Year:

  1.  13
    The Ape That Understood the Universe: How the Mind and Culture Evolve by Steve Stewart-Williams. [REVIEW]Ivan Gonzalez-Cabrera - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 95:150.
    What explains the distinctive features of human behavior? In this book, Stewart-Williams aims to answer this ambitious question. This book is an engaging addition to the already long list of recent attempts to provide an evolutionary explanation of human uniqueness. It is organized into six chapters, plus two appendices. These chapters address several key topics in evolutionary theory, sex differences and sexual behavior, altruism, and cultural evolution, albeit with varying degrees of detail and depth. These topics include sexual selection, kin (...)
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  2.  5
    Identity, Politics, and the Pandemic: Why is COVID-19 a Disaster for Feminism(S)?Suze G. Berkhout & Lisa Richardson - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-6.
    COVID-19 has been called “a disaster for feminism” for numerous reasons. In this short piece, we make sense of this claim, drawing on intersectional feminism to understand why an analysis that considers gender alone is inadequate to address both the risks and consequences of COVID-19.
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  3.  2
    Alan C. Love & William C. Wimsatt (Eds.), Beyond the Meme: Development and Structure in Cultural Evolution, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 22, Minneapolis/London: University of Minnesota Press, 2019, Xxxii + 510 Pp. [REVIEW]Mathieu Charbonneau - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-4.
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  4.  3
    M Ichael T Omasello, Becoming Human: A Theory of Ontogeny, Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2019, Xi + 379 Pp, $35.00/£28.95/€31.50. [REVIEW]Ivan Gonzalez-Cabrera - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-5.
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  5.  2
    R oman G öbel, G erhard M üller, & C laudia T aszus (eds.), Ernst Haeckel: Ausgewählte Briefwechsel. Band 2: Familienkorrespondenz August 1854 – März 1857, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2019, lvi + 654 pp., €139,00. [REVIEW]Christiane Groeben - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-4.
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  6.  1
    Making the Anaesthetised Animal Into a Boundary Object: An Analysis of the 1875 Royal Commission on Vivisection.Tarquin Holmes & Carrie Friese - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-28.
    This paper explores how, at the 1875 Royal Commission on Vivisection, the anaesthetised animal was construed as a boundary object around which “cooperation without consensus” Computer supported cooperative work: cooperation or conflict? Springer, London, 1993) could form, serving the interests of both scientists and animals. Advocates of anaesthesia presented it as benevolently intervening between the scientific agent and animal patient. Such articulations of ‘ethical’ vivisection through anaesthesia were then mandated in the 1876 Cruelty to Animals Act, and thus have had (...)
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  7.  3
    “Organismic” positions in early German-speaking ecology and its (almost) forgotten dissidents.Kurt Jax - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-31.
    In early German ecology, the key concept used to refer to a synecological unit was Biozönose. Taken together with the concept of the Biotop, it was also understood as an integrated higher-order unit of life, sometimes called a “Holozön”. These units were often perceived as having properties similar to those of individual organisms, and they informed the mainstream of German ecology until at least the late 1960s. Here I ask how “organismic” these concepts really were and what conceptual problems they (...)
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  8. Emergence of Scientific Understanding in Real-Time Ecological Research Practice.Luana Poliseli - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-25.
    Scientific understanding as a subject of inquiry has become widely discussed in philosophy of science and is often addressed through case studies from history of science. Even though these historical reconstructions engage with details of scientific practice, they usually provide only limited information about the gradual formation of understanding in ongoing processes of model and theory construction. Based on a qualitative ethnographic study of an ecological research project, this article shifts attention from understanding in the context of historical case studies (...)
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  9.  1
    COVID-19, other zoonotic diseases and wildlife conservation.Carlos Santana - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-3.
    Many experts have warned that environmental degradation is increasing the likelihood of future pandemics like COVID-19, as habitat loss and poaching increase close contact between wildlife and people. This fact has been framed as a reason to increase wildlife conservation efforts. We have many good reasons to step up conservation efforts, but arguments for doing so on the basis of pandemic prevention are rhetorically, ethically, and empricially flawed.
