Year:

  1.  3
    “Other minds than ours”: a controversial discussion on the limits and possibilities of comparative psychology in the light of C. Lloyd Morgan’s work.Martin Böhnert & Christopher Hilbert - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):44.
    C. Lloyd Morgan is mostly known for Morgan’s canon, still a popular and frequently quoted principle in comparative psychology and ethology. There has been a fair amount of debate on the canon’s interpretation, function, and value regarding the research on animal minds, usually referring to it as an isolated principle. In this paper we rather shed light on Morgan’s overall scientific program and his vision for comparative psychology. We argue that within his program Morgan identified crucial conceptual, ontological, and methodical (...)
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  2.  1
    G rant R amsey and C harles H. P ence , Chance in Evolution, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2016, 384 pp., $45. [REVIEW]Thomas Bonnin - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):52.
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  3. S ophia R oosth, Synthetic: How Life Got Made, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2017, 256 pp, $35. [REVIEW]Thomas Bonnin - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):53.
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  4.  1
    A non-metaphysical evaluation of vitalism in the early twentieth century.Bohang Chen - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):50.
    In biology the term “vitalism” is usually associated with Hans Driesch’s doctrine of the entelechy: entelechies were nonmaterial, bio-specific agents responsible for governing a few peculiar biological phenomena. Since vitalism defined as such violates metaphysical materialism, the received view refutes the doctrine of the entelechy as a metaphysical heresy. But in the early twentieth century, a different, non-metaphysical evaluation of vitalism was endorsed by some biologists and philosophers, which finally led to a logical refutation of the doctrine of the entelechy. (...)
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  5.  2
    Fernando Vidal and francisco Ortega, being brains: Making the cerebral subject, new York, fordham university press, 2017, 320 pp., $60 hardcover /£46.00. [REVIEW]Giovanna Colombetti - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):47.
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  6.  1
    M arc J. R atcliff, Genèse d’une Découverte: La Division des Infusoires , Paris: Publication scientifiques du Museum national d’histoire naturelle, 2016, 751 pp., 45 €. [REVIEW]Sébastien Dutreuil - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):46.
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  7.  6
    P eter G odfrey -S mith, Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life, London: William Collins, 2017, x + 255 pp., £20.00 , ISBN 978-0-00-822627-5. [REVIEW]Flavia Fabris - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):58.
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  8.  4
    S abina L eonelli, Data - centric biology: a philosophical study, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2016, 275 pp., $35/24.5. [REVIEW]Pierre-Luc Germain - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):57.
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  9.  4
    The instability of field experiments: building an experimental research tradition on the rocky seashores.Jean-Baptiste Grodwohl, Franco Porto & Charbel N. El-Hani - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):45.
    In many experimental sciences, like particle physics or molecular biology, the proper place for establishing facts is the laboratory. In the sciences of population biology, however, the laboratory is often seen as a poor approximation of what occurs in nature. Results obtained in the field are usually more convincing. This raises special problems: it is much more difficult to obtain stable, repeatable results in the field, where environmental conditions vary out of the experimenter’s control, than in the laboratory. We examine (...)
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  10. Entangled histories of plague ecology in Russia and the USSR.Susan D. Jones & Anna A. Amramina - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):49.
    During the mid-twentieth century, Soviet scientists developed the “natural focus” theory–practice framework to explain outbreaks of diseases endemic to wild animals and transmitted to humans. Focusing on parasitologist-physician Evgeny N. Pavlovsky and other field scientists’ work in the Soviet borderlands, this article explores how the natural focus framework’s concepts and practices were entangled in political as well as material ecologies of knowledge and practice. We argue that the very definition of endemic plague incorporated both hands-on materialist experience and ideological concepts (...)
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  11.  3
    The production of a physiological puzzle: how Cytisus adami confused and inspired a century’s botanists, gardeners, and evolutionists.John Lidwell-Durnin - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):48.
