Year:

  1.  4
    Why Economic Valuation Does Not Value the Environment: Climate Policy as Collective Endeavour.Nicholas Bardsley, Graziano Ceddia, Rachel McCloy & Simone Pfuderer - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):277-293.
    Economics takes an individualistic approach to human behaviour. This is reflected in the use of 'contingent valuation' surveys to conduct cost benefit analysis for economic policy evaluation. An individual's valuation of a policy is assumed to be unaffected by the burdens it places on others. We report a survey experiment to test this supposition in the context of climate change policy. Willingness to pay for climate change mitigation was higher when richer individuals were to bear higher costs than when, as (...)
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  2.  24
    Plant Philosophy and Interpretation: Making Sense of Contemporary Plant Intelligence Debates.Yogi H. Hendlin - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):253-276.
    Plant biologists widely accept plants demonstrate capacities for intelligence. However, they disagree over the interpretive, ethical and nomenclatural questions arising from these findings: how to frame the issue and how to signify the implications. Through the trope of 'plant neurobiology' describing plant root systems as analogous to animal brains and nervous systems, plant intelligence is mobilised to raise the status of plants. In doing so, however, plant neurobiology accepts an anthropocentric moral extensionist framework requiring plants to anthropomorphically meet animal standards (...)
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  3.  10
    Heterotopia as an Environmental and Political Concept: The Case of Hannah Arendt's Philosophy.Urszula Lisowska - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):345-363.
    The paper offers a new model of politics adequate for the Anthropocene epoch. It uses the concept of 'heterotopia' to argue for the environmental potential of Arendtian political philosophy. The adopted meaning of heterotopia combines its Foucauldian and medical sources. It is argued that, thus understood, the concept can be applied to the Arendtian idea of judgment. In this capacity, the concept of heterotopia is both politically foundational and environmentally relevant. It helps us maintain the idea of politics as humanely (...)
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  4.  4
    World, Word, Work.Elke Pirgmaier - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):245-252.
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  5.  8
    What Makes an Environmental Steward? An Individual Differences Approach.Ryan Plummer, Julia Baird & Gillian Dale - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):295-322.
    Engaging in environmental stewardship is critical for sustainability. Understanding individual differences and engagement is an important gap in present scholarship and addressing it is necessary to understand individual factors that relate to the types of activities engaged in, motivations and barriers to environmental stewardship. We surveyed 637 Canadian and American adults via Amazon Mechanical Turk, querying a range of demographic, psychological and environmental perceptions factors as well as motivations and barriers to stewardship activities. Respondents were ultimately grouped into Non-Stewards, Home-Oriented (...)
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  6.  10
    Evidence of Degrowth Values in Food Justice in a Northern Canadian Municipality.Amanda Rooney & Helen Vallianatos - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):323-343.
    Our case study draws on emerging ideas of degrowth, showing how degrowth values and strategies may emerge where cities rely heavily on global food systems, and contributes to literature on food for degrowth in local contexts. Degrowth rejects the imperative of economic growth as a primary indicator of social wellness. A holistic understanding of wellness prescribes radical societal transformation, downscaling and decreasing consumption, strengthening community relationships and promoting resilience. Building on Bloemmen et al., we apply a holistic model of degrowth (...)
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  7.  1
    Christine Harold, Things Worth Keeping: The Value of Attachment in a Disposable World.Piers H. G. Stephens - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):371-373.
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  8.  3
    Sarah McFarland Taylor, Ecopiety: Green Media and the Dilemma of Environmental Virtue.Gabriel Vasquez-Peterson - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):365-367.
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  9. Amanda H. Lynch and Siri Veland, Urgency in the Anthropocene.Nora Ward - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):368-370.
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  10.  8
    Unnatural Pumas and Domestic Foxes: Relations with Protected Predators and Conspiratorial Rumours in Southern Chile.Pelayo Benavides & Julián Caviedes - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):131-152.
