Year:

  1.  7
    Sporting Supererogation and Why It Matters.Alfred Archer - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):359-373.
    A commonly accepted feature of commonsense morality is that there are some acts that are supererogatory or beyond the call of duty. Recently, philosophers have begun to ask whether something like supererogation might exist in other normative domains such as epistemology and esthetics. In this paper, I will argue that there is good reason to think that sporting supererogation exists. I will then argue that recognizing the existence of sporting supererogation is important because it highlights the value of sport as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  4
    Is It Defensible for Women to Play Fewer Sets Than Men in Grand Slam Tennis?Paul Davis & Lisa Edwards - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):388-407.
    Lacking in the philosophy of sport is discussion of the gendered numbers of sets played in Grand Slam tennis. We argue that the practice is indefensible. It can be upheld only through false beliefs about women or repressive femininity ideals. It treats male tennis players unfairly in forcing them to play more sets because of their sex. Its ideological consequences are pernicious, since it reinforces the respective identifications of the female and male with physical limitation and heroism. Both sexes have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Strategic Fouls: A New Defense.Erin Flynn - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):342-358.
    Among philosophers, the question about strategic fouls has been whether they are ethically justified in light of our best conception of sport. This paper proposes a different defense. I argue that many strategic fouls should be excused even if we regard them as unjustified. I first lay out a partial defense of the assumptions that playing to win cannot be subordinate to playing skillfully and that winning has value that cannot be accounted for in terms of the skill that produces (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    Simulation, Seduction, and Bullshit: Cooperative and Destructive Misleading.Leslie A. Howe - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):300-314.
    This paper refines a number of theoretical distinctions relevant to deceptive play, in particular the difference between merely misleading actions and types of simulation commonly considered beyond the pale, such as diving. To do so, I rely on work in the philosophy of language about conversational convention and implicature, the distinction between lying and misleading, and their relation to concepts of seduction and bullshit. The paper works through a number of possible solutions to the question of what is wrong with (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  3
    Gender Equality in the Olympic Movement: Not a Simple Question, Not a Simple Answer.Koenigsberger Alexandra Avena - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):329-341.
    This article explores the strategies followed by the International Olympic Committee for the achievement of gender equality. It is argued that this international body can go beyond simply adopting an equality of opportunities approach to gender equality. It suggests which other strategies can be incorporated for which it draws on the different ways of understanding gender equality in gender political theory.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Toward a Shallow Interpretivist Model of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):285-299.
    Deep ethical interpretivism has been the standard view of the nature of sport in the philosophy of sport for the past seventeen years or so. On this account excellence assumes the role of the foundational, ethical goal that justice assumes in Ronald Dworkin’s interpretivist model of law. However, since excellence in sports is not an ethical value, and since it should not be regarded as an ultimate goal, the case for the traditional account fails. It should be replaced by the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  2
    The Ethics of Sport: What Everyone Needs to Know. [REVIEW]McKeever Sean - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):408-410.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. What Must I Know to Be Brave?: Revisiting the Role of Knowledge in the Exercise of Courage in Sport.M. Smith Jason - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):374-387.
    The Platonic definition of courage as the ‘knowledge of the fearful and the hopeful’ is often eschewed by philosophers of sport. In fact, the passionate nature of sport itself seems to testify against such a definition. Hence, accounts of courage within sport tend to emphasize the affective dimension of courage at the expense of the cognitive dimension. This essay argues in defense of the Platonic vision of courage as a species of knowledge as opposed to contemporary attempts to recover the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  5
    The Paradoxes of Utopian Game-Playing.P. Vossen Deborah - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):315-328.
    In The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Suits maintains the following two theses: game-playing is defined as ‘activity directed towards bringing about a specific state of affairs, using only means permitted by rules, where the rules prohibit more efficient in favour of less efficient means, and where such rules are accepted just because they make possible such activity’ and ‘game playing is what makes Utopia intelligible.’ Observing that these two theses cannot be jointly maintained absent paradox, this essay explores the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Playing Games: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport Through Dialogue. [REVIEW]C. Yorke Christopher - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):410-414.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  6
    Sport Philosophy Now: The Culture of Sports After the Lance Armstrong Scandal. [REVIEW]W. Austin Michael - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):281-284.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  8
    Transgender Women in Sport.Andria Bianchi - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):229-242.
    This paper considers whether transgender women should be permitted to compete in female categories in sports. Trans* women are often criticized for competing in female categories because they are seen as having an unfair advantage. Specifically, they are seen as having high levels of testosterone that unfairly enhance their performance in comparison to cisgender competitors. In this paper, I argue that trans* women should be permitted to compete in female categories. I suggest that if we want to maintain the skill (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  2
    Searle, Merleau-Ponty, Rizzolatti – Three Perspectives on Intentionality and Action in Sport.Gunnar Breivik - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):199-212.