    ‘Adam’s laburnum’, produced by accident in 1825 by Jean-Louis Adam, a nurseryman in Vitry, became a commercial success within the plant trade for its striking mix of yellow and purple flowers. After it came to the attention of members of La Société d’Horticulture de Paris, the tree gained enormous fame as a potential instance of the much sought-after ‘graft hybrid’, a hypothetical idea that by grafting one plant onto another, a mixture of the two could be produced. As I show (...)
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  12.  3
    Philosophy of nature and organism’s autonomy: on Hegel, Plessner and Jonas’ theories of living beings.Francesca Michelini, Matthias Wunsch & Dirk Stederoth - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):56.
    Following the revival in the last decades of the concept of “organism”, scholarly literature in philosophy of science has shown growing historical interest in the theory of Immanuel Kant, one of the “fathers” of the concept of self-organisation. Yet some recent theoretical developments suggest that self-organisation alone cannot fully account for the all-important dimension of autonomy of the living. Autonomy appears to also have a genuine “interactive” dimension, which concerns the organism’s functional interactions with the environment and does not simply (...)
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  13.  24
    The Search of “Canonical” Explanations for the Cerebral Cortex.Alessio Plebe - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):40.
    This paper addresses a fundamental line of research in neuroscience: the identification of a putative neural processing core of the cerebral cortex, often claimed to be “canonical”. This “canonical” core would be shared by the entire cortex, and would explain why it is so powerful and diversified in tasks and functions, yet so uniform in architecture. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the search for canonical explanations over the past 40 years, discussing the theoretical frameworks informing this research. (...)
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  14. D enis N oble, Dance to the Tune of Life — Biological Relativity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, December 2016, 302 pp., £ 17.99. [REVIEW]Emanuele Ratti - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):54.
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  15.  5
    Correction to: Theoricity, observation and homology: a response to Pearson.Ariel Jonathan Roffé, Santiago Ginnobili & Daniel Blanco - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):43.
    Due to an unfortunate turn of events, the family name of the first author was erroneously published as ‘RoffÕ’ in the original publication. The correct representation of the first author’s family name is listed above and below.
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  16.  12
    Theoricity, observation and homology: a response to Pearson.Ariel Jonathan Roffé, Santiago Ginnobili & Daniel Blanco - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):42.
    An interesting metatheoretical controversy took place during the 1980’s and 1990’s between pattern and phylogenetic cladists. What was always at stake in the discussion was not how work in systematics should be carried out, but rather how this practice should be metatheoretically interpreted. In this article, we criticize Pearson’s account of the metatheoretical factors at play in this discussion. Following him, we focus on the issue of circularity, and on the role that phylogenetic hypotheses play in the determination of “primary (...)
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  17.  1
    On the historical significance of Beijerinck and his contagium vivum fluidum for modern virology.Neeraja Sankaran - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):41.
    This paper considers the foundational role of the contagium vivum fluidum—first proposed by the Dutch microbiologist Martinus Beijerinck in 1898—in the history of virology, particularly in shaping the modern virus concept, defined in the 1950s. Investigating the cause of mosaic disease of tobacco, previously shown to be an invisible and filterable entity, Beijerinck concluded that it was neither particulate like the bacteria implicated in certain infectious diseases, nor soluble like the toxins and enzymes responsible for symptoms in others. He offered (...)
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  18.  3
    Possibilities and limitations of three-dimensional reconstruction and simulation techniques to identify patterns, rhythms and functions of apoptosis in the early developing neural tube.Stefan Washausen, Thomas Scheffel, Guido Brunnett & Wolfgang Knabe - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):55.
    The now classical idea that programmed cell death contributes to a plethora of developmental processes still has lost nothing of its impact. It is, therefore, important to establish effective three-dimensional reconstruction as well as simulation techniques to decipher the exact patterns and functions of such apoptotic events. The present study focuses on the question whether and how apoptosis promotes neurulation-associated processes in the spinal cord of Tupaia belangeri. Our 3D reconstructions demonstrate that at least two craniocaudal waves of apoptosis consecutively (...)
