History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences

ISSNs: 0391-9714, 1742-6316

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  1.  3
    Locating hygienic medicine within the intellectual history of hygiene: cases of E. W. Lane and T. R. Allinson.Min Bae - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-25.
    Nineteenth century hygiene might be a confusing concept. On the one hand, the concept of hygiene was gradually becoming an important concept that was focused on cleanliness and used interchangeably with sanitation. On the other hand, the classical notions of hygiene rooted in the Hippocratic teachings remained influential. This study is about two attempts to newly theorise such a confusing concept of hygiene in the second half of the century by Edward. W. Lane and Thomas R. Allinson. Their works, standing (...)
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  2.  1
    Games and Genes: Human Diversity Meets Cytogenetics—Mexico 1968.Ana Barahona - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-24.
    The 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico included innovative practices and technological knowledge of human biology. The first time that cytogenetic techniques had been applied to athletes was in the 1966 European Athletics Championship in Budapest and used on Olympic athletes for the first time in Mexico in 1968. The Genetics and Human Biology Program was created for this purpose in 1966 in close collaboration with the Local Organizing Committee, by Mexican geneticists Alfonso León de Garay and Rodolfo Félix Estrada who (...)
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  3.  2
    “Batesonian Mendelism” and “Pearsonian biometry”: shedding new light on the controversy between William Bateson and Karl Pearson.Nicola Bertoldi - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-44.
    This paper contributes to the ongoing reassessment of the controversy between William Bateson and Karl Pearson by characterising what we call “Batesonian Mendelism” and “Pearsonian biometry” as coherent and competing scientific outlooks. Contrary to the thesis that such a controversy stemmed from diverging theoretical commitments on the nature of heredity and evolution, we argue that Pearson’s and Bateson’s alternative views on those processes ultimately relied on different appraisals of the methodological value of the statistical apparatus developed by Francis Galton. Accordingly, (...)
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  4. “Waking up” the sleeping metaphor of normality in connection to intersex or DSD: a scoping review of medical literature.Eva De Clercq, Georg Starke & Michael Rost - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-37.
    The aim of the study is to encourage a critical debate on the use of normality in the medical literature on DSD or intersex. For this purpose, a scoping review was conducted to identify and map the various ways in which “normal” is used in the medical literature on DSD between 2016 and 2020. We identified 75 studies, many of which were case studies highlighting rare cases of DSD, others, mainly retrospective observational studies, focused on improving diagnosis or treatment. The (...)
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  5.  12
    Technics and Signs: Anthropogenesis in Vygotsky, Leroi-Gourhan, and Stiegler.Chris Drain - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-26.
    This paper reconstructs L.S. Vygotsky’s account of anthropogenesis with respect to the work of anthropologist André Leroi-Gourhan and late philosopher Bernard Stiegler, situating Vygotsky as a forerunner to recent theories that posit cultural scaffolding and niche construction as the main drivers of human cognitive evolution. One might think there is an immediate affinity between Vygotsky and the techno-centric accounts of Leroi-Gourhan and Stiegler. Following Leroi-Gourhan, Stiegler argues that “technics” is the main driver in the anthropogenic development of “reflective consciousness.” Vygotsky (...)
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  6.  3
    Design Principles and Mechanistic Explanation.Wei Fang - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-23.
    In this essay I propose that what design principles in systems biology and systems neuroscience do is to present abstract characterizations of mechanisms, and thereby facilitate mechanistic explanation. To show this, one design principle in systems neuroscience, i.e., the multilayer perceptron, is examined. However, Braillard contends that design principles provide a sort of non-mechanistic explanation due to two related reasons: they are very general and describe non-causal dependence relationships. In response to this, I argue that, on the one hand, all (...)
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  7. Who is the Biological Patient? A New Gradational and Dynamic Model for One Health Medicine.Yael Friedman - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    One Health medicine aims to improve health by focusing on the relations between the health of humans, animals, and the environment. However, One Health does not provide a clear idea of these relations, which are still represented as conceptually separated and not as one health, as the name implies. Inspired by holobiont research, I suggest a new model and conceptual framework for One Health that expands the notion of the biological patient by providing a gradational and dynamic understanding of environments, (...)
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  8.  2
    Bruce S. Grant, Observing Evolution: Peppered Moths and the Discovery of Parallel Melanism. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021.Caleb Hazelwood - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-3.
