experts involved in the restoration project. The data comes from qualitative interviews with locals and experts (...)
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  10.  22
    Participant perceptions of different forms of deliberative monetary valuation: Comparing democratic monetary valuation and deliberative democratic monetary valuation in the context of regional marine planning.Jacob Ainscough, Jasper O. Kenter, Elaine Azzopardi & A. Meriwether W. Wilson - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):189-215.
    As conceptual and theoretical discussions on environmental valuation approaches have advanced there is growing interest in the impact that valuation has on decision making. The perceived legitimacy of the outputs of valuation studies is seen as one factor influencing their impact on policy decisions. One element of this is ensuring that participants of valuation processes see the results as legitimate and would be willing to accept decisions based on these findings. Here, we test the perceived legitimacy to participants of two (...)
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  11.  12
    Reconnecting with the social-political and ecological-economic reality.Claudia E. Carter - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):103-121.
    This article critically reflects on the research portfolio by the ecological economist Clive Spash who has helped pinpoint specific and systemic blindspots in a political-economic system that prioritises myopic development trajectories divorced from ecological reality. Drawing on his published work and collaborations it seeks to make sense of the slow, or absent, progress in averting global warming and ecological destruction. Three strands of key concern and influence are identified and discussed with reference to their orientation and explicit expression regarding Ontology, (...)
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  12.  18
    Building on Spash's critiques of monetary valuation to suggest ways forward for relational values research.Rachelle K. Gould, Austin Himes, Lea May Anderson, Paola Arias Arévalo, Mollie Chapman, Dominic Lenzi, Barbara Muraca & Marc Tadaki - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):139-162.
    Scholars have critiqued mainstream economic approaches to environmental valuation for decades. These critiques have intensified with the increased prominence of environmental valuation in decision-making. This paper has three goals. First, we summarise prominent critiques of monetary valuation, drawing mostly on the work of Clive Spash, who worked extensively on cost–benefit analysis early in his career and then became one of monetary valuation's most thorough and ardent critics. Second, we, as a group of scholars who study relational values, describe how relational (...)
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  13.  25
    'I didn't count "willingness to pay" as part of the value' : Monetary valuation through respondents' perspectives.Lina Isacs, Cecilia Håkansson, Therese Lindahl, Ulrika Gunnarsson-Östling & Pernilla Andersson - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):163-188.
    A frequent justification in the literature for using stated preference methods (SP) is that they are the only methods that can capture the so-called total economic value (TEV) of environmental changes to society. Based on follow-up interviews with SP survey respondents, this paper addresses the implications of that argument by shedding light on the construction of TEV, through respondents' perspective. It illuminates the deficiencies of willingness to pay (WTP) as a measure of value presented as three aggregated themes considering respondents' (...)
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  14.  16
    ‘I didn’t count “willingness to pay” as part of the value’: Monetary valuation through respondents’ perspectives.Lina Isacs, Cecilia Håkansson, Therese Lindahl, Ulrika Gunnarsson-Östling & Pernilla Andersson - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):163-188.
    A frequent justification in the literature for using stated preference methods (SP) is that they are the only methods that can capture the so-called total economic value (TEV) of environmental changes to society. Based on follow-up interviews with SP survey respondents, this paper addresses the implications of that argument by shedding light on the construction of TEV, through respondents’ perspective. It illuminates the deficiencies of willingness to pay (WTP) as a measure of value presented as three aggregated themes considering respondents’ (...)
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  15.  16
    Being of deep transformations: A personal journey inspired by Clive L. Spash.Iana Nesterova - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):122-138.
    The works of Clive L. Spash provided inspiration to many. In the case of my own theoretical and philosophical journey, Spash's social-ecological economics became an important grounding. However, apart from directing this journey, his works have been a major influence in another domain: the domain of my personal being in and relating with the world. This paper explicates this side of Spash's influence. The paper's roots specifically go back to Spash’s work on new foundations for ecological economics and the invitation (...)