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  19. Lynn Hankinson Nelson, Biology and Feminism: A Philosophical Introduction, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017, x + 251 pp., $30.86/£21.99. [REVIEW]Sara Weaver - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):51.
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  20.  2
    Model and movement: studying cell movement in early morphogenesis, 1900 to the present.Janina Wellmann - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):59.
    Morphogenesis is one of the fundamental processes of developing life. Gastrulation, especially, marks a period of major translocations and bustling rearrangements of cells that give rise to the three germ layers. It was also one of the earliest fields in biology where cell movement and behaviour in living specimens were investigated. This article examines scientific attempts to understand gastrulation from the point of view of cells in motion. It argues that the study of morphogenesis in the twentieth century faced a (...)
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  21.  9
    Bringing Darwin into the social sciences and the humanities: cultural evolution and its philosophical implications.Stefaan Blancke & Gilles Denis - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):29.
    In the field of cultural evolution it is generally assumed that the study of culture and cultural change would benefit enormously from being informed by evolutionary thinking. Recently, however, there has been much debate about what this “being informed” means. According to the standard view, an interesting analogy obtains between cultural and biological evolution. In the literature, however, the analogy is interpreted and used in at least three distinct, but interrelated ways. We provide a taxonomy in order to clarify these (...)
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  22.  10
    Multispecies individuals.Pierrick Bourrat & Paul E. Griffiths - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):33.
    We assess the arguments for recognising functionally integrated multispecies consortia as genuine biological individuals, including cases of so-called ‘holobionts’. We provide two examples in which the same core biochemical processes that sustain life are distributed across a consortium of individuals of different species. Although the same chemistry features in both examples, proponents of the holobiont as unit of evolution would recognize one of the two cases as a multispecies individual whilst they would consider the other as a compelling case of (...)
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  23.  3
    Introduction to “Working Across Species”.Rachel Mason Dentinger & Abigail Woods - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):30.
    Comparison between different animal species is omnipresent in the history of science and medicine but rarely subject to focussed historical analysis. The articles in the “Working Across Species” topical collection address this deficit by looking directly at the practical and epistemic work of cross-species comparison. Drawn from papers presented at a Wellcome-Trust-funded workshop in 2016, these papers investigate various ways that comparison has been made persuasive and successful, in multiple locations, by diverse disciplines, over the course of two centuries. They (...)
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  24.  1
    Thomas Hunt Morgan and the invisible gene: the right tool for the job.Giulia Frezza & Mauro Capocci - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):31.
    The paper analyzes the early theory building process of Thomas Hunt Morgan from the 1910s to the 1930s and the introduction of the invisible gene as a main explanatory unit of heredity. Morgan’s work marks the transition between two different styles of thought. In the early 1900s, he shifted from an embryological study of the development of the organism to a study of the mechanism of genetic inheritance and gene action. According to his contemporaries as well as to historiography, Morgan (...)
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  25.  2
    Predictive Hypotheses Are Ineffectual in Resolving Complex Biochemical Systems.Michael Fry - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):25.
    Scientific hypotheses may either predict particular unknown facts or accommodate previously-known data. Although affirmed predictions are intuitively more rewarding than accommodations of established facts, opinions divide whether predictive hypotheses are also epistemically superior to accommodation hypotheses. This paper examines the contribution of predictive hypotheses to discoveries of several bio-molecular systems. Having all the necessary elements of the system known beforehand, an abstract predictive hypothesis of semiconservative mode of DNA replication was successfully affirmed. However, in defining the genetic code whose biochemical (...)
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  26.  8
    Retraction Note To: Diverging Views of Epigenesis: The Wolff–Blumenbach Debate.Andrea Gambarotto - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):38.
    The author has retracted this article as it contains sections that substantially overlap with the following publications.
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  27.  4
    The evolution of morality and its rollback.Brian Garvey - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):26.