  9. Do Heritable Immune Responses Extend Physiological Individuality?Sophie Juliane Veigl - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    AbstractImmunology and its philosophy are a primary source for thinking about biological individuality. Through its discriminatory function, the immune system is believed to delineate organism and environment within one generation, thus defining the physiological individual. Based on the paradigmatic instantiations of immune systems, immune interactions and, thus, the physiological individual are believed to last only for one generation. However, in recent years, transgenerationally persisting immune responses have been reported in several phyla, but the consequences for physiological individuality have not yet (...)
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  10.  18
    Attention: A Descriptive Taxonomy.Antonios Kaldas - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    The term attention has been used to mean so many different things that some have despaired of it being useful at all. This paper is devoted to bringing a modicum of order to the chaos through the time-honored device of categorization. The chief purpose of this paper is to introduce a comprehensive descriptive taxonomy of the nuanced ways the term attention may be employed. It is presented in table form, followed by elucidations and illustrations of each of its items. But (...)
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  11. Planer R. J. & Sterelny K., From Signal to Symbol: The Evolution of Language, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2021, Xx + 276 Pp. [REVIEW]Loïc Latouche-Simard - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
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  12. The failure of drug repurposing for COVID-19 as an effect of excessive hypothesis testing and weak mechanistic evidence.Mariusz Maziarz & Adrian Stencel - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-26.
    The current strategy of searching for an effective treatment for COVID-19 relies mainly on repurposing existing therapies developed to target other diseases. Conflicting results have emerged in regard to the efficacy of several tested compounds but later results were negative. The number of conducted and ongoing trials and the urgent need for a treatment pose the risk that false-positive results will be incorrectly interpreted as evidence for treatments’ efficacy and a ground for drug approval. Our purpose is twofold. First, we (...)
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  13. Parachutes, Randomized Controlled Trials, and All-Cause Mortality.Thomas Milovac - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    AbstractIn 2003 and 2018 researchers discussed the perils of blind reliance on randomized controlled trials that have been substituted for medical experience and clinical acumen. Although these past articles do well to shed light on this issue, they neglect to discuss the topic of all-cause mortality in controlled trials. The current essay seeks to fill this void and expand the thought put into the appropriateness of all-cause mortality, especially when trials extend excessively far into the future. To do this effectively (...)
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  14.  10
    Kant, intoxicated: the aesthetics of drunkenness, between moral duty and “active play”.Matthew Perkins-McVey - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-13.
    This article examines Kant’s overlooked concept of “active play,” as opposed to “free play,” in connection with the influence of the Brunonian system of medicine, both of which, I propose, are central to understanding the broader significance of intoxication in Kant’s post-1795 work. Beginning with a discussion of the late-18th century German reception of Brunonian theory, the idea of vital stimulus, and their importance for Kant, I assess the distinction drawn between gluttony and intoxication in The Metaphysics of Morals and (...)
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  15. Challenges of Anticipation of Future Decisions in Dementia and Dementia Research.Julia Perry - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    Anticipation of future decisions can be important for individuals at risk for diseases to maintain autonomy over time. For future treatment and care decisions, advance care planning is accepted as a useful anticipation tool. As research with persons with dementia seems imperative to develop disease-modifying interventions, and with changing regulations regarding research participation in Germany, advance research directives are considered a solution to include persons with dementia in research in an ethically sound manner. However, little is known about what affected (...)
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  16. Octavio Ocampo, Mexican Painter: A Metamorphic Look at the Discourse Between the Local and the Global.Juan Manuel Rodríguez Caso & Erica Torrens Rojas - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    AbstractArt and science is an area of research that has strengthened recently, mainly due to the impact of interdisciplinary work. At the same time, approaches between the humanities and the sciences have succeeded in re-signifying traditional views towards critical positions such as postcolonialism, especially in the colonially so-called “Global South”. In this paper, we want to review the case of the work of the Mexican artist Octavio Ocampo through works that present the case of biological and cultural evolution. From this, (...)
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  17.  2
    Phenotype-first hypotheses, spandrels and early metazoan evolution.Joshua Rust - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-23.
    Against the neo-Darwinian assumption that genetic factors are the principal source of variation upon which natural selection operates, a phenotype-first hypothesis strikes us as revolutionary because development would seem to constitute an independent source of variability. Richard Watson and his co-authors have argued that developmental memory constitutes one such variety of phenotypic variability. While this version of the phenotype-first hypothesis is especially well-suited for the late metazoan context, where animals have a sufficient history of selection from which to draw, appeals (...)