    Actions in sport are intentional in character. They are directed at and are about something. This understanding of intentional action is common in continental as well as analytic philosophy. In sport philosophy, intentionality has received relatively little attention, but has more recently come on the agenda. In addition to what we can call ‘action intentionality,’ studied by philosophers like Searle, the phenomenological approach forwarded by Merleau-Ponty has opened up for a concept of ‘motor intentionality,’ which means a basic bodily attention (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    Toward Sport Reform: Hegemonic Masculinity and Reconceptualizing Competition.Colleen English - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):183-198.
    Hegemonic masculinity, a framework where stereotypically masculine traits are over-emphasized, plays a central role in sport, partly due to an excessive focus on winning. This type of masculinity marginalizes those that do not possess specific traits, including many women and men. I argue sport reform focused on mitigating hypercompetitive attitudes can reduce this harmful and marginalizing hegemonic masculinity in sport. I make this argument first by challenging the dichotomous nature of sport, especially in recognizing that all outcomes are a blend (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Sportsmanship. Multidisciplinary Perspectives. [REVIEW]Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):276-281.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  4
    Playing to Win Vs. Playing for Meaningful Victories.Stephen J. Laumakis, Peter A. Laumakis & Paul J. Laumakis - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):174-182.
    John Laumakis has offered a thought-provoking, but ultimately unpersuasive argument in favor of playing to your opponent’s strength instead of playing to their weakness. In the course of this reply, we hope to show that the idea of PTS not only undermines the real goal of athletic competition, but it also rests upon a confusion between matters of morality and the aims of sports, as well as equivocations on the kind of ‘excellence’ one pursues, and the nature of the ‘challenge’ (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  44
    A Moral Basis for Prohibiting Performance Enhancing Drug Use in Competitive Sport.Sean McKeever - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):243-257.
    A strong moral reason for prohibiting doping in sport is to be found in the bad choices that would be faced by clean athletes in a sporting world that tolerated doping. The case against doping is not, however, to be grounded in the concept of coercion. Instead, it is grounded in a general duty of sport to afford fair opportunity to the goods that are distinctively within sport's sphere of control. The moral reason to prohibit doping need not be balanced (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Why Olympia Matters for Modern Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):159-173.
    From the modern scientific perspective, Olympia is a ruin at the far end of a fading sense of history that represents little more than the origins from which sport has continuously evolved. Quantitative measurements show continued increases in human performance, equipment efficiency and funding. But some question this athletic evolution. We worry about qualitative issues, such as virtue, meaning and beauty. The source of this contrast is a difference in values: Olympic vs. Efficiency values. Such values establish an ethos in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  2
    On the Alleged Intrinsic Immorality of Mixed Martial Arts.Weimer Steven - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):258-275.
    In two recent articles, Nicholas Dixon has argued that the intent to hurt and injure opponents which is essential to mixed martial arts makes the sport intrinsically immoral. Although bondage, domination, sadism, and masochism also involves the intentional infliction of pain and injury, Dixon argues that it is morally permissible in many cases. In this paper, I examine the principle underlying Dixon's differentiation of MMA and BDSM. I argue that, when properly elaborated, that principle does not in fact condemn MMA (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  1
    Endless Summer: What Kinds of Games Will Suits’ Utopians Play?Christopher C. Yorke - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):213-228.
    I argue that we have good reason to reject Bernard Suits’ assertion that game-playing is the ideal of human existence, in the absence of a suitably robust account of utopian games. The chief motivating force behind this rejection rests in the fact that Suits begs the question that there exists some possible set of games-by-design in his utopia, such that the playing of its members would sustain an existentially meaningful existence for his utopians, in the event of a hypo-instrumental culture (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    Purism and the Category of ‘the Aesthetic’: The Drama Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):1-14.
    This paper examines one component of Stephen Mumford’s case for the claim that we should regard sport, art and the aesthetic as more closely connected than has tended to be the case, under the influence of the work of David Best, in recent years. Mumford’s rejection of what I call ‘the drama argument’ is examined in detail and it is argued that all but one element of his case fails to do the job he envisages.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  3
    Philosophy of Sport: Key Questions. [REVIEW]Colleen English - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):152-155.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    A Kantian View of Suits’ Utopia: ‘A Kingdom of Autotelically-Motivated Game Players’.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):138-151.
    In this paper, I engage the debate on Suits’ theory of games by providing a Kantian view of Utopia. I argue that although the Kantian aspects of Suits’ approach are often overlooked in comparison to its Socratic-Platonic aspects, Kant’s ideas play a fundamental role in Suits’ proposal. In particular, Kant’s concept of ‘regulative idea’ is the basis of Suits’ Utopia. I regard Utopia as Suits’ regulative idea on game playing. In doing so, I take Utopia to play a double role (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Underdogs, Upsets, and Overachievers.Jeffrey P. Fry - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):15-28.