    According to most Evolutionary Psychologists, human moral attitudes are rooted in cognitive modules that evolved in the Stone Age to solve problems of social interaction. A crucial component of their view is that such cognitive modules remain unchanged since the Stone Age, and I question that here. I appeal to evolutionary rollback, the phenomenon where an organ becomes non-functional and eventually atrophies or disappears—e.g. cave-dwelling fish losing their eyes. I argue that even if cognitive modules evolved in the Stone Age (...)
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  28.  11
    Was Aristotle the ‘Father’ of the Epigenesis Doctrine?Ina Goy - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):28.
    Was Aristotle the ‘father’ and founder of the epigenesis doctrine? Historically, I will argue, this question must be answered with ‘no’. Aristotle did not initiate and had no access to a debate that described itself in terms of ‘epigenesis’ and ‘preformation’, and thus cannot be considered the ‘father’ or founder of the epigenesis-preformation controversy in a literal sense. But many ancient accounts of reproduction and embryological development contain analogies to what early modern scientist called ‘epigenesis’ and ‘preformation’, and, in this (...)
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  29.  1
    G Ottfried B Rem , 150 Jahre Mendelsche Regeln: Vom Erbsenzählen Zum Gen-Editieren. [REVIEW]Kersten Hall - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):35.
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  30.  8
    D Erek M. J Ones, The Biological Foundations of Action. [REVIEW]Anne Sophie Meincke - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):36.
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  31.  8
    M Ichael F Ry, Landmark Experiments in Molecular Biology.Michel Morange - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):39.
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  32.  2
    A Lfred I. T Auber, Immunity: The Evolution of an Idea, Oxford University Press, 2017, Xx + 303 Pp., $72.21. [REVIEW]Neeraja Sankaran - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):32.
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  33.  1
    S Nait B. G Issis, E Hud L Amm, and A Yelet S Havit : Landscapes of Collectivity in the Life Sciences. [REVIEW]Javier Suárez - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):37.
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  34.  2
    L Uis A. C Ampos, Radium and the Secret of Life. [REVIEW]Laurel Waycott - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):34.
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  35.  3
    Phenylbutazone : one drug across two species.Michael Worboys & Elizabeth Toon - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):27.
    In this article we explore the different trajectories of this one drug, phenylbutazone, across two species, humans and horses in the period 1950–2000. The essay begins by following the introduction of the drug into human medicine in the early 1950s. It promised to be a less costly alternative to cortisone, one of the “wonder drugs” of the era, in the treatment of rheumatic conditions. Both drugs appeared to offer symptomatic relief rather than a cure, and did so with the risk (...)
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  36.  10
    Stochasticity in Cultural Evolution: A Revolution yet to Happen.Sylvain Billiard & Alexandra Alvergne - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):9.
    Over the last 40 years or so, there has been an explosion of cultural evolution research in anthropology and archaeology. In each discipline, cultural evolutionists investigate how interactions between individuals translate into group level patterns, with the aim of explaining the diachronic dynamics and diversity of cultural traits. However, while much attention has been given to deterministic processes, we contend that current evolutionary accounts of cultural change are limited because they do not adopt a systematic stochastic approach. First, we show (...)
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  37.  8
    An orangutan in Paris: pondering Proximity at the Muséum d’histoire naturelle in 1836.Richard W. Burkhardt - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):20.
    When the Muséum d’histoire naturelle in Paris learned in 1836 that it had the chance to buy a live, young orangutan, it was excited by the prospect. Specimens were the focus of the Museum’s activities, and this particular specimen seemed especially promising, not only because the Museum had very few orangutan specimens in its collection, but also because of what was perceived to be the orangutan’s unique place in the natural order of things, namely, at the very boundary between the (...)
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  38.  1
    Translational neonatology research: transformative encounters across species and disciplines.Mie S. Dam, Per T. Sangild & Mette N. Svendsen - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):21.