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  10.  6
    Of Elephants and Errors: Naming and Identity in Linnaean Taxonomy.Joeri Witteveen & Staffan Müller-Wille - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-34.
    What is it to make an error in the identification of a named taxonomic group? In this article we argue that the conditions for being in error about the identity of taxonomic groups through their names have a history, and that the possibility of committing such errors is contingent on the regime of institutions and conventions governing taxonomy and nomenclature at any given point in time. More specifically, we claim that taxonomists today can be in error about the identity of (...)
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  11.  5
    Biological Taxon Names Are Descriptive Names.Jerzy A. Brzozowski - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-25.
    The so-called ‘type method’ widely employed in biological taxonomy is often seen as conforming to the causal-historical theory of reference. In this paper, I argue for an alternative account of reference for biological nomenclature in which taxon names are understood as descriptive names. A descriptive name, as the concept came to be known from the work of Gareth Evans, is a referring expression introduced by a definite description. There are three main differences between the DN and the causal account. First, (...)
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  12.  6
    What’s All the Fuss About? The Inheritance of Acquired Traits is Compatible with the Central Dogma.M. Polo Camacho - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-15.
    The Central Dogma of molecular biology, which holds that DNA makes protein and not the other way around, is as influential as it is controversial. Some believe the Dogma has outlived its usefulness, either because it fails to fully capture the ins-and-outs of protein synthesis (Griffiths and Stotz, 2013; Stotz, 2006), because it turns on a confused notion of information (Sarkar, 2004), or because it problematically assumes the unidirectional flow of information from DNA to protein (Gottlieb, 2001). This paper evaluates (...)
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  13.  4
    Sexual division and the new mythology: Goethe and Schelling.Stefani Engelstein - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-24.
    The new mythology for which the German Romantic period called was not envisioned as antithetical to empiricism or experiential/experimental knowledge, but rather as emerging in dialogue with it to form a cultural foundation for such inquiry. Central to the mytho-scientific project were problematic theories of sexual division and generativity that established cultural baselines. This article examines the mythological investments of two influential thinkers of the period—Goethe and Schelling. It then analyzes Goethe’s unique merger of mythological approaches to sex and generation (...)
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  14.  3
    Ecological Laws for Agroecological Design: The Need for More Organized Collaboration in Producing, Evaluating and Updating Ecological Generalizations.Oswaldo Forey & Stefan Linquist - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-20.
    The applied discipline of agroecological design provides a useful case study for examining broader philosophical questions about the existence and importance of ecological generalizations or “laws.” Recent developments in the availability and use of formal meta-analyses have led to the discovery of many resilient generalizations in ecology. However, these “laws” face numerous challenges when it comes to their practical application. Concerns about their reliability and scope might stem from unclear logical and epistemic connections to more foundational or “unifying” generalizations, 2019) (...)
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  15.  5
    The Aesthetic Dimension of Scientific Discovery: Finding the Inter-Maxillary Bone in Humans.Jorge L. García - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-30.
    This paper examines the points of disagreement between Petrus Camper and J. W. von Goethe regarding the existence of the inter-maxillary bone in humans as the link between man and the rest of nature. This historical case illustrates the fundamental role of aesthetic judgements in scientific discovery. Thus, I shall show how the eighteenth century discovery of the inter-maxillary bone in humans was largely determined by aesthetic factors—specifically, those sets of assumptions and criteria implied in the aesthetic schemata of Camper (...)
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  16.  4
    Ineluctably Us: Early Hominid Discoveries, Mass Media, and the Reification of Human Ancestors.Tj Gundling - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-27.
    Even as paleoanthropology becomes increasingly sophisticated in revealing both the broad contours and the details of the deep evolutionary history of Homo sapiens, it continues to be informed by lingering pre-evolutionary residues. Specifically, the goal of prior research was to demonstrate that the influence of the ancient Scala Naturae as an organizing principle significantly contributed to the scientific community’s delayed acceptance of Australopithecus as a plesiomorphic member of the Hominidae. The present study extends this research through a selective examination of (...)
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  17.  5
    Introduction: Microbes, Networks, Knowledge—Disease Ecology and Emerging Infectious Diseases in Time of COVID-19.Mark Honigsbaum & Pierre-Olivier Méthot - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-9.