    This paper explores three phenomena in sport that are connected to narratives of hope: underdogs, upsets, and overachievers. Each of these phenomena is complex. I seek not only to understand the intrinsic nature of these phenomena, but also to explain why they captivate the imagination. After exploring some partial explanations of their enduring appeal, I focus on how the drama associated with underdogs, upsets, and overachievers in sport illuminates the human condition and awakens our sense of possibility when the odds (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  2
    Sport as Meaningful Narratives.John Gleaves - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):29-43.
    Though many scholars have made claims as to the nature of sport, this article argues that these claims tend to narrowly focus on modern ideas derived primarily from Western competitive sport. Thus, most notions of sport fail to capture how various historical and non-Western cultures valued sport. In an attempt to provide a broader and more durable description of the nature of sport, this article argues that sports are fundamentally about telling a story about ourselves. These stories are meaningful narratives. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. The Philosophy of Human Movement. [REVIEW]Douglas Hochstetler - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):155-157.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  5
    Mumford on Aesthetic–Moral Interaction in Sport.Jason Holt - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):72-80.
    Stephen Mumford argues that aesthetic and moral values in sport are interdependent, focusing on cases where immorality taints beautiful performance. This interdependence thesis is insightful but, I argue, in need of refinement, as its normative implications are unclear and perhaps implausible. I also challenge Mumford’s perspective on the infamous Dynamo Kiev death match. Whereas Mumford claims that the match’s morally oppressive circumstances detract from it so that ‘it was not something knowingly we should have admired aesthetically’, I argue that, on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  2
    Ludonarrative Dissonance and Dominant Narratives.Leslie A. Howe - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):44-54.
    This paper explores ludonarrative dissonance as it occurs in sport, primarily as the conflict experienced by participants between dominant narratives and self-generated interpretations of embodied experience. Taking self-narrative as a social rather than isolated production, the interaction with three basic categories of dominant narrative is explored: transformative, representing a spectrum from revelatory to distorting, bullying and colonising. These forms of dominant narrative prescribe interpretations of the player’s experience of play and of self that displace their own, with the end result (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    Sport, Fiction, and the Stories They Tell.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):55-71.
    The article is intended to reveal important similarities between fiction and sport. I build on Jonathan Gottschall’s discussion in The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human by celebrating the significance of stories and their ‘witchy power’ and by examining factors that demonstrate similarities between fiction and sport. I suggest that an unmistakable semantic, structural, and cultural kinship exists between the two. This argument requires a discussion of play theory, play resources and constitutive rules, the semantic power of problems and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    On Game Definitions.Oliver Laas - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):81-94.
    Wittgenstein did not claim that the ordinary language concept ‘game’ cannot be defined: he claimed that there are multiple definitions that can be adopted for special purposes, but no single definition applicable to all games. I will defend this interpretation of Wittgenstein’s position by showing its compatibility with a pragmatic argumentative view of definitions, and how this view accounts for the diversity of disagreeing game definitions in definitional disputes.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Formalism and Strategic Fouls.Eric Moore - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):95-107.
    It is sometimes claimed that formalism and the logical incompatibility thesis together imply that fouls cannot be part of the game. Some philosophers think this proves that therefore strategic fouls are always morally wrong, but other philosophers think this result undermines formalism itself, since strategic fouls clearly are part of the game and are at least sometimes morally permissible. I show that formalism in fact does accommodate strategic fouls and that it is neutral about whether strategic fouls are morally permissible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  10
    Competition as Cooperation.C. Thi Nguyen - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):123-137.
    Games have a complex, and seemingly paradoxical structure: they are both competitive and cooperative, and the competitive element is required for the cooperative element to work out. They are mechanisms for transforming competition into cooperation. Several contemporary philosophers of sport have located the primary mechanism of conversion in the mental attitudes of the players. I argue that these views cannot capture the phenomenological complexity of game-play, nor the difficulty and moral complexity of achieving cooperation through game-play. In this paper, I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  5
    David Foster Wallace on Dumb Jocks and Athletic Genius.James Wilberding - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):108-122.
    David Foster Wallace was genuinely troubled by what he perceived to be a serious incongruity in the mental lives of elite athletes. To perform with grace and beauty, elite athletes must be ‘geniuses,’ yet in conversation and prose these same athletes often exhibit such vapidity and banality that he was tempted to simply write them off as unintelligent or worse. In response to this puzzle, Wallace developed different philosophical conceptions of the elite athlete aimed at bridging the gap between genius (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues