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  1. C harles W olfe, La philosophie de la biologie avant la biologie. Une histoire du vitalisme, Paris: Classiques Garnier, 2019, 514 pp., €56 /€93. [REVIEW]Boris Demarest - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):38.
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  2.  10
    From parts to mechanisms: research heuristics for addressing heterogeneity in cancer genetics.William Bechtel - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):27.
    A major approach to cancer research in the late twentieth century was to search for genes that, when altered, initiated the development of a cell into a cancerous state or failed to stop this development. But as researchers acquired the capacity to sequence tumors and incorporated the resulting data into databases, it became apparent that for many tumors no genes were frequently altered and that the genes altered in different tumors in the same tissue type were often distinct. To address (...)
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  3.  7
    Intellectual Directions for History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, 2019–2023.Giovanni Boniolo & Sabina Leonelli - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):28.
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  4.  3
    The Commercialization of the Biomedical Sciences: (Mis)Understanding Bias.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):34.
    The growing commercialization of scientific research has raised important concerns about industry bias. According to some evidence, so-called industry bias can affect the integrity of the science as well as the direction of the research agenda. I argue that conceptualizing industry’s influence in scientific research in terms of bias is unhelpful. Insofar as industry sponsorship negatively affects the integrity of the research, it does so through biasing mechanisms that can affect any research independently of the source of funding. Talk about (...)
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  5.  4
    A lban F rei, Sichtbare Netzwerke. Forschungspolitik und Life - Sciences zwischen 1990 und 2016 in der Schweiz. Eine Fallstudie zu SystemsX.ch, Zürich: Chronos Verlag, 2018, 272 pp., CHF 38.00/EUR 38.00. [REVIEW]Fridolin Gross - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):37.
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  6.  3
    R ussell W inslow, Organism and environment: inheritance and subjectivity in the life sciences. Lexington: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017, 246 pp., $95.00. [REVIEW]Kristian Köchy - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):29.
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  7.  1
    C hristopher J. A ustin, Essence in the age of evolution: a new theory of natural kinds, New York and Oxon: Routledge Studies in the Philosophy of Science, 2019, 144 pp., £115.00. [REVIEW]Silvia Basanta Martínez - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):35.
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  8.  5
    The galaxy of the non-Linnaean nomenclature.Alessandro Minelli - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):31.
    Contrary to the traditional claim that needs for unambiguous communication about animal and plant species are best served by a single set of names ruled by international Codes, I suggest that a more diversified system is required, especially to cope with problems emerging from aggregation of biodiversity data in large databases. Departures from Linnaean nomenclature are sometimes intentional, but there are also other, less obvious but widespread forms of not Code-compliant grey nomenclature. A first problem is due to the circumstance (...)
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  9. Time to elaborate on some of Scholander’s ideas: Does even a rudimentary form of the response of diving mammals exist in humans?Michael John Parkes - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):32.
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  10. R ussell B onduriansky & T roy D ay, Extended heredity : a new understanding of inheritance and evolution, Princeton University Press, 2018, 288 pp, ISBN 9780691157672. [REVIEW]Gaëlle Pontarotti & Arantza Etxeberria - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):33.
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  11.  1
    A listair S ponsel, Darwin’s Evolving Identity: Adventure, Ambition, and the Sin of Speculation, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018, x + 358 pp., $50.00. [REVIEW]Greg Priest - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):36.
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  12.  1
    How to Produce ‘Marketable and Profitable Results for the Company’: From Viral Interference to Roferon A.Carsten Timmermann - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (3):30.
    This paper looks at the commodification of interferon, marketed by Hoffmann La Roche as Roferon A in 1986, as a case study that helps us understand the role of pharmaceutical industry in cancer research, the impact of molecular biology on cancer therapy, and the relationships between biotech start-ups and established pharmaceutical firms. Drawing extensively on materials from the Roche company archives, the paper traces interferon’s trajectory from observed phenomenon to product. Roche embraced molecular biology in the late 1960s to prepare (...)
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  13.  9
    A drian C urrie, Rock, Bone, and Ruin: An Optimist’s Guide to the Historical Sciences, Cambridge, The MIT Press, 2018, 376 pp., $35. [REVIEW]Thomas Bonnin - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):16.
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  14.  7
    Conceptual heterogeneity and the legacy of organicism: thoughts on the life organic.Daniel S. Brooks - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):24.
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  15.  12
    Taxonomy and conservation science: interdependent and value-laden.Stijn Conix - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):15.
    The relation between conservation science and taxonomy is typically seen as a simple dependency of the former on the latter. This dependency is assumed to be strictly one-way to avoid normative concerns from conservation science inappropriately affecting the descriptive discipline of taxonomy. In this paper, I argue against this widely assumed standard view on the relation between these two disciplines by highlighting two important roles for conservation scientists in scientific decisions that are part of the internal stages of taxonomy. I (...)