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  18.  7
    Humboldt, Darwin, and Theory of Evolution.Bogdana Stamenković - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-29.
    Numerous authors have examined the influence of other thinkers on Darwin’s formulation of some of the key concepts of the theory of evolution. Amongst those, Alexander von Humboldt often stands out – a scholar who, following his intention to explain the interconnection of various parts of the natural system, seems to tackle the question of evolution but does not offer an explicit answer. In this article, I examine Humboldt’s thoughts on evolution and the origin of species and evaluate his contribution (...)
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  19.  4
    Organic Form and Evolution: The Morphological Problem in Twentieth-Century Italian Biology.Marco Tamborini - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-17.
    This paper examines the efforts in evolution research to understand form’s structure that developed in Italy during the first half of the twentieth century. In particular, it analyzes how the organic approach in biology and the study of organic form merged in the morphological research agendas of Giuseppe Colosi and Giuseppe Levi. These biologists sought to understand form’s inner composition and structure. First, I will briefly outline the morphological practices and frameworks used to study form changes and structures in the (...)
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  20.  4
    Evaluating the Validity of Animal Models of Mental Disorder: From Modeling Syndromes to Modeling Endophenotypes.Hein van den Berg - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4).
    This paper provides a historical analysis of a shift in the way animal models of mental disorders were conceptualized: the shift from the mid-twentieth-century view, adopted by some, that animal models model syndromes classified in manuals such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), to the later widespread view that animal models model component parts of psychiatric syndromes. I argue that in the middle of the twentieth century the attempt to maximize the face validity of animal models (...)
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  21.  5
    Change in the Graphics of Journal Articles in the Life Sciences Field: Analysis of Figures and Tables in the Journal “Cell”.Kana Ariga & Manabu Tashiro - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-34.
    The purpose of this study is to examine how trends in the use of images in modern life science journals have changed since the spread of computer-based visual and imaging technology. To this end, a new classification system was constructed to analyze how the graphics of a scientific journal have changed over the years. The focus was on one international peer-reviewed journal in life sciences, Cell, which was founded in 1974, whereby 1725 figures and 160 tables from the research articles (...)
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  22.  1
    A Tale of Two Cities: Emotion and Reason in the Formation of Moral Judgement and Possible Metaethical Implications.Susana Cadilha - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-27.
    The project of naturalizing ethics has multiple contributions, from cognitive and moral psychology to primatology, neuroscience or evolutionary theory. One of the strategies for naturalizing ethics has been to argue that moral norms and values can be explained away if we focus on their causal history, if it is possible to offer both an ultimate and proximate causal explanation for them. In this article, I will focus on the contribution of cognitive and moral psychology as a way of offering a (...)
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  23.  1
    Correction To: Temporal Sociomedical Approaches to Intersex* Bodies.Limor Meoded Danon - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-1.
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  24.  2
    Is nationalizing universalizing and/or vice-versa?: A review essay on Elise K. Burton, Genetic Crossroads: The Middle East and the science of human heredity, Stanford University Press, 2021. IanMcGonigle, Genomic Citizenship: the molecularization of identity in the contemporaryMiddle East. The MIT Press 2021.Snait B. Gissis - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-15.
    This is a review essay of two books published in 2021 on the history of human heredity-genetics/genomics investigations—in the Middle East. Both books are structured comparatively. Both books grapple with the many uses of biology in nationalizing projects in the Middle East and the unavoidable tension between these particularizing projects and the scientific claim of biology to universality. Furthermore, both grapple with issues of classifications of humans and their uses in biology: the presumably biological human classifications of race, ethnos, and (...)
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  25.  7
    Organisms as Subjects: Jakob von Uexküll and Adolf Portmann on the Autonomy of Living Beings and Anthropological Difference.Filip Jaroš & Carlo Brentari - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-23.
    This paper focuses on the links between Jakob von Uexküll’s theoretical biology and Adolf Portmann’s conception of organic life. Its main purpose is to show that Uexküll and Portmann not only share a view of the living being as an autonomous and holistically organized entity, but also base this view on the seminal idea of the subjectivity of the organism. In other words, the respective holistic principles securing the autonomy of the living being—the Bauplan, for Uexküll; the Innerlichkeit, for Portmann—share (...)
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  26.  3
    Naomi Oreskes, Why trust science?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2019.Davis Kuykendall - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-4.
