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  1.  4
    Pathways From Environmental Ethics to Pro-Environmental Behaviours? Insights From Psychology.Chelsea Batavia, Jeremy T. Bruskotter & Michael Paul Nelson - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):317-337.
    Though largely a theoretical endeavour, environmental ethics also has a practical agenda to help humans achieve environmental sustainability. Environmental ethicists have extensively debated the grounds, contents and implications of our moral obligations to nonhuman nature, offering up different notions of an 'environmental ethic' with the presumption that, if humans adopt such an environmental ethic, they will then engage in less environmentally damaging behaviours. We assess this presumption, drawing on psychological research to discuss whether or under what conditions an environmental ethic (...)
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  2.  7
    Behaviour, Lockdown and the Natural World.Norman Dandy - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):253-259.
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  3.  2
    David N. Pellow, What is Critical Environmental Justice?Gareth A. S. Edwards - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):385-386.
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  4.  12
    Global Convergence and National Disparities in the Structure of Environmental Attitudes and Their Linkage to Pro-Environmental Behaviours.Hui-Ju Kuo & Yang-Chih Fu - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):261-291.
    Although similar environmental issues are present across the globe, residents of different countries vary in the extent to which they are concerned about and act upon these issues. Drawing on data from the 2010 Environment module of the International Social Survey Programme, this study tests the structural comparability of environmental attitudes across 32 countries and examines how pro-environmental behaviours are linked to relevant attitudes. A confirmatory factor analysis from structural equation modelling helps identify three latent constructs of environmental attitudes: willingness (...)
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  5.  4
    Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Arturo Escobar, Federico Demaria and Albert Acosta (Eds), Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary.Costas Panayotakis - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):379-381.
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  6.  2
    Alison Stone, Nature, Ethics and Gender in German Romanticism and Idealism.Sebastian Rand - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):382-384.
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  7.  8
    What Counts as Success? Wider Implications of Achieving Planning Permission in a Low-Impact Ecovillage.Fiona Shirani, Christopher Groves, Karen Henwood, Nick Pidgeon & Erin Roberts - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):339-359.
    The need for energy system change in order to address the energy 'trilemma' of security, affordability and sustainability is well documented and requires the active involvement of individuals, families and communities who currently engage with these systems and technologies. Alongside technical developments designed to address these challenges, alternative ways of living are increasingly being envisaged by those involved in low-impact development. This article draws on data from a qualitative longitudinal study involving residents of a low-impact ecovillage in West Wales, UK, (...)
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  8.  4
    Mapping Moral Pluralism in Behavioural Spillovers: A Cross-Disciplinary Account of the Multiple Ways in Which We Engage in Moral Valuing.Michael Vincent & Ann-Kathrin Koessler - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):293-315.
    In this article, we reflect critically on how moral actions are categorised in some recent studies on moral spillovers. Based on classic concepts from moral philosophy, we present a framework to categorise moral actions. We argue that with a finer classification of moral values, associated behaviour is better understood, and this understanding helps to identify the conditions under which moral licensing takes place. We illustrate our argument with examples from the literature on pro-environmental behaviours. Moral spillovers are frequently studied in (...)
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  9.  6
    A Responsibility to Revolt? Climate Ethics in the Real World.Dan Boscov-Ellen - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):153-174.
    Mainstream ethical debates concerning responsibility for climate change tend to overemphasise emissions and consumption while ignoring or downplaying the structural drivers of climate change and vulnerability. Failure to examine the political-economic dynamics that have produced climate change and made certain people more susceptible to its harms results in inapposite accounts of responsibility. Recognition of the structural character of the problem suggests duties beyond emissions reduction and redistribution - including, potentially, a responsibility to fundamentally restructure our political and economic institutions.
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  10.  4
    Incumbency, Trust and the Monsanto Effect: Stakeholder Discourses on Greenhouse Gas Removal.Emily Cox, Elspeth Spence & Nick Pidgeon - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):197-220.
    This paper explores factors shaping perceptions of Greenhouse Gas Removal amongst a range of informed stakeholders, with a particular focus on their role in future social and political systems. We find considerable ambivalence regarding the role of climate targets and incumbent interests in relation to GGR. Our results suggest that GGR is symbolic of a fundamental debate - occurring not only between separate people, but sometimes within the minds of individuals themselves - over whether technological solutions represent a pragmatic or (...)
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  11.  1
    Peter Quigley and Scott Slovic (Eds), Ecocritical Aesthetics: Language, Beauty, and the Environment.Nikolaos Gkogkas - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):250-252.
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  12.  6
    A Moral Analysis of Carbon Majors' Role in Climate Change.Marco Grasso & Katia Vladimirova - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):175-195.
    Two-thirds of global industrial greenhouse gas emissions over the past two centuries can be traced to the activities of a handful of companies. Based on their direct contribution to climate change in terms of carbon emissions and on a number of morally relevant facts, this article proposes a normative framework to establish the responsibilities that carbon majors have in relation to climate change. Then, the analysis articulates these responsibilities in the form of two duties: a duty of decarbonisation and a (...)
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  13.  3
    Towards a Process Epistemology for the Analysis of Social-Ecological System.Maria Mancilla Garcia, Tilman Hertz & Maja Schlüter - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):221-239.