    This is an introduction to the topical collection Microbes, Networks, Knowledge: Disease Ecology in the twentieth Century, based on a workshop held at Queen Mary, University London on July 6–7 2016. More than twenty years ago, historian of science and medicine Andrew Mendelsohn asked, “Where did the modern, ecological understanding of epidemic disease come from?” Moving beyond Mendelsohn’s answer, this collection of new essays considers the global history of disease ecology in the past century and shows how epidemics and pandemics (...)
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  18.  2
    Explanatory Goals and Explanatory Means in Multilevel Selection Theory.Ciprian Jeler - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-24.
    It has become customary in multilevel selection theory to use the same terms to denote both two explanatory goals and two explanatory means. This paper spells out some of the benefits that derive from avoiding this terminological conflation. I argue that keeping explanatory means and goals well apart allows us to see that, contrary to a popular recent idea, Price’s equation and contextual analysis—the statistical methods most extensively used for measuring the effects of certain evolutionary factors on the change in (...)
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  19.  31
    The History and Philosophy of Taxonomy as an Information Science.Catherine Kendig & Joeri Witteveen - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-9.
    We undeniably live in an information age—as, indeed, did those who lived before us. After all, as the cultural historian Robert Darnton pointed out: ‘every age was an age of information, each in its own way’ (Darnton 2000: 1). Darnton was referring to the news media, but his insight surely also applies to the sciences. The practices of acquiring, storing, labeling, organizing, retrieving, mobilizing, and integrating data about the natural world has always been an enabling aspect of scientific work. Natural (...)
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  20.  1
    D Avid C Eccarelli & G Iulia F Rezza (Eds.), Predictability and the Unpredictable. Life, Evolution and Behaviour, Roma: CNR Edizioni, 2018, 288 Pp. [REVIEW]Nicolas Pastor - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-3.
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  21.  3
    Neanderthals as Familiar Strangers and the Human Spark: How the ‘Golden Years’ of Neanderthal Research Reopen the Question of Human Uniqueness.Susan Peeters & Hub Zwart - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-26.
    During the past decades, our image of Homo neanderthalensis has changed dramatically. Initially, Neanderthals were seen as primitive brutes. Increasingly, however, Neanderthals are regarded as basically human. New discoveries and technologies have led to an avalanche of data, and as a result of that it becomes increasingly difficult to pinpoint what the difference between modern humans and Neanderthals really is. And yet, the persistent quest for a minimal difference which separates them from us is still noticeable in Neanderthal research. Neanderthal (...)
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  22.  2
    Why Translational Medicine is, in Fact, “New,” Why This Matters, and the Limits of a Predominantly Epistemic Historiography.Mark Robinson - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-22.
    Is Translational Science and Medicine new? Its dramatic expansion has spelled a dizzying array of new disciplines, departments, buildings, and terminology. Yet, without novel theories or concepts, Translational Science and Medicine may appear to be nothing more than an old concept with a new brand. Yet, is this view true? As is illustrated herein, histories of TSM which treat it as merely an old product under a new name misunderstand its essential architecture. As an expressly economic transformation, modern translational approaches (...)
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  23.  5
    Reproduction Versus Metamorphosis: Hegel and the Evolutionary Thinking of His Time.Márcio Suzuki - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-22.
    Several problems with Hegel’s conception of the organism in the Encyclopaedia are due to the separation between individual life in Nature and the universal life of the Concept. This discontinuity between ontogenesis and phylogenesis in his dialectics of organic life will be studied here by following his presentation of physiological development, especially reproduction, and by reconstructing the historical model he criticizes—Leibniz’s organic machines and their development in Buffon’s Natural History—a model that was also of crucial importance to the philosophy of (...)
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  24.  3
    Theoretical Virtues in Eighteenth-Century Debates on Animal Cognition.Hein van den Berg - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-35.
    Within eighteenth-century debates on animal cognition we can distinguish at least three main theoretical positions: (i) Buffon’s mechanism, (ii) Reimarus’ theory of instincts, and (iii) the sensationalism of Condillac and Leroy. In this paper, I adopt a philosophical perspective on this debate and argue that in order to fully understand the justification Buffon, Reimarus, Condillac, and Leroy gave for their respective theories, we must pay special attention to the theoretical virtues these naturalists alluded to while justifying their position. These theoretical (...)
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  25.  3
    Not Only Laboratory to Clinic: The Translational Work of William S. C. Copeman in Rheumatology.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-27.
    Since the arrival of Translational Medicine, as both a term and movement in the late 1990s, it has been associated almost exclusively with attempts to accelerate the “translation” of research-laboratory findings to improve efficacy and outcomes in clinical practice. This framing privileges one source of change in medicine, that from bench-to-bedside. In this article we dig into the history of translation research to identify and discuss three other types of translational work in medicine that can also reshape ideas, practices, institutions, (...)
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  26.  3
    Manipulative Evidence and Medical Interventions: Some Qualifications.Raffaella Campaner & Matteo Cerri - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-15.
    The notion of causal evidence in medicine has been the subject of wide philosophical debate in recent years. The notion of evidence has been discussed mostly in connection with Evidence Based Medicine and, more in general, with the assessment of causal nexus in medical, and especially research contexts. “Manipulative evidence” is one of the notions of causal evidence that has stimulated much debate. It has been defined in slightly different ways, attributed different relevance, and recently placed at the core of (...)
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  27.  10
    Making Sense of Nature Conservation After the End of Nature.Elena Casetta - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-23.
    The concept of nature in Western thought has been informed by the assumption of a categorical distinction between natural and artificial entities, which goes back to John Stuart Mill or even Aristotle. Such a way of articulating the natural/artificial distinction has proven unfit for conservation purposes mainly because of the extent and the pervasiveness of human activities that would leave no nature left to be conserved, and alternative views have been advanced. In this contribution, after arguing for the importance of (...)
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  28.  8
    oren harman and michael r. dietrich (eds). Dreamers, Visionaries, and Revolutionaries in the Life Sciences. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018, 336 pp. [REVIEW]Adrian Currie - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-3.
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  29.  7
    Neither Superorganisms nor Mere Species Aggregates: Charles Elton’s Sociological Analogies and His Moderate Holism About Ecological Communities.Antoine C. Dussault - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-27.
    This paper analyzes community ecologist Charles Elton’s ideas on animal communities, and situates them with respect to the classical opposition between organicist–holistic and individualistic–reductionist ecological views drawn by many historians of ecology. It is argued that Elton espoused a moderate ecological holism, which drew a middle way between the stricter ecological holism advocated by organicist ecologists and the merely aggregationist views advocated by some of their opponents. It is also argued that Elton’s moderate ecological holism resonated with his preference for (...)
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  30.  4
    Fish and Fishpond. An Ecological Reading of G.W. Leibniz’s Monadology §§ 63–70.Miguel Escribano-Cabeza - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-18.
    One of Leibniz’s most original ideas is his conception of the living individual as a hierarchical network of living beings whose relationships are essential to the proper functioning of its organic body. This idea is also valid to explain any existing order in nature that depends on the set of relationships of living beings that inhabit it. Both ideas are present in the conception of the natural world that Leibniz presents in his Monadology through his idea of biological infinitism. According (...)
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  31.  9
    Ontologically Simple Theories Do Not Indicate the True Nature of Complex Biological Systems: Three Test Cases.Michael Fry - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-44.
    A longstanding philosophical premise perceives simplicity as a desirable attribute of scientific theories. One of several raised justifications for this notion is that simple theories are more likely to indicate the true makeup of natural systems. Qualitatively parsimonious hypotheses and theories keep to a minimum the number of different postulated entities within a system. Formulation of such ontologically simple working hypotheses proved to be useful in the experimental probing of narrowly defined bio systems. It is less certain, however, whether qualitatively (...)
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  32.  3
    The Art of Growing Old: Environmental Manipulation, Physiological Rhythms, and the Advent of Microcebus Murinus as a Primate Model of Aging.Lucie Gerber - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-29.