    Review of Naomi Oreskes’s why trust science?
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  27.  2
    Toward a Comparative History of Medical Genetics as a Medical Specialty in North America.William Leeming - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-21.
    Much of what has been written about the history of medical genetics in North America has focused on physician involvement in eugenics and the transition from heredity counseling to genetic counseling in the United States. What are typically missing in these accounts are details concerning the formation of a new medical specialty, i.e., medical genetics, and Canada’s involvement in specialty formation. Accordingly, this paper begins to fill in gaps by investigating, on the one hand, the history of American and Canadian (...)
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  28.  2
    Introduction: biomedical knowledge in a time of COVID-19.Sabina Leonelli - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-4.
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  29. Five common misconceptions regarding flattening-the-curve of COVID-19.Auni Aslah Mat Daud - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-7.
    In the fight against COVID-19 pandemic, the phrase “Flattening the curve” has become a rallying cry, popularized by government leaders and journalist in the news and on the social media. FTC is a succinct way of communicating an important public health message that physical distancing, mask-wearing and other public health measures will decrease the peak number of cases and prevent the healthcare system from being overwhelmed. However, while the message of FTC is right in the sense that limiting transmission will (...)
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  30.  27
    Health and Environment From Adaptation to Adaptivity: A Situated Relational Account.Laura Menatti, Leonardo Bich & Cristian Saborido - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-28.
    The definitions and conceptualizations of health, and the management of healthcare have been challenged by the current global scenarios (e.g., new diseases, new geographical distribution of diseases, effects of climate change on health, etc.) and by the ongoing scholarship in humanities and science. In this paper we question the mainstream definition of health adopted by the WHO—‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’ (WHO in Preamble to the constitution of (...)
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  31.  2
    Laboratory Animal Strain Mobilities: Handling with Care for Animal Sentience and Biosecurity.Emma Roe & Sara Peres - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-22.
    The global distribution of laboratory mouse strains is valued for ensuring the continuity, validity and accessibility of model organisms. Mouse strains are therefore assumed mobile and able to travel. We draw on the concept of ‘animal mobilities’ to explain how attending to laboratory mice as living animal, commodity and scientific tool is shaping how they are transported through contemporary scientific infrastructures and communities. Our paper is framed around exploring how animal strains travel, rather than animals, as we show that it (...)
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  32.  2
    Health as Temporally Extended: Theoretical Foundations and Implications.Ari Schick - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-22.
    This paper seeks to develop a theory of health that aligns with the shift in contemporary medical practice and research toward a temporally extended epidemiological view of health. The paper describes how such a theory is at the core of life course based approaches to health, and finds theoretical grounding in recent work in the philosophy of biology promulgating a process theory of life.
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  33.  2
    Death in Advance? A critique of the “Zombification” of people with dementia.Mark Schweda & Karin Jongsma - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-13.
    This contribution sets out to criticize the prominent metaphor of “death while alive” in the context of dementia. We first explain the historical origin and development as well as the philosophical premises of the image. We then take a closer look at its implications for understanding dementia and societal attitudes and behaviours towards those affected. In doing so, we adopt a life course perspective that seeks to account for the ethical significance of the temporal extension and structure of human life. (...)
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  34.  1
    A Hapless Mathematical Contribution to Biology: Chromosome Inversions in Drosophila, 1937–1941.Eric Tannier - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-22.
    This is the story, told in the light of a new analysis of historical data, of a mathematical biology problem that was explored in the 1930s in Thomas Morgan’s laboratory at the California Institute of Technology. It is one of the early developments of evolutionary genetics and quantitative phylogeny, and deals with the identification and counting of chromosomal inversions in Drosophila species from comparisons of genetic maps. A re-analysis of the data produced in the 1930s using current mathematics and computational (...)
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  35. Arnon Levy & Peter Godfrey-Smith (Eds.), The Scientific Imagination: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives, New York: Oxford University Press, 2020. [REVIEW]Adam Toon - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-3.
  36.  2
    Kostas Kampourakis & Tobias Uller (eds.), Philosophy of Science for Biologists, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020.Frank E. Zachos - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-3.
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  37.  4
    Figuring out what is happening: the discovery of two electrophysiological phenomena.William Bechtel & Richard Vagnino - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-36.