    This paper proposes an epistemological approach to analyse social-ecological systems from a process perspective in order to better tackle the co-constitution of the social and the ecological and the dynamism of these systems. It highlights the usefulness of rethinking our conceptual tools taking processes and relations as the main constituents of reality instead of fundamental substances or essences. We introduce the concept of experience as understood in radical empiricism to critically revise our available concepts through focusing on the concept of (...)
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  14.  4
    John Basl, The Death of the Ethic of Life.Katie McShane - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):241-243.
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  15. Giorgos Kallis, Degrowth.Susan Paulson - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):244-246.
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  16.  1
    Mark I. Wallace, When God Was a Bird: Christianity, Animism, and the Re-Enchantment of the World.Terra Schwerin Rowe - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):247-249.
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  17.  7
    How Far is Degrowth a Really Revolutionary Counter Movement to Neoliberalism?Dorothea Elena Schoppek - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):131-151.
    Capitalism is often modernised and stabilised by its very critics. Gramsci called this paradox a 'passive revolution'. What are the pitfalls through which critique becomes absorbed? This question is taken up using a Cultural Political Economy approach for analysing the resistant potential of 'degrowth discourses' against the neoliberal hegemony. Degrowth advocates an economy without growth in order to achieve the transformation that is necessary in ecological and social terms. It thus does not follow the neoliberal idea of green capitalism that (...)
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  18.  1
    The Revolution Will Not Be Corporatised!Clive L. Spash - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (2):121-130.
    The plain speaking of the new environmental movements places emphasis on an imminent ecological crisis, but the 'new' environmentalists appear to lack insight into what specific action is required, to what they stand in opposition and more generally the political and economic context within which they are operating. The fact is that political and economic elites around the world have long been taking 'environmental action', to protect not Nature but themselves, against environmentalists and environmental regulation. The papers in this issue (...)
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  19.  12
    The Ethics of Human Intervention on Behalf of 'Others'.Claudia Carter - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):1-7.
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  20.  16
    Uncomplicating the Idea of Wilderness.Joshua S. Duclos - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):89-107.
    In this paper I identify and respond to four persistent objections to the idea of wilderness: empirical, cultural, philosophical and environmental. Despite having dogged the wilderness debate for decades, none of these objections withstands scrutiny; rather they are misplaced criticisms that hinder fruitful discussion of the philosophical ramifications of wilderness by needlessly complicating the idea itself. While there may be other justifiable concerns about the idea of wilderness, it is time to move beyond the four discussed in this paper.
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  21.  10
    Christopher J. Preston, The Synthetic Age: Outdesigning Evolution, Resurrecting Species, and Reengineering Our World.Simon Hailwood - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):112-114.
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  22.  16
    J. Baird Callicott, John van Buren and Keith Wayne Brown, Greek Natural Philosophy: The Presocratics and Their Importance for Environmental Philosophy.Alan Holland - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):109-111.
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  23.  12
    Urban Greening and Human-Wildlife Relations in Philadelphia: From Animal Control to Multispecies Coexistence?Christian Hunold - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):67-87.
    City-scale urban greening is expanding wildlife habitat in previously less hospitable urban areas. Does this transformation also prompt a reckoning with the longstanding idea that cities are places intended to satisfy primarily human needs? I pose this question in the context of one of North America's most ambitious green infrastructure programmes to manage urban runoff: Philadelphia's Green City, Clean Waters. Given that the city's green infrastructure plans have little to say about wildlife, I investigate how wild animals fit into urban (...)
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  24. To Assist or Not to Assist? Assessing the Potential Moral Costs of Humanitarian Intervention in Nature.Kyle Johannsen - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):29-45.
    In light of the extent of wild animal suffering, some philosophers have adopted the view that we should cautiously assist wild animals on a large scale. Recently, their view has come under criticism. According to one objection, even cautious intervention is unjustified because fallibility is allegedly intractable. By contrast, a second objection states that we should abandon caution and intentionally destroy habitat in order to prevent wild animals from reproducing. In my paper, I argue that intentional habitat destruction is wrong (...)
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  25.  9
    Idil Boran, Political Theory and Global Climate Action: Recasting the Public Sphere.Corey Katz - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):115-117.
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  26.  24
    The Wild in Fire: Human Aid to Wildlife in the Disasters of the Anthropocene.Andrew McCumber & Zachary King - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):47-66.
    Should you help a wild rabbit fleeing a wall of flame? What is our responsibility to wildlife affected by wildfire? This paper focuses on two cases of ad hoc public aid to wildlife that occurred during California's 2017 'Thomas Fire' and were subsequently popularised online. We take the discourse surrounding these cases - specifically, a viral video of a man removing a wild rabbit from the fire's flames and the widespread call to leave out buckets of water for displaced animals (...)
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  27.  12
    Amy J. Fitzgerald, Animal Advocacy and Environmentalism: Understanding and Bridging the Divide.Erin McKenna - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):118-120.
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  28.  11
    Is Nonanthropocentrism Anti-Democratic?Mark Alan Michael - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):9-28.
    Environmental pragmatists such as Ben Minteer and Bryan Norton have argued that there is an anti-democratic strain to be found in the work of some nonanthropocentrists. I examine three possible sources of the pragmatists' concern: the claim that nonanthropocentrists know the political truth, the claim that those who disagree with their basic principle should be excluded from discussions of policy and the claim that their basic principle is self-evident. I argue here that none of these claims are objectionably anti-democratic when (...)
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