    In the early 1990s, Microcebus murinus, a small primate endemic to Madagascar, emerged as a potential animal model for the study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease. This paper traces the use of the lesser mouse lemur in research on aging and associated neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on a basic material precondition that made this possible, namely, the conversion of a wild animal into an experimental organism that lives, breeds, and survives in the laboratory. It argues that the “old” mouse lemur model (...)
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  33.  18
    Cecilia Heyes, Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking, Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2018, Ix + 292 Pp., $31.50/£25.95/€28.50. [REVIEW]Ivan Gonzalez-Cabrera - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-5.
    Heyes’ book is an essential addition to the literature on human uniqueness. Her main claim is that the key human cognitive capacities are products of cultural rather than genetic evolution. Among these distinctively human capacities are causal understanding, episodic memory, imitation, mindreading, and normative thinking. According to Heyes, they emerged not by genetic mutation but by innovations in cognitive development. She calls these mechanisms ‘cognitive gadgets.’ This is perhaps one of the best and most comprehensive views of human cognitive evolution (...)
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  34.  3
    Thomas Heams, Infravies – Le vivant sans frontières, Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 2019, 192 pp, 20.00 €. [REVIEW]Cyrille Jeancolas - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-5.
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  35.  6
    The Myth of Frederic Clements’s Mutualistic Organicism, Or: On the Necessity to Distinguish Different Concepts of Organicism.Thomas Kirchhoff - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-27.
    In the theory and history of ecology, Frederic Clements’s theory of plant communities is usually presented as the historical prototype and a paradigmatic example of synecological organicism, characterised by the assumption that ecological communities are functionally integrated units of mutually dependent species. In this paper, I will object to this standard interpretation of Clements’s theory. Undoubtedly, Clements compares plant communities with organisms and calls them “complex organisms” and “superorganisms”. Further, he can indeed be regarded as a proponent of ecological organicism—provided (...)
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  36.  4
    Soviet Genetics and the Communist Party: Was It All Bad and Wrong, or None at All?Mikhail Konashev - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-19.
    The history of genetics and the evolutionary theory in the USSR is multidimensional. Only in the 1920s after the October Revolution, and due in large part to that Revolution, the science of genetics arose in Soviet Russia. Genetics was limited, but not obliterated in the second half of the 1950s, and was restored in the late 1960s, after the resignation of Nikita S. Khrushchev. In the subsequent period, Soviet genetics experienced a resurgence, though one not as successful as geneticists would (...)
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  37.  4
    S Tephanie E Lizabeth M Ohr, First in Fly. Drosophila Research and Biological Discovery, Cambridge/London: Harvard University Press, 2018, 272 Pp., £28.95. [REVIEW]Alice Laciny - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-3.
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  38.  2
    J an B aedke, Above the Gene, Beyond Biology: Towards a Philosophy of Epigenetics, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018, 313 pages. [REVIEW]Gaëlle Pontarotti & Arantza Etxeberria - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-4.
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  39.  4
    Human domestication and the roles of human agency in human evolution.Lorenzo Del Savio & Matteo Mameli - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-25.
    Are humans a domesticated species? How is this issue related to debates on the roles of human agency in human evolution? This article discusses four views on human domestication: Darwin’s view; the view of those who link human domestication to anthropogenic niche construction and, more specifically, to sedentism; the view of those who link human domestication to selection against aggression and the domestication syndrome; and a novel view according to which human domestication can be conceived of in terms of a (...)
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  40.  9
    Skin Color and Phlogiston Immanuel Kant’s Racism in Context.Joris van Gorkom - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-22.
    Although much attention has already been paid to Kant’s ideas on race, more research is needed to determine the sources that he used to support his portrayal of non-white races. A comprehension of the intellectual context gives us the opportunity to see the way in which Kant wished to contribute to discussions on inheritable human characteristics and the inferiority of certain races. This article will emphasize the relevance of the views of Joseph Priestley and Alexander Wilson for Kant’s hypothesis on (...)
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  41.  1
    R Ichard O. P Rum, The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin’s Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World — and Us, New York: Doubleday, 2017, 448 Pp., $30.00 Hardback. [REVIEW]Jan Verpooten - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (2):1-5.
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  42.  1
    Biological accuracy in large-scale brain simulations.Edoardo Datteri - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-22.