    Human-wildlife conflicts involving protected predators are a major social and environmental problem worldwide. A critical aspect in such conflicts is the role of state institutions regarding predators' conservation, and how this is construed by affected local populations. These interpretations are frequently embodied in conspiratorial rumours, sharing some common traits related to wild and domestic categories, spatial ordering and power relations. In southern Chile, a one-year, multi-sited ethnographic study of human-animal relations in and adjacent to protected areas was undertaken, foregrounding conspiratorial (...)
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  11.  16
    Justifying an Intentional Species Extinction: The Case of Anopheles Gambiae.Daniel Edward Callies & Yasha Rohwer - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):193-210.
    Each year, over 200 million people are infected with the malaria parasite, nearly half a million of whom succumb to the disease. Emerging genetic technologies could, in theory, eliminate the burden of malaria throughout the world by intentionally eradicating the mosquitoes that transmit the disease. In this paper, we offer an ethical examination of the intentional eradication of Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector of sub-Saharan Africa. In our evaluation, we focus on two main considerations: the benefit of alleviating the (...)
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  12.  9
    Learning to Walk with Turtles: Steps Towards a Sacred Perception of the Environment.Gustavo Ruiz Chiesa & Luz Gonçalves Brito - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):177-192.
    What can we learn from the open and attentive perception of children and poets? How does this perception contribute to a methodology that reaches the intricate entanglement of worldly phenomena in its entire otherness? In this essay, we aim to answer these questions, taking into account the phenomenological grounds which lead us to achieve a singular state of perception and, therefore, a more crystal clear knowledge of the beings and things in the lived world. We seek to explore other forms (...)
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  13. Duncan Kelly, Politics and the Anthropocene.Forrest Clingerman - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):241-243.
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  14.  2
    Erin McKenna, Living with Animals: Rights, Responsibilities, and Respect.Kimberly Dill - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):237-240.
  15.  3
    Learning to Live With and Without Animals.Thomas Greaves & Norman Dandy - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):125-130.
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  16. Plurality, Engagement, Openness.Tom Greaves & Norman Dandy - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):115-124.
    As incoming Editor and Deputy Editor we describe our impression of the current situation that those committed to understanding and upholding environmental values find themselves in. We consider some of the factors that make enviornmental concern difficult to maintain, including conditions that affect us as academics, publishers, global citizens and activists. We describe some of the emerging trends that have appeared in Environmental Values in recent years, in philosophy, ecological economics, critical social science and widening interdisciplinarity in the environmental humanities. (...)
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  17.  4
    Homecoming Without Nostalgia: Local Communities and the Reintroduction of the Wild Forest Reindeer (Rangifer Tarandus Sennicus) in Finland.Juha Hiedanpää & Jani Pellikka - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):153-175.
    Wildlife translocations often raise concerns about the purpose and impact among people living in target locations. We applied the integrated impact assessment in planning the reintroduction of wild forest reindeer in Finland. We investigated the variety of expected socioecological impacts, the relative importance of these impacts and local willingness to participate in local-level reintroduction activities. The reintroduction project organised interactive forums in 2013 and 2016 in each of the four regions suitable for wild forest reindeer. The variety of recognised potential (...)
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  18.  41
    Red in Tooth and Claw No More: Animal Rights and the Permissibility to Redesign Nature.Connor K. Kianpour & Eze Paez - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):211-231.
    Most non-human animals live in the wild and it is probable that suffering predominates in their lives due to natural events. Humans may at some point be able to engage in paradise engineering, or the modification of nature and animal organisms themselves, to improve the well-being of wild animals. We may, in other words, make nature 'red in tooth and claw' no more. We argue that this creates a tension between environmental ethics and animal ethics which is likely insurmountable. First, (...)
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  19. Giorgos Kallis, Susan Paulson, Giacomo D'Alisa and Federico Demaria, The Case for Degrowth.Stephen Quilley - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):233-236.
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  20.  47
    Global Climate Change and Aesthetics.Emily Brady - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):27-46.
    What kinds of issues does the global crisis of climate change present to aesthetics, and how will they challenge the field to respond? This paper argues that a new research agenda is needed for aesthetics with respect to global climate change and outlines a set of foundational issues which are especially pressing: attention to environments that have been neglected by philosophers, for example, the cryosphere and aerosphere; negative aesthetics of environment, in order to grasp aesthetic experiences, meanings, and dis/values in (...)
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  21.  1
    Steve Vanderheiden, Environmental Political Theory.Peter F. Cannavò - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):110-112.
  22.  8
    The Disorienting Aesthetics of Mashed-Up Anthropocene Environments.Marcello Di Paola & Serena Ciccarelli - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):85-106.
    This paper describes the disorienting aesthetics of some environments that are characteristic of the Anthropocene. We refer to these environments as 'mashed-up' and present three dimensions - phenomenological, epistemological and narrative - of the aesthetic disorientation they can trigger. We then advance the suggestion that a rich, nuanced and meaningful aesthetic experience of mashed-up Anthropocene environments calls for a mode of appreciation grounded on performative practices of aesthetic familiarisation with particular MAEs and entities and processes thereof. Familiarisation with MAEs, we (...)
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  23.  8
    Rescaling the Weather Experience: From an Object of Aesthetics to a Matter of Concern.Madalina Diaconu - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):67-84.
    This paper analyses the cluster of aesthetic features involved in the common experience of the weather. Perceptual features are accompanied by 'atmospheric' moods that are irreducible to physiological well-being. Representation and imagination reach their limits due to the more-than-human spatiotemporal scale of the atmosphere. Finally, some 'transaesthetic' aspects include the agency of an active matter and the longing for an elemental alterity. The aesthetics of the weather has to account for the interdependence between aesthetic and ethical values, between bodily engagement (...)
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  24.  20
    Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature and the Global Environmental Crisis.Jukka Mikkonen - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):47-66.
    Global climate change has been characterised as the crisis of reason, imagination and language, to mention some. The 'everything change', as Margaret Atwood calls it, arguably also impacts on how we aesthetically perceive, interpret and appreciate nature. This article looks at philosophical theories of nature appreciation against global environmental change. The article examines how human-induced global climate change affects the 'scientific' approaches to nature appreciation which base aesthetic judgment on scientific knowledge and the competing 'non-scientific' approaches which emphasise the role (...)
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  25.  8
    Philosophical Aesthetics and the Global Environmental Emergency.Jukka Mikkonen & Sanna Lehtinen - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):15-26.
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  26.  1
    David M. Kaplan, Food Philosophy: An Introduction.Claire Worthington Mills - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):113-114.
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  27.  6
    Three Decades of Environmental Values: Some Personal Reflections.Clive L. Spash - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):1-14.
    The journal Environmental Values is thirty years old. In this retrospective, as the retiring Editor-in-Chief, I provide a set of personal reflections on the changing landscape of scholarship in the field. This historical overview traces developments from the journal's origins in debates between philosophers, sociologists, and economists in the UK to the conflicts over policy on climate change, biodiversity/non-humans and sustainability. Along the way various negative influences are mentioned, relating to how the values of Nature are considered in policy, including (...)
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  28.  1
    Endre Szécsényi (Ed.), Aesthetics, Nature and Religion: Ronald W. Hepburn and His Legacy.Levi Tenen - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (1):107-109.
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  29.  9
    Legitimate Expectations: Assessing Policies of Transformation to a Low-Carbon Society.Lukas H. Meyer & Santiago Truccone-Borgogno - 2022 - Environmental Values 31:1-20.
    Legitimate expectations should be considered in the transition to a low-carbon society. After explaining under what conditions and circumstances expectations are legitimate, this paper shows that those expectations whose frustration undermines the ability to plan, infringes basic moral rights, or is extremely costly for its bearer might justify a deviation in the baseline of justice in favour of the expectation holder. People should be notified about the likely frustration of their expectations so that they can avoid the frustration of their (...)
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