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  1.  1
    The Ahmadiyya, Blasphemy and Religious Freedom: The Institutional Discourse Analysis of Religious Discrimination in Indonesia.Zifirdaus Adnan & Andi Muhammad Irawan - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):79-102.
    The article investigates the development of discourses related to freedom of religion and discrimination against religious minority in current Indonesia by identifying the discourse constructions of Ahmadiyya in various texts and talks produced and disseminated by government institution and the Indonesian Council of Ulama. This study aims to reveal these institutions’ views and perspectives on Ahmadiyya issue using various discourse strategies. The data analysed are some legal proclamations issued and personal views delivered by the officials of these two institutions. The (...)
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  2.  1
    Re-Assessing the Evidentiary Threshold for Zinā’ in Islamic Criminal Law: A De Facto Exemption Proposal.Hassan M. Ahmad - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):103-132.
    This article considers the four eyewitness threshold for zinā’ in Islamic criminal law. In some Muslim-majority countries where zinā’ remains an offence, judiciaries have by-passed the threshold by accepting singular confessions from male fornicators or, otherwise, inferring fornication from pregnancy outside of marriage. As a result, a disproportionate number of women have been prosecuted, convicted, and even punished for zinā’. I assert that the four-eyewitness threshold allows for an alternative way to view zinā’ that can result in a different set (...)
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  3.  5
    A Critical Assessment of Turkey’s Positive Obligations in Combatting Violence Against Women: Looking Behind the Judgments.Devran Gülel - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):27-53.
    After almost two decades in power, R. T. Erdoğan and his Justice and Development Party have established authoritarian and Islamist governance in Turkey, which has adversely affected gender equality and women’s rights. So much so, that in 2009 the European Court of Human Rights acknowledged that there is a climate conducive to domestic violence in Turkey. Despite Erdoğan withdrawing Turkey unconstitutionally from the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence, the government cannot withdraw from the state’s (...)
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  4. Contextualizing Discrimination of Religious and Linguistic Minorities in South Thailand.Christopher Mark Joll - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):1-25.
    This article explores how scholarship can be put to work by specialists penning evidence-based policies seeking peaceful resolutions to long-standing, complex, and so-far intractable conflict in the Malay-Muslim dominated provinces of South Thailand. I contend that more is required than mere empirical data, and that the existing analysis of this conflict often lacks theoretical ballast and overlooks the wider historical context in which Bangkok pursued policies impacting its ethnolinguistically, and ethnoreligiously diverse citizens. I demonstrate the utility of both interacting with (...)
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  5.  5
    Genocide in Kashmir and the United Nations Failure to Invoke Responsibility to Protect (R2P): Causes and Consequences.Sumara Mehmood & Mehmood Hussain - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):55-77.
    The member states of the United Nations General Assembly in 2005 unanimously adopted the resolution on Responsibility to Protect to save citizens from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity. Since adoption, the norm has been invoked in Libya, South Sudan, Yemen, and Syria, nonetheless, the UN refrains to respond to the genocide committed in the Jammu & Kashmir and triggering a greater sense of anxiety. In this context, the present paper elucidates the factors behind the UN failure. (...)
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  6.  1
    Limitation Clauses and Constitutional Transformation: The Case of the New Arab Constitutions.Antonio-Martín Porras-Gómez - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):167-191.
    Focusing on the constitutional changes undergone since 2005 in Iraq, Sudan, Morocco, Tunisia and Egypt, this article explains how the constitutional limitation clauses affected the respective material constitutional transformations. The explanatory value of the limitation clauses is tested, with possible causalities explored through a case study. Generalizing research arguments are offered, theorizing about the material constitutional transformation processes in authoritarian and post-authoritarian scenarios. The research arguments shed light on the limitation clauses’ potential to reveal the policy intent underlying the constituent (...)
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  7.  1
    Blasphemy Law as a Structural Violence: A Challenge for Maintaining Sustainable Peace.Sidik Sunaryo & Cekli Setya Pratiwi - 2021 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 18 (1):133-165.
    Blasphemy law has become a central issue for the international community in various parts of the world in the last three decades. In almost every case involving the BL, especially in Muslim countries, such as Pakistan, Malaysia, and Indonesia, they are always responded with violence or threats of attack that cause many victims, loss of homes, damage to places of worship, evictions, stigma of being heretical, severe punishments, or extra-judicial killings. When international human rights law and declaration of the right (...)
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