    The advancement of computing technology makes it possible to build extremely accurate digital reconstructions of brain circuits. Are such unprecedented levels of biological accuracy essential for brain simulations to play the roles they are expected to play in neuroscientific research? The main goal of this paper is to clarify this question by distinguishing between various roles played by large-scale simulations in contemporary neuroscience, and by reflecting about what makes a simulation biologically accurate. It is argued that large-scale simulations may play (...)
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  43.  4
    Jörg Pittelkow, Innovation und Tradition. Herbert Bachs Beitrag zur Anthropologie und Humangenetik, ed. by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geschichte und Theorie der Biologie , Göttingen: Universitätsverlag Göttingen, 2018, 370 pp., 29,00 €. [REVIEW]Pascal Germann - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-4.
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  44.  2
    Introduction: Blood/Food/Climate—Physiology/Nation/Race.Vanessa Heggie - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-5.
    This is an introduction to a series of essays, originally a panel at the iCHST conference in 2017, which explore the moral economy of physiology in the modern period, focusing particularly on issues of race, place and nation. By examining a series of interconnected, but not interchangeable, concepts, these papers offer a broader context for the understanding of physiology, physical anthropology, and fertility studies, particularly by moving from Europe to South America and from there with explorers and scientists across the (...)
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  45.  7
    Assumptions of authority: the story of Sue the T - rex and controversy over access to fossils.Elizabeth D. Jones - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-27.
    Although the buying, selling, and trading of fossils has been a principle part of paleontological practice over the centuries, the commercial collection of fossils today has re-emerged into a pervasive and lucrative industry. In the United States, the number of commercial companies driving the legal, and sometimes illegal, selling of fossils is estimated to have doubled since the 1980s, and worries from academic paleontologists over this issue has increased accordingly. Indeed, some view the commercialization of fossils as one of the (...)
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  46.  2
    E Ugene E Arshaw -W Hyte, Modelling Evolution: A New Dynamic Account, New York: Routledge, 2018, 145 Pp, £105.00. [REVIEW]Kostas Kampourakis - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):7.
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  47.  9
    Otávio Bueno, Ruey-Lin Chen, & Melinda Bonnie Fagan , Individuation, Process, and Scientific Practice, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2018, x + 308 pp. [REVIEW]Alison K. McConwell - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-4.
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  48.  2
    T Hierry H Oquet, Revisiting the Origin of Species: The Other Darwins. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, Xi + 240 Pp., $140. [REVIEW]Greg Priest - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-4.
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  49.  3
    S Amir O Kasha, Agents and Goals in Evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 254 Pp., $40.00. [REVIEW]Adrian Stencel - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):6.
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    Coordinating Dissent as an Alternative to Consensus Classification: Insights From Systematics for Bio-Ontologies.Beckett Sterner, Joeri Witteveen & Nico Franz - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-25.
    The collection and classification of data into meaningful categories is a key step in the process of knowledge making. In the life sciences, the design of data discovery and integration tools has relied on the premise that a formal classificatory system for expressing a body of data should be grounded in consensus definitions for classifications. On this approach, exemplified by the realist program of the Open Biomedical Ontologies Foundry, progress is maximized by grounding the representation and aggregation of data on (...)
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  51.  55
    The stability of traits conception of the hologenome: An evolutionary account of holobiont individuality.Javier Suárez - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-27.
    Bourrat and Griffiths :33, 2018) have recently argued that most of the evidence presented by holobiont defenders to support the thesis that holobionts are evolutionary individuals is not to the point and is not even adequate to discriminate multispecies evolutionary individuals from other multispecies assemblages that would not be considered evolutionary individuals by most holobiont defenders. They further argue that an adequate criterion to distinguish the two categories is fitness alignment, presenting the notion of fitness boundedness as a criterion that (...)
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  52.  1
    Correction to: Special issue—before translational medicine: laboratory clinic relations lost in translation? Cortisone and the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Britain, 1950–1960.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (1):1-1.
    The above-mentioned article has been published online on 7 November 2019 as part of topical collection ‘Before Translational Medicine: Laboratory Clinic Relations’.
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