    Research devoted to characterizing phenomena is underappreciated in philosophical accounts of scientific inquiry. This paper develops a diachronic analysis of research over 100 years that led to the recognition of two related electrophysiological phenomena, the membrane potential and the action potential. A diachronic perspective allows for reconciliation of two threads in philosophical discussions of phenomena—Hacking’s treatment of phenomena as manifest in laboratory settings and Bogen and Woodward’s construal of phenomena as regularities in the world. The diachronic analysis also reveals the (...)
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  38.  5
    Metaphors We Lie By: Our ‘War’ Against COVID-19.Margherita Benzi & Marco Novarese - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-22.
    In this paper we discuss the influence of war as a metaphor in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. After an introduction on the traditional analysis of the war metaphor, we address the social consequences of using this metaphor, a topic that has been widely debated with regard to public communication in the context of COVID-19. We pay particular attention to a theory that many intellectuals have raised: the possibility that the use of the metaphor in this context is harmful (...)
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  39.  1
    Medical Technologies, Time, and the Good Life.Claudia Bozzaro - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-16.
    Against the backdrop of emerging medical technologies that promise transgression of temporal limits, this paper aims to show the importance that an individual lifetime’s finitude and fugacity have for the question of the good life. The paper’s first section examines how the passing of an individual’s finite lifetime can be experienced negatively, and thus cause “suffering from the passing of time.” The second section is based on a sociological analysis within the conceptual framework of individualization and capitalism, which characterizes many (...)
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  40.  7
    Natural Selection According to Darwin: Cause or Effect?Ben Bradley - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-26.
    In the 1940s, the ‘modern synthesis’ of Darwinism and genetics cast genetic mutation and recombination as the source of variability from which environmental events naturally select the fittest, such ‘natural selection’ constituting the cause of evolution. Recent biology increasingly challenges this view by casting genes as followers and awarding the leading role in the genesis of adaptations to the agency and plasticity of developing phenotypes—making natural selection a consequence of other causal processes. Both views of natural selection claim to capture (...)
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  41.  1
    The ‘Good’ of Extending Fertility: Ontology and Moral Reasoning in a Biotemporal Regime of Reproduction.Nolwenn Bühler - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-27.
    Since the emergence of in-vitro fertilization, a specific set of technologies has been developed to address the problem of the ‘biological clock’. The medical extension of fertility time is accompanied by promissory narratives to help women synchronize conflicting biological and social temporalities. This possibility also has a transgressive potential by blurring one of the biological landmarks – the menopause – by which reproductive lives are organized and governed. These new ways of managing, measuring and controlling reproductive time have renewed debates (...)
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  42.  5
    The ‘Is’ and the ‘Ought’ of the Animal Organism: Hegel’s Account of Biological Normativity.Luca Corti - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-22.
    This paper investigates Hegel’s account of the animal organism as it is presented in the Philosophy of Nature, with a special focus on its normative implications. I argue that the notion of “organisation” is fundamental to Hegel’s theory of animal normativity. The paper starts by showing how a Hegelian approach takes up the scientific image of organism and assigns a basic explanatory role to the notion of “organisation” in its understanding living beings. Moving from this premise, the paper turns to (...)
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  43.  8
    The Evolution of Moral Belief: Support for the Debunker’s Causal Premise.Michael T. Dale - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-18.
    The causal premise of the evolutionary debunking argument contends that human moral beliefs are explained by the process of natural selection. While it is universally acknowledged that such a premise is fundamental to the debunker’s case, the vast majority of philosophers focus instead on the epistemic premise that natural selection does not track moral truth and the resulting skeptical conclusion. Recently, however, some have begun to concentrate on the causal premise. So far, the upshot of this small but growing literature (...)
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  44.  6
    Values in Evolutionary Biology: A Comparison Between the Contemporary Debate on Organic Progress and Canguilhem’s Biological Philosophy.Silvia De Cesare - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-20.
    The aim of this paper is to make a comparison and build up a dialogue between two different philosophical approaches to values in evolutionary biology. First, I present the approach proposed by Alexander Rosenberg and Daniel McShea in their contribution to the contemporary debate on organic progress. i.e. the idea that there has been some kind of improvement concerning organisms over the history of life. Discussing organic progress raises the question of what “better” exactly means. This requires an explicit clarification (...)
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  45.  15
    Question-Driven Stepwise Experimental Discoveries in Biochemistry: Two Case Studies.Michael Fry - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-52.