    This paper explores the laborious and intimate work of turning bodies of research animals into models of human patients. Based on ethnographic research in the interdisciplinary Danish research centre NEOMUNE, we investigate collaboration across species and disciplines, in research aiming at improving survival for preterm infants. NEOMUNE experimental studies on piglets evolved as a platform on which both basic and clinical scientists exercised professional authority. Guided by the field of multi-species research, we explore the social and material agency of research (...)
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  39.  7
    The sociobiology of genes: the gene’s eye view as a unifying behavioural-ecological framework for biological evolution.Alexis De Tiège, Yves Van de Peer, Johan Braeckman & Koen B. Tanghe - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):6.
    Although classical evolutionary theory, i.e., population genetics and the Modern Synthesis, was already implicitly ‘gene-centred’, the organism was, in practice, still generally regarded as the individual unit of which a population is composed. The gene-centred approach to evolution only reached a logical conclusion with the advent of the gene-selectionist or gene’s eye view in the 1960s and 1970s. Whereas classical evolutionary theory can only work with fitness differences between individual organisms, gene-selectionism is capable of working with fitness differences among genes (...)
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  40.  3
    S tephen H ilgartner, Reordering Life: Knowledge and Control in the Genomics Revolution, Cambridge Massachusetts, The MIT Press, 2017, xiv + 343 pp., May 2017, $35.00/£27.95. [REVIEW]James W. E. Lowe - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):5.
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  41.  4
    Epigenesis by experience: Romantic empiricism and non-Kantian biology.Amanda Jo Goldstein - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):13.
    Reconstructions of Romantic-era life science in general, and epigenesis in particular, frequently take the Kantian logic of autotelic “self-organization” as their primary reference point. I argue in this essay that the Kantian conceptual rubric hinders our historical and theoretical understanding of epigenesis, Romantic and otherwise. Neither a neutral gloss on epigenesis, nor separable from the epistemological deflation of biological knowledge that has received intensive scrutiny in the history and philosophy of science, Kant’s heuristics of autonomous “self-organization” in the third Critique (...)
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  42.  5
    From lighthouse to hothouse: hospital hygiene, antibiotics and the evolution of infectious disease, 1950–1990.Christoph Gradmann - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):8.
    Upon entering clinical medicine in the 1940s, antibiotic therapy seemed to complete a transformation of hospitals that originated in the late nineteenth century. Former death sinks had become harbingers of therapeutic progress. Yet this triumph was short-lived. The arrival of pathologies caused by resistant bacteria, and of nosocomial infections whose spread was helped by antibiotic therapies, seemed to be intimately related to modern anti-infective therapy. The place where such problems culminated were hospitals, which increasingly appeared as dangerous environments where attempts (...)
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  43.  2
    Continuous culture techniques as simulators for standard cells: Jacques Monod’s, Aron Novick’s and Leo Szilard’s quantitative approach to microbiology.Gabriele Gramelsberger - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):23.
    Continuous culture techniques were developed in the early twentieth century to replace cumbersome studies of cell growth in batch cultures. In contrast to batch cultures, they constituted an open concept, as cells are forced to proliferate by adding new medium while cell suspension is constantly removed. During the 1940s and 1950s new devices have been designed—called “automatic syringe mechanism,” “turbidostat,” “chemostat,” “bactogen,” and “microbial auxanometer”—which allowed increasingly accurate quantitative measurements of bacterial growth. With these devices cell growth came under the (...)
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  44.  5
    Petri dish versus Winogradsky column: a longue durée perspective on purity and diversity in microbiology, 1880s–1980s.Mathias Grote - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):11.
    Microbial diversity has become a leitmotiv of contemporary microbiology, as epitomized in the concept of the microbiome, with significant consequences for the classification of microbes. In this paper, I contrast microbiology’s current diversity ideal with its influential predecessor in the twentieth century, that of purity, as epitomized in Robert Koch’s bacteriological culture methods. Purity and diversity, the two polar opposites with regard to making sense of the microbial world, have been operationalized in microbiological practice by tools such as the “clean” (...)
