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  1.  1
    Jameson with Lacan.Clint Burnham - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):187-197.
    What does it mean to bring Marxism and psychoanalysis together at this conjuncture? Such a project has been a throughline, arguably, for Fredric Jameson’s work for the past four decades. In this review-article, I read his chapter on Lacan and Hamlet for how it helps us to understand, not only how Jameson’s ruminations on desire and neurosis highlight the social tendencies in Lacanian theory, but also how that relationship throws new light on both the Marxist project and psychoanalysis proper.
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  2.  4
    Jameson on Allegory: Notes From the Periphery.Maria Elisa Cevasco - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):151-161.
    This piece makes a comment on the usefulness of allegory as a mode of reading, by way of an examination of the representation of nationalism in Jameson and in Antonio Candido.
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  3.  4
    Lockdown Politics: A Response to Panagiotis Sotiris.Gareth Dale - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):247-262.
    In ‘Thinking Beyond the Lockdown’, Panagiotis Sotiris argues that lockdowns are repressive and should be opposed. In this response I take issue with his analysis. He posits the existence of a ‘lockdown strategy’ which has little relation to reality. He identifies lockdowns with neoliberalism, flirts with the Great Barrington project, and calls for anti-lockdown resistance – without so much as a glance at the right-wing libertarian camps that are also staked out on this terrain. On these points, and in respect (...)
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  4.  3
    Introduction to the Italian Translation of Fredric Jameson’s Marxism and Form.Franco Fortini & Toscano Alberto - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):235-246.
    This text is essayist, critic and poet Franco Fortini’s introduction to the Italian translation of Fredric Jameson’s Marxism and Form. Fortini frames his assessment of Jameson in terms of a contrast with the Italian reception of the dialectical criticism assayed in Marxism and Form.
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  5.  2
    The First Workers’ Government in History: Karl Marx’s Addenda to Lissagaray’s History of the Commune of 1871.Daniel Gaido - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):49-112.
    In Marxist circles it is common to refer to Karl Marx’s The Civil War in France for a theoretical analysis of the historical significance of the Paris Commune, and to Prosper-Olivier Lissagaray’s History of the Commune of 1871 for a description of the facts surrounding the insurrection of the Paris workers and its repression by the National Assembly led by Adolphe Thiers. What is less well-known is that Marx himself oversaw the German translation of Lissagaray’s book and made numerous additions (...)
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  6.  5
    The Jamesonian Impersonal; or, Person as Allegory.Daniel Hartley - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):174-186.
    This article locates Fredric Jameson’s Allegory and Ideology in the context of the broader trajectory of his career-long critique of the bourgeois centred subject. It argues that, for Jameson, the project of critique requires systematic depersonalisation at the level of thought. Contrary to negative liberal humanist interpretations of depersonalisation, Jameson stresses its hidden, revolutionary potential. Where his earlier work eschewed metanarratives of modernity premised upon shifts in subjectivity, preferring conjunctural or situational analyses, his more recent work – Antinomies of Realism (...)
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  7.  1
    On Levels and Categories.Fredric R. Jameson - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):221-233.
    This article is a response by the author to the contributions to the Historical Materialism symposium on Allegory and Ideology. The reply is framed in terms of the different theoretical strategies through which the articulation of ‘Marx’ and ‘Freud’ has been carried out, namely the precarious syntheses of Freudo-Marxism, the homological method pioneered by Lucien Goldmann, and the theory of allegorical levels and transcoding explored in Allegory and Ideology. It critically engages with the openings and challenges posed by the various (...)
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  8.  2
    The Future Perfect, Otherwise: Narrative, Abstraction and History in the Work of Fredric Jameson.Leigh Claire La Berge - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):211-220.
    There has long been a tension in Fredric Jameson’s work regarding the extent to which it is possible or warranted to develop transhistorical categories for literary interpretation across of the whole of the capitalist mode of production. In my contribution to this symposium, I take up the problem of how Jameson’s Allegory and Ideology participates in such questions in its consideration of periodisation and narrativisation through the particular construction of allegory, from the early modern age to our financial present.
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  9.  3
    Difference Relates: Allegory, Ideology, and the Anthropocene.Carolyn Lesjak - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):123-133.
    Fredric Jameson’s recent book, Allegory and Ideology, argues that allegory has become a ‘social symptom’, an attempt during moments of historical crisis to represent reality even as that reality, rife with contradictory levels, eludes representation. Mobilising the fourfold medieval system of allegory he first introduced in The Political Unconscious, Jameson traces a formal history of attempts to come to terms with the ‘multiplicities’ and incommensurable levels that emerge within modernity and postmodernity. This article identifies the complexities of Jameson’s understanding of (...)
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  10.  3
    Seize the Means of Carbon Removal: The Political Economy of Direct Air Capture.Andreas Malm & Wim Carton - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):3-48.
    The left must confront the politics of removing carbon from the atmosphere – a topic rapidly making its way to the top of the climate agenda. We here examine the technology of direct air capture, tracing its intellectual origins and laying bare the political economy of its current manifestations. We find a space crowded with ideology-laden metaphors, ample fossil-capital entanglements and bold visions for a new, ethereal frontier of capital accumulation. These diversions must be cut short if a technology with (...)
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  11.  2
    Everything for Me Turns Into Allegory.Gabriele Pedullà - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):198-210.
    While being an important tile of Jameson’s whole theoretical project, Allegory and Ideology leaves some key questions not fully answered. Briefly put, these questions concern the meanings and limits of allegory; the unstable relationship between allegory and allegoresis in the Western cultural tradition; and the special place allegory plays or could play in postmodern culture. Solving these problems – in the footsteps of Jameson’s magisterial inquiry – will be crucial especially for Marxist critics.
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  12.  3
    Elsewhere and Otherwise.Alberto Toscano - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (1):113-122.
    This text introduces the symposium on Fredric Jameson’s Allegory and Ideology, the second volume in his six-part The Poetics of Social Forms. It frames the debate with a brief exploration of some of the figures and problems of allegory that appear across Jameson’s œuvre, and surveys some of the Marxist conceptualisations of allegory that have shaped Jameson’s approach, as it straddles allegories of the commodity and allegories of utopia. The musical investigation of the nexus of allegory and affect, and the (...)
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