    Philosophers of science diverge on the question what drives the growth of scientific knowledge. Most of the twentieth century was dominated by the notion that theories propel that growth whereas experiments play secondary roles of operating within the theoretical framework or testing theoretical predictions. New experimentalism, a school of thought pioneered by Ian Hacking in the early 1980s, challenged this view by arguing that theory-free exploratory experimentation may in many cases effectively probe nature and potentially spawn higher evidence-based theories. Because (...)
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  46.  1
    Francesca Michelini & Kristian Köchy (eds.), Jakob von Uexküll and philosophy: life, environments, anthropology, Abingdon: Routledge, 2020. [REVIEW]Andrea Gambarotto - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-5.
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  47.  2
    Ross L. Jones, Anatomists of Empire: race, evolution and the Discovery of Human Biology in the British World, North Melbourne: australian Scholarly Publishing, 2020.Matthew R. Goodrum - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-3.
  48.  3
    Re-situations of scientific knowledge: a case study of a skirmish over clusters vs clines in human population genomics.James Griesemer & Carlos Andrés Barragán - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-32.
    We track and analyze the re-situation of scientific knowledge in the field of human population genomics ancestry studies. We understand re-situation as a process of accommodating the direct or indirect transfer of objects of knowledge from one site/situation to other sites/situations. Our take on the concept borrows from Mary S. Morgan’s work on facts traveling while expanding it to include other objects of knowledge such as models, data, software, findings, and visualizations. We structure a specific case study by tracking the (...)
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  49.  1
    David Sepkoski, Catastrophic Thinking: Extinction and the Value of Diversity From Darwin to the Anthropocene, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2020. [REVIEW]Artemis Korniliou - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-3.
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  50.  1
    The Foucauldian Approach to Conservation: Pitfalls and Genuine Promises.Yves Meinard - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-18.
    Conservation biology is a branch of ecology devoted to conserving biodiversity. Because this discipline is based on the assumption that knowledge should guide actions, it endows experts with a power that should be questioned. The work of the French philosopher Michel Foucault can be seen as a relevant conceptual resource to think these aspects of conservation biology through. I critically analyse the relevance of the Foucauldian approach to conservation. I argue that Foucauldian arguments are deeply ambiguous, and therefore useless for (...)
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  51.  4
    Temporal sociomedical approaches to intersex* bodies.Limor Meoded Danon - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-28.
    The history of the field of intersex bodies/bodies with variations of sex development reflects the ongoing tension between sociomedical attempts to control uncertainty and reduce the duration of corporeal uncertainty by means of early diagnosis and treatment, and the embodied subjects who resist or challenge these attempts, which ultimately increase uncertainty. Based on various qualitative studies in the field of intersex, this article describes three temporal sociomedical approaches that have evolved over the last decade and aims to address the uncertainty (...)
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  52.  1
    Matthew’s (1915) climate and evolution, the “New York School of Biogeography”, and the rise and fall of “Holarcticism”.Juan J. Morrone - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-27.
    Climate and evolution represents an important contribution to evolutionary biogeography, that influenced several authors, notably Karl P. Schmidt, George S. Myers, George G. Simpson, Philip J. Darlington, Ernst Mayr, Thomas Barbour, John C. Poynton, Allen Keast, Léon Croizat, Robin Craw, Michael Heads, and Osvaldo A. Reig. Authors belonging to the “New York School of Zoogeography” –a research community including Matthew, Schmidt, Myers and Simpson– accepted Matthew’s “Holarcticism” and the permanence of ocean basins and continents, whereas others, especially panbiogeographers and cladistic (...)
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  53.  3
    The emergence of temporality in attitudes towards cryo-fertility: a case study comparing German and Israeli social egg freezing users.Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty & Silke Schicktanz - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-26.
    Assistive reproductive technologies are increasingly used to control the biology of fertility and its temporality. Combining historical, theoretical, and socio-empirical insights, this paper aims at expanding our understanding of the way temporality emerges and is negotiated in the contemporary practice of cryopreservation of reproductive materials. We first present an historical overview of the practice of cryo-fertility to indicate the co-production of technology and social constructions of temporality. We then apply a theoretical framework for analysing cryobiology and cryopreservation technologies as creating (...)
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  54.  2
    Mechanisms of macromolecular reactions.Ross L. Stein - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-28.
    During the past two decades, philosophers of biology have increasingly turned their attention to mechanisms of biological phenomena. Through analyses of mechanistic proposals advanced by biologists, the goal of these philosophers is to understand what a mechanism is and how mechanisms explain. These analyses have generally focused on mechanistic proposals for phenomenon that occur at the cellular or sub-cellular level, such as synapse firing, protein synthesis, or metabolic pathway operation. Little is said about the mechanisms of the macromolecular reactions that (...)