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  45.  4
    The diving reflex and asphyxia: working across species in physiological ecology.Joel B. Hagen - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):18.
    Beginning in the mid-1930s the comparative physiologists Laurence Irving and Per Fredrik Scholander pioneered the study of diving mammals, particularly harbor seals. Although resting on earlier work dating back to the late nineteenth century, their research was distinctive in several ways. In contrast to medically oriented physiology, the approaches of Irving and Scholander were strongly influenced by natural history, zoology, ecology, and evolutionary biology. Diving mammals, they argued, shared the cardiopulmonary physiology of terrestrial mammals, but evolution had modified these basic (...)
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  46.  5
    Crafting socialist embryology: dialectics, aquaculture and the diverging discipline in Maoist China, 1950–1965.Lijing Jiang - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):3.
    In the 1950s, embryology in socialist China underwent a series of changes that adjusted the disciplinary apparatus to suit socialism and the national goal of self-reliance. As the Communist state called on scientists to learn from the Soviets, embryologists’ comprehensive view on heredity, which did not contradict Trofim Lysenko ’s doctrines, provided a space for them to advance their discipline. Leading scientists, often trained abroad in the tradition of experimental embryology, rode on the tides of Maoist ideology and repositioned their (...)
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  47.  18
    Robot life: simulation and participation in the study of evolution and social behavior.Christopher M. Kelty - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):16.
    This paper explores the case of using robots to simulate evolution, in particular the case of Hamilton’s Law. The uses of robots raises several questions that this paper seeks to address. The first concerns the role of the robots in biological research: do they simulate something or do they participate in something? The second question concerns the physicality of the robots: what difference does embodiment make to the role of the robot in these experiments. Thirdly, how do life, embodiment and (...)
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  48.  10
    History as a Biomedical Matter: Recent Reassessments of the First Cases of Alzheimer’s Disease.Lara Keuck - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):10.
    This paper examines medical scientists’ accounts of their rediscoveries and reassessments of old materials. It looks at how historical patient files and brain samples of the first cases of Alzheimer’s disease became reused as scientific objects of inquiry in the 1990s, when a genetic neuropathologist from Munich and a psychiatrist from Frankfurt lead searches for left-overs of Alzheimer’s ‘founder cases’ from the 1900s. How and why did these researchers use historical methods, materials and narratives, and why did the biomedical community (...)
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  49.  12
    Working across species down on the farm: Howard S. Liddell and the development of comparative psychopathology, c. 1923–1962.Robert G. W. Kirk & Edmund Ramsden - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):24.
    Seeking a scientific basis for understanding and treating mental illness, and inspired by the work of Ivan Pavlov, American physiologists, psychiatrists and psychologists in the 1920s turned to nonhuman animals. This paper examines how new constructs such as “experimental neurosis” emerged as tools to enable psychiatric comparison across species. From 1923 to 1962, the Cornell “Behavior Farm” was a leading interdisciplinary research center pioneering novel techniques to experimentally study nonhuman psychopathology. Led by the psychobiologist Howard Liddell, work at the Behavior (...)
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  50.  5
    Paleoanthropology’s uses of the bipedal criterion.Mathilde Lequin - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):7.
    Bipedalism is one of the criteria that paleoanthropologists use in order to interpret the fossil record and to determine if a specimen belongs to the human lineage. In the context of such interpretations, bipedalism is considered to be a unique characteristic of this lineage that also marks its origin. This conception has largely remained unchallenged over the last decades, in spite of fossil discoveries that led to the emergence of bipedalism in the human lineage being shifted back by several millions (...)
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  51.  4
    Radium, biophysics, and radiobiology: tracing the history of radiobiology in twentieth-century China.Christine Yi Lai Luk - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):2.
