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  1.  2
    Affect Theory and Breast Cancer Memoirs: Rescripting Fears of Death and Dying in the Anthropocene.Jennifer Mae Hamilton - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (4):3-29.
    Re-evaluating dominant cultural narratives around dying and death is central to new critiques of individualism and human exceptionalism. As conceptual tools for theorizing the end of the individual proliferate, the affective dimensions of this project are often overlooked, especially as they pertain to individual subjects. In contrast, a significant number of iconic queer and feminist thinkers have suffered breast cancer and written memoirs representing the subjective experience of confronting mortality. This article identifies the affective orientations towards one’s own mortality as (...)
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  2. Governing Corporeal Movement in India During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Pablo Holwitt - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (4):81-107.
    This article explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the relationship between bodies, risk and mobility. Drawing upon ethnographic data from India, it is argued that measures taken by the Indian government to contain the spread of the pandemic link mobile bodies to the notion of risk which has profound consequences for the way in which people access and engage with public spaces in Indian cities. In this process, a new type of body – the risky mobile body – (...)
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  3.  2
    Women’s Bodies and the Evolution of Anti-Rape Technologies: From the Hoop Skirt to the Smart Frock.Robyn Lincoln, Alex Bevan & Caroline Wilson-Barnao - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (4):30-54.
    In this article, we explore smart deterrents and their historical precedents marketed to women and girls for the purpose of preventing harassment, sexual abuse and violence. Rape deterrents, as we define them, encompass customs, architectures, fashions, surveillant infrastructures, apps and devices conceived to manage and protect the body. Online searches reveal an array of technologies, and we engage with their prevention narratives and cultural construction discourses of the gendered body. Our critical analysis places recent rape deterrents in conversation with earlier (...)
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  4. Exploring the Multiplicity of Embodied Agency in Colombian Assisted Reproduction.Malissa Kay Shaw - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (4):55-80.
    Analyses of assisted reproductive technologies have demonstrated how objectification and agency can coexist in infertility centres. How objectification creates opportunities for empowerment, however, has not yet been explored. In analysing women’s narratives of assisted conception in Colombian infertility clinics, I demonstrate the complexity in women’s embodied experiences of various objectifying stages of assisted conception and argue that their experiences produced multiple forms of embodied agency. Women used diagnostic procedures to learn about their bodies and infertility complications, which augmented their authority (...)
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  5.  1
    Exoskeletons, Rehabilitation and Bodily Capacities.Denisa Butnaru - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (3):28-57.
    Motility impairments resulting from spinal cord injuries and cerebrovascular accidents are increasingly prevalent in society, leading to the growing development of rehabilitative robotic technologies, among them exoskeletons. This article outlines how bodies with neurological conditions such as spinal cord injury and stroke engage in processes of re-appropriation while using exoskeletons and some of the challenges they face. The main task of exoskeletons in rehabilitative environments is either to rehabilitate or ameliorate anatomic functions of impaired bodies. In these complex processes, they (...)
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  6.  1
    Headphones, Auditory Violence and the Sonic Flooding of Corporeal Space.Jacob Kingsbury Downs - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (3):58-86.
    In this article, I develop and redirect Julian Henriques’s model of sonic dominance through examination of accounts of acoustic violence and torture involving headphones. Specifically, I show how auditory experience has been weaponized as an intracorporeal phenomenon, with headphones effecting a sense of sounds invading the interior phenomenological space of the head. By analysing reported cases of sonic violence and torture involving headphones through a composite theoretical lens drawn from the fields of music, sound and body studies, I argue that (...)
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  7.  1
    Intimate Lives in the Global Bioeconomy: Reproductive Biographies of Mexican Egg Donors.Carolin Schurr & Laura Perler - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (3):3-27.
    Research on cross-border reproductive care has shown how the geographical, historical, economic and political contexts in which egg donation takes place shape this transnational practice. As many women offer their oocytes due to their precarious conditions, they become seen as ‘bioavailable bodies’. The presence of these bioavailable bodies is key to the emergence of global egg donation hotspots. We argue that feminist research needs to go beyond the conceptualization of egg donors as bioavailable bodies. We suggest the analysis of ‘reproductive (...)
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  8.  1
    Interview with Samantha Frost on ‘The Attentive Body’: Epigenetic Processes and Self-Formative Subjectivity.Tomoko Tamari - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (3):87-101.