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  16.  12
    D avid L ivingstone S mith , How Biology Shapes Philosophy: New Foundations for Naturalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017, xiv + 351 pp., £78.99. [REVIEW]Shane N. Glackin - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):17.
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  17.  6
    Blood, Race and Indigenous Peoples in Twentieth Century Extreme Physiology.Vanessa Heggie - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):26.
    In the first half of the twentieth century the attention of American and European researchers was drawn to the area of ‘extreme physiology’, partly because of expeditions to the north and south poles, and to high altitude, but also by global conflicts which were fought for the first time with aircraft, and involved conflict in non-temperate zones, deserts, and at the freezing Eastern front. In an attempt to help white Euro-Americans survive in extreme environments, physiologists, anthropologists, and explorers studied indigenous (...)
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  18.  8
    Physiology studies and scientific exchange in the Anthropology Laboratory of the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro.Adriana T. A. Martins Keuller - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):22.
    The main purpose of this study is the scientific practice of Edgard Roquette-Pinto at the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro during the 1910’s and 1920’s in the XXth Century. The article examines the relationship between laboratory science and nation building. Driven by Physicians-Anthropologists like Edgard Roquette-Pinto among others, the investigations performed at the Anthropology Laboratory there reveal the dynamic of the borders between Laboratory and Field Sciences, and the new biological parameters adopted at that time. The investigative agenda involved (...)
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  19.  4
    R. P aul T hompson & R oss E.G. U pshur, Philosophy of Medicine: An Introduction, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, 194 pp. [REVIEW]Maël Lemoine - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):18.
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  20.  5
    All things bleak and bare beneath a brazen sky: practice and place in the analysis of Australopithecus.Paige Madison - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):19.
    The fossilized primate skull known as the Taungs Baby, discovered in South Africa, was put forward in 1925 as a controversial ‘missing link’ between humans and apes. This essay examines the controversy generated by the fossil, with a focus on practice and the circulation of material objects. Viewing the Taungs story from this perspective provides a new outlook on debates, one that suggests that attention to the importance of place, particularly the ways that specific localities shape scientific practices, is crucial (...)
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  21.  7
    L ucas M c G ranahan, Darwinism and Pragmatism: William James on Evolution and Self - Transformation, 2017, Routledge, 200 pp., $160.00. [REVIEW]Jay Odenbaugh - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):23.
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  22.  6
    Evolutionary causes as mechanisms: a critical analysis.Saúl Pérez-González & Victor J. Luque - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):13.
    In this paper, we address the question whether a mechanistic approach can account for evolutionary causes. The last decade has seen a major attempt to account for natural selection as a mechanism. Nevertheless, we stress the relevance of broadening the debate by including the other evolutionary causes inside the mechanistic approach, in order to be a legitimate conceptual framework on the same footing as other approaches to evolutionary theory. We analyse the current debate on natural selection as a mechanism, and (...)
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  23.  7
    S Tuart G Lennan, The New Mechanical Philosophy, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, 266 Pp., $40.00. [REVIEW]Christopher A. Rickels - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):25.
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  24.  5
    K ärin N ickelsen, Explaining Photosynthesis: Models of Biochemical Mechanisms, 1840 – 1960, Springer, Dordrecht, 2015.Stéphane Tirard - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):20.
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  25.  13
    Philosophical Import of Non-Epistemic Values in Clinical Trials and Data Interpretation.Joby Varghese - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):14.
    In this essay, I argue that at least in two phases of pharmaceutical research, especially while assessing the adequacy of the accumulated data and its interpretation, the influence of non-epistemic values is necessary. I examine a specific case from the domain of pharmaceutical research and demonstrate that there are multiple competing sets of values which may legitimately or illegitimately influence different phases of the inquiry. In such cases, the choice of the appropriate set of values—epistemic as well as non-epistemic—should be (...)
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  26.  6
    The plurality of assumptions about fossils and time.Caitlin Donahue Wylie - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):21.
    A research community must share assumptions, such as about accepted knowledge, appropriate research practices, and good evidence. However, community members also hold some divergent assumptions, which they—and we, as analysts of science—tend to overlook. Communities with different assumed values, knowledge, and goals must negotiate to achieve compromises that make their conflicting goals complementary. This negotiation guards against the extremes of each group’s desired outcomes, which, if achieved, would make other groups’ goals impossible. I argue that this diversity, as a form (...)
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  27.  13
    Realization in Biology?Sergio Balari & Guillermo Lorenzo - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):5.
    It is widely assumed that functional and dispositional properties are not identical to their physical base, but that there is some kind of asymmetrical ontological dependence between them. In this regard, a popular idea is that the former are realized by the latter, which, under the non-identity assumption, is generally understood to be a non-causal, constitutive relation. In this paper we examine two of the most widely accepted approaches to realization, the so-called ‘flat view’ and the ‘dimensioned view’, and we (...)
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  28.  7
    Between biology and chemistry in the Enlightenment: how nutrition shapes vital organization. Buffon, Bonnet, C.F. Wolff.Cécilia Bognon-Küss - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):11.
    This paper seeks to characterize how the study of nutrition processes contributed to revisit the problem of vital organization in the late eighteenth century. It argues that focusing on nutrition leads to reformulate the problem of the relation between life and organization in terms of processes, rather than static or given structures. This nutrition-centered approach to life amounts to acknowledge the specific strategic role nutrition played in the development of a materialist approach to the generation of vital organization. The paper (...)
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  29.  30
    Evaluating Evidential Pluralism in Epidemiology: Mechanistic Evidence in Exposome Research.Stefano Canali - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):4.
    In current philosophical discussions on evidence in the medical sciences, epidemiology has been used to exemplify a specific version of evidential pluralism. According to this view, known as the Russo–Williamson Thesis, evidence of both difference-making and mechanisms is produced to make causal claims in the health sciences. In this paper, I present an analysis of data and evidence in epidemiological practice, with a special focus on research on the exposome, and I cast doubt on the extent to which evidential pluralism (...)
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  30.  21
    Simplicity, one-shot hypotheses and paleobiological explanation.Adrian Currie - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):10.
    Paleobiologists often provide simple narratives to explain complex, contingent episodes. These narratives are sometimes ‘one-shot hypotheses’ which are treated as being mutually exclusive with other possible explanations of the target episode, and are thus extended to accommodate as much about the episode as possible. I argue that a provisional preference for such hypotheses provides two kinds of productive scaffolding. First, they generate ‘hypothetical difference-makers’: one-shot hypotheses highlight and isolate empirically tractable dependencies between variables. Second, investigations of hypothetical difference-makers provision explanatory (...)
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  31.  9
    S ara G reen , Philosophy of Systems Biology: Perspectives from Scientists and Philosophers, Springer International Publishing, 2017, 265 pp, ISBN 978-3-319-47000-9. [REVIEW]Jonathan Davies - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):9.
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  32.  9
    Roman Göbel, Gerhard Müller, and Claudia Taszus , Ernst Haeckel: Ausgewählte Briefwechsel. Band 1: Familienkorrespondenz Februar 1839–April 1854. [REVIEW]Christiane Groeben - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):6.
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  33.  11
    Pluralization through epistemic competition: scientific change in times of data-intensive biology.Fridolin Gross, Nina Kranke & Robert Meunier - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):1.
    We present two case studies from contemporary biology in which we observe conflicts between established and emerging approaches. The first case study discusses the relation between molecular biology and systems biology regarding the explanation of cellular processes, while the second deals with phylogenetic systematics and the challenge posed by recent network approaches to established ideas of evolutionary processes. We show that the emergence of new fields is in both cases driven by the development of high-throughput data generation technologies and the (...)
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  34.  8
    The impacts of assumptions on theories of tooth development and evolution at the turn of the nineteenth century.Kate MacCord - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):12.
    Throughout the last quarter of the nineteenth century, researchers became increasingly interested in explaining the ways in which mammalian teeth, especially molars, and their complex arrangements of cusps arose along both developmental and evolutionary timescales. By the 1890s, two theories garnered special prominence; the tritubercular theory and the concrescence theory. The tritubercular theory was proposed by Edward Drinker Cope in 1883, and later expanded by Henry Fairfield Osborn in 1888, while the concrescence theory was developed by Carl Röse in 1892. (...)
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  35.  9
    H anna H odacs, K enneth N yberg and S téphane V an D amme , Linnaeus, Natural History and the Circulation of Knowledge , Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 2018, xv + 274 pp., £75.00. [REVIEW]Anne Greenwood MacKinney - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):8.
  36.  5
    ‘Birth, life, and death of infectious diseases’: Charles Nicolle and the invention of medical ecology in France.Pierre-Olivier Méthot - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):2.
    In teasing out the diverse origins of our “modern, ecological understanding of epidemic disease” Greater than the parts: holism in biomedicine, 1920–1950, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998), historians have downplayed the importance of parasitology in the development of a natural history perspective on disease. The present article reassesses the significance of parasitology for the “invention” of medical ecology in post-war France. Focussing on the works of microbiologist Charles Nicolle and on that of physician and zoologist Hervé Harant, I argue that (...)
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  37.  4
    Internalism, Externalism and Life-Cyclism in the History of Helminthology.Martín Orensanz - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):7.
    The history of helminthology in the Early Modern Period has been characterized as a debate between two camps, the internalists and the externalists. The internalists believed that helminths are spontaneously generated within the body of the host, whereas the externalists claimed that helminths enter the host from the external environment. According to the this account, the debate between these two camps ended in the nineteenth century with the victory of the externalist viewpoint. Here, we redefine these two terms, as well (...)
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  38.  6
    J Onathan B Irch, The Philosophy of Social Evolution, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, X + 268 Pp., Hardcover. [REVIEW]Ayelet Shavit - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (1):3.
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