    Radiobiology assesses the biological hazards of exposure to radioactive substances and nuclear radiation. This article explores the history of radiobiology in twentieth-century China by examining the overlapping of radium research and biophysics, from roughly the 1920s Nationalist period to the 1960s Communist period; from the foreign purchase of radium by the Rockefeller Foundation’s China Medical Board during the Republican era, to the institutional establishment of radiobiology as a subset of biophysics in the People’s Republic. Western historiography of radiobiology highlights the (...)
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  52.  7
    Modeling complexity: cognitive constraints and computational model-building in integrative systems biology.Miles MacLeod & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):17.
    Modern integrative systems biology defines itself by the complexity of the problems it takes on through computational modeling and simulation. However in integrative systems biology computers do not solve problems alone. Problem solving depends as ever on human cognitive resources. Current philosophical accounts hint at their importance, but it remains to be understood what roles human cognition plays in computational modeling. In this paper we focus on practices through which modelers in systems biology use computational simulation and other tools to (...)
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  53.  4
    Reconstructing an incomparable organism: the Chalicothere in nineteenth and early-twentieth century palaeontology.Chris Manias - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):22.
    Palaeontology developed as a field dependent upon comparison. Not only did reconstructing the fragmentary records of fossil organisms and placing them within taxonomic systems and evolutionary lineages require detailed anatomical comparisons with living and fossil animals, but the field also required thinking in terms of behavioural, biological and ecological analogies with modern organisms to understand how prehistoric animals lived and behaved. Yet palaeontological material often worked against making easy linkages, bringing a sense of mystery and doubt. This paper will look (...)
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  54.  7
    New perspectives in the history of twentieth-century life sciences: historical, historiographical and epistemological themes.Robert Meunier & Kärin Nickelsen - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):19.
    The history of twentieth-century life sciences is not exactly a new topic. However, in view of the increasingly rapid development of the life sciences themselves over the past decades, some of the well-established narratives are worth revisiting. Taking stock of where we stand on these issues was the aim of a conference in 2015, entitled “Perspectives for the History of Life Sciences”. The papers in this topical collection are based on work presented and discussed at and around this meeting. Just (...)
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  55.  12
    M arta B ertolaso, Philosophy of Cancer: A Dynamic and Relational View, Dordrecht: Springer, 2016, xv + 190 pp., £66.99. [REVIEW]Anya Plutynski - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):1.
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  56.  6
    Semiotic systems with duality of patterning and the issue of cultural replicators.Gerhard Schaden & Cédric Patin - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):4.
    Two major works in recent evolutionary biology have in different ways touched upon the issue of cultural replicators in language, namely Dawkins’ Selfish Gene and Maynard Smith and Szathmáry’s Major Transitions in Evolution. In the latter, the emergence of language is referred to as the last major transition in evolution, a claim we argue to be derived from a crucial property of language, called Duality of Patterning. Prima facie, this property makes natural language look like a structural equivalent to DNA, (...)
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  57.  4
    S teeves D emazeux and P atrick S ingy , The DSM - 5 in Perspective: Philosophical Reflections on the Psychiatric Babel, Dordrecht, Heidelberg, New York, London: Springer, 2015, Series: History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences, Vol. 10, 238 pp, £90. [REVIEW]Jonathan Sholl - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):15.
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  58.  1
    Correction to: Informing materials: drugs as tools for exploring cancer mechanisms and pathways.Etienne Vignola-Gagné, Peter Keating & Alberto Cambrosio - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):12.
    The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. Three entries are incorrect in the reference list. The corrected references are given below.
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  59.  11
    N atalia G. S ukhova & E rki T ammiksaar, Aleksandr Fedorovich Middendorf: K dvukhsotletiyu so dnia rozhdeniya [Alexander Theodor von Middendorff: On the Bicentenary of His Birthday], 2nd edition, revised and expanded, St. Petersburg: Nestor-Istoriya, 2015, 380 pp., price 300 roubles [In Russian]. [REVIEW]Maxim V. Vinarski & Tatiana I. Yusupova - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):14.
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