    The interview is a follow-up from Samantha Frost’s article, ‘The Attentive Body’, in Body & Society 26. Tomoko Tamari invites Frost to explore her interest in ‘biocultural creatures’, with its focus on ‘bodies’ responsive self-transformation’ in epigenetic processes, and unfolds Peirce’s account of the index for understanding meaning-making in biological processes. Tamari also introduces Katherine Hayles’s notion of ‘cognitive nonconscious’ to raise the question of the possible theoretical and mechanical similarities/discrepancies between epigenetic processes in organisms and the meaning-making process in (...)
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  9.  2
    The Haunting Temporalities of Transplantation.Donna McCormack - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):58-82.
    This article examines the temporality of organ transplantation with a focus on memoirs where the recipient has received an organ from a deceased donor. I argue that death constitutes life. That is, this absent presence – that the organ is materially present but the person is dead and therefore absent – is the foundation for rethinking relationality as constituted through the haunting presence of those who remain central to the continuity of life but who are not alive in any strict (...)
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  10.  3
    Dancing with and Within the Digital Domain.Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):3-31.
    Digital cameras and motion capture technologies that document and share creative practices have transformed the way we think about dance as an embodied knowledge as well as the way we experience it bodily. Computational media, which not only records and archives but also calculates, analyses and models dance, further complicates its ontological status. This move to document and inscribe dance in a tangible medium marks a shift from understanding dance as an ungraspable event towards conceiving of dance as a tangible (...)
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  11.  1
    Recombinant DNA and Genome-Editing Technologies: Embodied Utopias and Heterotopias.Eva Šlesingerová - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):32-57.
    Recombinant DNA technology is an essential area of life engineering. The main aim of research in this field is to experimentally explore the possibilities of repairing damaged human DNA, healing or enhancing future human bodies. Based on ethnographic research in a Czech biochemical laboratory, the article explores biotechnological corporealities and their specific ontology through dealings with bio-objects, the bodywork of scientists. Using the complementary concepts of utopia and heterotopia, the text addresses the situation of bodies and bio-objects in a laboratory. (...)
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  12.  1
    Animal, Body, Data: Starling Murmurations and the Dynamic of Becoming In-Formation.Mickey Vallee - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):83-106.
    The aim of this article is to demonstrate that data modelling is becoming a crucial, if not dominant, vector for our understanding of animal populations and is consequential for how we study the affective relations between individual bodies and the communities to which they belong. It takes up the relationship between animal, body and data, following the datafication of starling murmurations, to explore the topological relationships between nature, culture and science. The case study thus embodies a data journey, invoking the (...)
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  13.  2
    Disposalscapes: ‘Estranged’ Limbs After Amputation.Esmée Hanna - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):27-59.
    The disposal of limbs remains absent from our understandings of amputation, with ‘estranged limbs’ occupying a liminal position. Despite acceptance that the appropriate disposal of human tissue matters on moral, ethical and legal grounds, limbs and their disposal is estranged from these discourses, mirroring the experience of the limbs themselves. This article then examines this absence around disposal, considering both the options which exist for the disposal of limbs after amputation, as well as why disposal itself remains sidelined from our (...)
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  14.  1
    Carrying as Method: Listening to Bodies as Archives.Nirmal Puwar - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):3-26.
    This article unpacks the notion of ‘carrying’ as an embodied set of influences that bear upon our research practices and journeys. It is widely recognised that we acquire and carry a body of books as intellectual companionship. It is not however readily acknowledged how we as researchers carry sounds, aesthetics, traumas and obsessions, which stay with us and take time to appear before us, as methodological projects within our grasp. Researchers are carriers embarked on exchanges in a double sense. Firstly, (...)
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  15.  10
    The (De)Materialization of Criminal Bodies in Forensic DNA Phenotyping.Filipa Queirós, Helena Machado & Rafaela Granja - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):60-84.
    Forensic DNA phenotyping is a genetic technology that might be used in criminal investigations. Based on DNA samples of the human body found at crime scenes, it allows to infer externally visible characteristics and continental-based biogeographical ancestry. By indicating the probable visible appearance of a criminal suspect, forensic DNA phenotyping allows to narrow down the focus of a criminal investigation. In this article, drawing on interviews with forensic geneticists, we explore how their narratives translate contemporary focus on criminal molecularized bodies. (...)
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  16.  5
    What More Do Bodies Know? Moving with the Gendered Affects of Place.E. J. Renold & Gabrielle Ivinson - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):85-112.
    This article focuses on what bodies know yet which cannot be expressed verbally. We started with a problem encountered during conventional interviewing in an ex-mining community in south Wales when some teen girls struggled to speak. This led us to focus on the body, corporeality and movement in improvisational dance workshops. By slowing down and speeding up video footage from the workshops, we notice movement patterns and speculate about how traces of gender body-movement practices developed within mining communities over time (...)
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