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  1.  3
    On (Un)Naturalness.Jan Deckers - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):297-318.
    Many scholars have argued that the distinction between the natural and the unnatural does not have any moral relevance, either because the distinction does not make sense or because, even if it does make sense, it does not make any moral sense. Before we can decide on the latter, we must therefore determine first whether a semantic distinction can be made. In this article, I argue that the distinction can be maintained. In spite of the fact that the categories of (...)
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  2. John Lauritz Larson, Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America.Brian Allen Drake - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):387-389.
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  3.  5
    The Social Specificity of Societal Nature Relations in a Flexible Capitalist Society.Dennis Eversberg - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):319-343.
    Based on analyses of a 2016 German survey, this article contributes to debates on 'societal nature relations' by investigating the systematic differences between socially specific types of social relations with nature in a flexible capitalist society. It presents a typology of ten different 'syndromes' of attitudes toward social and environmental issues, which are then grouped to distinguish between four ideal types of social relationships with nature: dominance, conscious mutual dependency, alienation and contradiction. These are located in Pierre Bourdieu's social space (...)
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  4.  9
    The Nature of Degrowth: Theorising the Core of Nature for the Degrowth Movement.Pasi Heikkurinen - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):367-385.
    This article investigates human-nature relations in the light of the recent call for degrowth, a radical reduction of matter-energy throughput in over-producing and over-consuming cultures. It outlines a culturally sensitive response to a paradox where humans embedded in nature experience alienation and estrangement from it. The article finds that if nature has a core, then the experienced distance makes sense. To describe the core of nature, three temporal lenses are employed: the core of nature as 'the past', 'the future', and (...)
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  5.  7
    Towards Degrowth? Making Peace with Mortality to Reconnect with (One's) Nature: An Ecopsychological Proposition for a Paradigm Shift.Sarah Koller - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):345-366.
    This article explores the existential conditions for a transition towards socioeconomic degrowth through an analysis of a paradigm shift between two extreme polarities of socio-ecological positioning: the Dominant Social Paradigm and the New Ecological Paradigm. It is suggested that the transition from one to the other - understood as the first collective step towards degrowth - requires a transformation in the way we, in western capitalist society, define ourselves in relation to nature. This identity transformation corresponds with the reconnection between (...)
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  6.  1
    Gregory S. McElwain, Mary Midgley: An Introduction.Benjamin Lipscomb - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):390-392.
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  7.  1
    The Logic of Modernity and Ecological Crisis.Simon Lumsden - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):277-296.
    This paper examines the theory of sustainable development presented by Jeffrey Sachs in The Age of Sustainable Development. While Sustainable Development ostensibly seeks to harmonise the conflict between ecological sustainability and human development, the paper argues this is impossible because of the conceptual frame it employs. Rather than allowing for a re-conceptualisation of the human-nature relation, Sustainable Development is simply the latest and possibly last attempt to advance the core idea of western modernity — the notion of self-determination. Drawing upon (...)
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  8.  1
    Jennifer E. Telesca, Red Gold: The Managed Extinction of the Giant Bluefin Tuna.Gerry Nagtzaam - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):393-395.
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  9.  1
    Conceptualising Nature: From Dasgupta to Degrowth.Clive L. Spash - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):265-275.
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  10.  17
    Religion in the Age of the Anthropocene.Arianne Françoise Conty - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):215-234.
    Though responses to the Anthropocene have largely come from the natural and social sciences, religious responses to the Anthropocene have also been gaining momentum and many scholars have been calling for a religious response to complement scientific responses to climate change. Yet because Genesis 1:28 does indeed tell human beings to 'subdue the earth' monotheistic religions have often been understood as complicit in the human exceptionalism that is thought to have created the conditions for the Anthropocene. In distinction to such (...)
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  11.  3
    How Long Will Business as Usual Be Sustained?Norman Dandy - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):141-146.
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  12.  3
    C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis and Byron Williston (Eds), Canadian Environmental Philosophy.Lisa Kretz - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):261-263.
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  13.  4
    Christopher J. Orr, Kaitlin Kish and Bruce Jennings (Eds), Liberty and the Ecological Crisis: Freedom on a Finite Planet.Jason Lambacher - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):258-260.
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  14.  6
    Roger S. Gottlieb, Morality and the Environmental Crisis.Piers H. G. Stephens - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):255-257.
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  15.  5
    Hermeneutics at the Time of the Anthropocene: The Case of Hans-Georg Gadamer.Patryk Szaj - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):235-254.
    The article puts forward the thesis that Hans-Georg Gadamer's hermeneutics can be useful for conceptualising the issue of the Anthropocene. Both speculative features of hermeneutics generally and specific Gadamerian insights are helpful for this matter. As for the speculative features of hermeneutics, the concept of understanding may be used, as well as Gadamer's analysis of prejudices and of the history of effect. Further, Gadamer's ecological insights anticipated some problems raised by the philosophy of the Anthropocene and are therefore also helpful (...)
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  16.  12
    The Norwegian Petroleum Fund: Savings for Future Generations?Marianne Takle - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):147-167.
    The Norwegian state-owned Petroleum Fund's market value is more than one trillion US dollars, and the Norwegian state has become one of the world's largest stockowners. The Fund was established in 1990 and in 2006 and renamed the 'Government Pension Fund Global', as savings for future generations. What kind of values form the basis for describing the Petroleum Fund in this way? This article shows that the idea that present generations should not empty the North Sea of oil and gas (...)
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  17.  2
    A Green Intervention in Media Production Culture Studies: Environmental Values, Political Economy and Mobile Production.Hunter Vaughan - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):193-214.
    This article develops an interdisciplinary theoretical method for assessing the environmental values articulated and practised by dispersive or 'mobile' film production practices, aiming toward applicable strategies to make media practices more environmentally conscientious and sustainable. Providing a social and environmental study of the local relational values, political economy and ecosystem ramifications of runaway productions and film incentive programmes, this study draws on contemporary international green production practices as entryways into environmentally positive film industry change. Offering an overview of the potential (...)
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  18.  3
    Towards a Philosophy of a Bio-Based Economy: A Levinassian Perspective on the Relations Between Economic and Ecological Systems.Roel Veraart & Vincent Blok - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):169-192.
    This paper investigates the fundamental idea at stake in current bioeconomies such as Europe's Bio-Based Economy. We argue that basing an economy upon ecology is an ambivalent effort, causing confusion and inconsistencies, and that the dominant framing of the damaged biosphere as a market-failure in bioeconomies such as the BBE is problematic. To counter this dominant narrative, we present alternative conceptualisations of bio-economies and indicate which concepts are overlooked. We highlight the specific contradictions and discrepancies in the relation between economy (...)
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  19.  2
    Institutional Context, Political-Value Orientation and Public Attitudes Towards Climate Policies: A Qualitative Follow-Up Study of an Experiment.Marianne Aasen & Arild Vatn - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):43-63.
    In this paper, we are interested in the effects of institutional context on public attitudes towards climate policies, where institutions are defined as the conventions, norms and formally sanctioned rules of any given society. Building on a 2014 survey experiment, we conducted thirty qualitative interviews with car-owners in Oslo, Norway, to investigate the ways in which institutional context and political-value orientation affect public attitudes towards emissions policies. One context highlighted individual rationality, emphasising the ways in which local pollution impacts the (...)
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  20.  22
    Biocentric Individualism and Biodiversity Conservation: An Argument From Parsimony.Patrik Baard - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):93-110.
    This article argues that holistic ecocentrism unnecessarily introduces elements to explain why we ought to halt biodiversity loss. I suggest that atomistic accounts can justify the same conclusion by utilising fewer elements. Hence, why we ought to preserve biodiversity can be made reasonable without adding elements such as intrinsic values of ecosystems or moral obligations to conserve collectives of organisms. Between two equally good explanations of the same phenomenon, the explanation utilising fewer elements, which speaks in favour of atomistic accounts, (...)
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  21.  7
    Solving for Pattern: An Ecological Approach to Reshape the Human Building Instinct.Geetanjali Date, Deborah Dutta & Sanjay Chandrasekharan - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):65-92.
    The human species' adaptive advantage is driven by its ability to build new material structures and artefacts. Engineering is the modern manifestation of this building instinct, and its advent has made the construction and use of technologies the central pattern of human life. In parallel, efficiency, the overarching narrative driving technology and related life practices, has pervaded most occupations as a value, forming a cultural backdrop that implicitly guides decisions and behaviour. We examine the process through which this backdrop has (...)
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  22.  6
    Consequential Choices in a Challenging Time.Marion Hourdequin - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):1-5.
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  23.  4
    Alasdair Cochrane, Sentientist Politics: A Theory of Global Inter-Species Justice.Robert C. Jones - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):134-136.
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  24.  2
    Transforming Fair Decision-Making About Sea-Level Rise in Cities: The Values and Beliefs of Residents in Botany Bay, Australia.Ann Maree Kreller - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):7-42.
    Sea-level rise is a threat to coastal areas and there is growing interest in how social values, risk perception and fairness can inform adaptation. This study applies these three concepts to an urban community at risk of SLR in Botany Bay, Australia. The study engaged diverse groups of residents via an online survey. Cluster analysis identified four interpretive communities: two groups value work-life balance, are concerned about SLR and would likely engage in collective adaptation. The third group value everything about (...)
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  25.  5
    Ethan Miller, Reimagining Livelihoods: Life Beyond Economy, Society, and Environment.Christian A. Kull - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):137-139.
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  26.  4
    Akeel Bilgrami (Ed.), Nature and Value.Brendon M. H. Larson - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):131-133.
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  27.  14
    Hard Environmental Choices: Comparability, Justification and the Argument From Moral Identity.Espen Dyrnes Stabell - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (1):111-130.
    In decision-making based on multiple criteria, situations may arise where agents find their options to be neither better than, worse than nor equal to each other with respect to the relevant criteria. How, if at all, can a justified choice be made between such options? Are the options incomparable? This article explores a hypothetical case that illustrates how such a situation can arise in an environmental context; more specifically, it considers the deliberations of an imagined 'ethics committee' as it struggles (...)
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