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  16.  23
    Living with integrity.John O'Neill - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):97-102.
  17.  16
    Exploring economic dimensions of social ecological crises: A reply to special issue papers.Clive L. Spash - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):216-245.
    In this paper I consider various shifts in my research and understanding stimulated by seeking how to combat social ecological crises connected to modern economies. The discussion and critical reflections are structured around five papers that were submitted to Environmental Values in an open call to address my work. A common aspect is the move away from neoclassical environmental economics, and its reductionist monetary valuation, to a more realist theory and multiple methods. This relates to my work on environmental ethics, (...)
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  18.  13
    Book Review: Foundations of Social Ecological Economics: The Fight for Revolutionary Change in Economic Thought. [REVIEW]Arild Vatn - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):246-249.
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  19.  12
    A socio-historical ontology of technics: Beyond technology.Adrián Almazán - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):12-27.
    Ours are Days of Decision and it's indispensable to transform our technics. For it, we must abandon the inherited conception of technics based on neutrality and autonomy. To this end, in this article we develop a socio-historical ontology for technics that argues: (a) To understand technics we have to take into consideration technical objects, handling, and the degree of guidance of the animal user. (b) Each technics is inseparable from its society. (c) The idea of a free use of technics (...)
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  20.  15
    The city of god revisited: Digitalism as a new technological religion.Andoni Alonso & Iñaki Arzoz - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):42-57.
    A Religion of Progress has taken shape over the last 21 centuries, from the Enlightenment to present times. It is quite simple to follow a thread from Hermeticism to today, however, several facts have altered its content, therefore, reformulating some of its promises and vision of the world. This paper attempts to evaluate how that Religion of Progress has become a sort of Techno-Hermeticism 2.0. Digital technologies have redefined old hermetic myths into a high-tech religion with dire environmental consequencies. Some (...)
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  21.  8
    A new era for Environmental Values.Tom Greaves & Norman Dandy - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):10-11.
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  22.  10
    Beyond prometheanism: Modern technologies as strategies for redistributing time and space.Alf Hornborg - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):28-41.
    Technologies developed since the late eighteenth century differ from earlier forms of technology by being as dependent on world market prices of labour, land and other biophysical resources as on human inventiveness. Yet, whether their outlook is mainstream or heterodox, modern people tend to view technology simply as ingenuity applied to nature, while oblivious of the extent to which it is contingent on the asymmetric exchange of resources in global society. Although inextricably entwined in the real world, the phenomena studied (...)
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  23.  32
    World-making technology entangled with coloniality, race and gender: Ecomodernist and degrowth perspectives.Susan Paulson - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):71-89.
    Impelled by the intertwined expansion of capitalist institutions and fossil-fueled industry, human activity has made devastating impacts on ecosystems and earth systems. The colonial, class, racial, and gender systems that coevolved with these historical processes have long been critiqued for engineering exploitation and inequality. Yet the technologies with which these systems interact are widely portrayed as neutral and nonpartisan. This paper interrogates the purported independence of technology on two fronts. First, it uses a political ecology lens to illuminate some ways (...)
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  24.  6
    The dangers of masculine technological optimism: Why feminist, antiracist values are essential for social justice, economic justice, and climate justice.Jennie C. Stephens - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):58-70.
    Responding to the climate crisis requires social and economic innovation—because climate change is a symptom of patriarchal capitalist systems that are concentrating—rather than distributing—wealth and power. Despite the need for social and economic innovation, technological innovation continues to be prioritized in climate policy and climate investments. This paper reviews the dangers of technological optimism in climate policy by exploring its links to patriarchal systems and masculinity. The disproportionate focus on science and technology emerges from and reinforces “climate isolationism,” a term (...)
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  25.  5
    Book Review: The Rise of Ecofascism: Climate Change and the Far Right. [REVIEW]Piers H. G. Stephens - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):90-92.
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  26.  11
    Book Review: Incomparable Values: Analysis, Axiomatics, and Applications. [REVIEW]Leo Yan - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (1):92-94.
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