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  55.  2
    Making kangaroos grievable; making grievability non-human.Yvette Kim Clarissa Wijnandts - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-16.
    When Australian economist Ross Garnaut proposed to increase the commercial kangaroo industry in 2008, it started a national debate on the supposed edibility of kangaroos. Campaigns against the commercial kangaroo industry and hesitance amongst many consumers to eat kangaroo reflect concerns about viewing kangaroos as food. This article explores the reactions and challenges that originate from the kangaroo’s changing role in society by using Judith Butler’s concept of grievable lives. Using this framework shows that what animals we eat goes beyond (...)
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  56.  1
    Kerry Lynn Macintosh, Enhanced Beings: Human Germline Modification and the Law, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Antonio Diéguez - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-4.
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  57.  4
    Jimena Canales, Bedeviled: A Shadow History of Demons in Science, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2020. [REVIEW]Rawad El Skaf - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-4.
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  58.  3
    The Kantian Account of Mechanical Explanation of Natural Ends in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Biology.Henk Jochemsen & Wim Beekman - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-24.
    The rise of the mechanistic worldview in the seventeenth century had a major impact on views of biological generation. Many seventeenth century naturalists rejected the old animist thesis. However, the alternative view of gradual mechanistic formation in embryology didn’t convince either. How to articulate the peculiarity of life? Researchers in the seventeenth century proposed both “animist” and mechanistic theories of life. In the eighteenth century again a controversy in biology arose regarding the explanation of generation. Some adhered to the view (...)
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  59.  3
    Michel Morange: The Black Box of Biology: A History of the Molecular Revolution, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.Kostas Kampourakis - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-4.
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  60.  5
    Philipp Fischer, Gabriele Gramelsberger, Christoph Hoffmann, Hans Hofmann, Hans-Jorg Rheinberger, Hannes Rickli, Natures of Data: A Discussion Between Biology, History and Philosophy of Science and Art, Zurich: Diaphanes, 2020.Emanuele Ratti - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-4.
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  61.  5
    Kraepelin’s Psychiatry in the Pragmatic Age.David Rattray - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-35.
    The movement of a pendulum is often used as a metaphor to represent the history of twentieth century American psychiatry. On this view, American psychiatry evolved by swinging back and forth between two schools of thought in constant competition: somatic accounts of mental illness and psychodynamic ones. I argue that this narrative partly misrepresents the actual development of American psychiatry. I suggest that there were some important exchanges of ideas and practices in the transition from German biological approaches to American (...)
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    Evolution and ethics viewed from within two metaphors: machine and organism.Michael Ruse - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-17.
    How is moral thinking, ethics, related to evolutionary theorizing? There are two approaches, epitomized by Charles Darwin who works under the metaphor of the world as a machine, and by Herbert Spencer who works under the metaphor of the world as an organism. Although the author prefers the first approach, the aim of this paper is to give a disinterested account of both approaches.
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  63.  1
    Practicing virology: making and knowing a mid-twentieth century experiment with Tobacco mosaic virus.Karen-Beth G. Scholthof, Lorenzo J. Washington, April DeMell, Maria R. Mendoza & Will B. Cody - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-28.
    Tobacco mosaic virus has served as a model organism for pathbreaking work in plant pathology, virology, biochemistry and applied genetics for more than a century. We were intrigued by a photograph published in Phytopathology in 1934 showing that Tabasco pepper plants responded to TMV infection with localized necrotic lesions, followed by abscission of the inoculated leaves. This dramatic outcome of a biological response to infection observed by Francis O. Holmes, a virologist at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, was used (...)
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  64. Biological Constraints as Norms in Evolution.Mathilde Tahar - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-21.
    Biology seems to present local and transitory regularities rather than immutable laws. To account for these historically constituted regularities and to distinguish them from mathematical invariants, Montévil and Mossio have proposed to speak of constraints. In this article we analyse the causal power of these constraints in the evolution of biodiversity, i.e., their positivity, but also the modality of their action on the directions taken by evolution. We argue that to fully account for the causal power of these constraints on (...)
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  65.  4
    Sherrie L. Lyons, From Cells to Organisms: Re-envisioning Cell Theory, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2020.Hanna Lucia Worliczek - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-5.
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