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  1.  16
    Semi-parliamentarism and the challenges of institutional design.Sarah Birch - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):266-273.
    Semi-parliamentarism is a compelling design with attractive features, including those discussed by Ganghof, and also its likely tendency to break preference cycles and moderate politics. However, I argue that semi-parliamentarism may be a difficult system to sustain. My contribution concludes with consideration of how such systems might be preserved.
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  2.  9
    Inclusion and the design of democratic executives in Steffen Ganghof’s Beyond presidentialism and parliamentarism.Kevin J. Elliott - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):274-281.
    Steffen Ganghof’s book addresses pressing questions in democratic theory and institutional design regarding how to promote effective political inclusion and avoid personalizing power in democratic executives. His model of semi-parliamentarism manages to transform tradeoffs in these areas that were previously thought inescapable, unlocking novel potential for democratic reform.
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  3.  5
    Justifying types of representative democracy: a response.Steffen Ganghof - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):282-293.
    This article responds to critical reflections on my Beyond Presidentialism and Parliamentarism by Sarah Birch, Kevin J. Elliott, Claudia Landwehr and James L. Wilson. It discusses how different types of representative democracy, especially different forms of government (presidential, parliamentary or hybrid), can be justified. It clarifies, among other things, the distinction between procedural and process equality, the strengths of semi-parliamentary government, the potential instability of constitutional designs, and the difference that theories can make in actual processes of constitutional reform.
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  4.  40
    Civic equality as a democratic basis for public reason.Henrik D. Kugelberg - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):133-155.
  5.  15
    Institutional design beyond democratic innovations.Claudia Landwehr - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):259-265.
    Steffen Ganghof’s Beyond Presidentialism and Parliamentarism can improve existing typologies in comparative government and has great potential for discussions about democratic innovation and reform. So far, democratic innovations like deliberative mini-publics have remained mostly additive, leaving the underlying decision-making logics of representative political systems unchanged. Ganghof’s ideas can move debates about how deliberative democracy is to be institutionalized forward. Semi-parliamentary government constitutes an intriguing option to meet both demands for legislative flexibility and responsiveness to citizens’ concerns and demands for stability (...)
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  6. Righting domestic wrongs with refugee policy.Matthew Lindauer - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):206-223.
    Discriminatory attitudes towards Muslim refugees are common in liberal democracies, and Muslim citizens of these countries experience high rates of discrimination and social exclusion. Uniting these two facts is the well-known phenomenon of Islamophobia. But the implications of overlapping discrimination against citizens and non-citizens have not been given sustained attention in the ethics of immigration literature. In this paper, I argue that liberal societies have not only duties to discontinue refugee policies that discriminate against social groups like Muslims, but remedial (...)
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  7.  16
    Institutions of justice and intuitions of fairness: contesting goods, rules and inequalities.Udo Pesch - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):95-108.
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  8.  32
    The radical realist critique of Rawls: a reconstruction and response.Paul Raekstad - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):183-205.
  9.  32
    Immigration and state system legitimacy.Daniel Sharp - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):294-304.
  10.  43
    Homophobes, Racists, and the child’s right to be loved unconditionally.Riccardo Spotorno - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):109-132.
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  11.  16
    Introduction to the symposium: intentional citizenship and citizens’ remedial obligation to share the compensation burden.Jinyu Sun - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):244-250.
    In this introduction, I provide a brief overview of the main arguments defended by Avia Pasternak in her book, ‘Responsible Citizens, Non-Responsible States’ and summarise the critics she will confront from four political and legal theorists who work in the area of individual citizens’ responsibility for state wrongdoings.
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  12.  37
    Political Liberalism and Cognitive Disability: an Inclusive Account.Areti Theofilopoulou - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):224-243.
    In this paper, I argue that, contrary to what some critics suggest, political liberalism is not exclusionary with regards to the rights and interests of individuals with cognitive disabilities. I begin by defending four publicly justifiable reasons that are collectively sufficient for the inclusion of members of this group. Briefly, these are the epistemic uncertainty that inevitably exists about individuals’ actual capacities, the political liberal duty to treat parents fairly, the social framework that is required for the fulfilment of parental (...)
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  13.  6
    Political equality and institutional choice: lessons from Steffen Ganghof’s beyond parliamentarism and presidentialism.James Lindley Wilson - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):251-258.
    This comment encourages normative democratic theorists to attend to the agenda for democratic theory that Steffen Ganghof sets in Beyond Parliamentarism and Presidentialism. I discuss Ganghof’s distinction between ‘procedural’ and ‘process’ equality. I conclude with a meta-theoretical question about how theorists should think about advocacy for large-scale constitutional systems.
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  14.  17
    The roots (and routes) of the epistemology of ignorance.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):9-28.
    This paper elaborates on the idea of the epistemology of ignorance developed in Charles Mills’s work beginning in the 1980s and continuing throughout his writings. I I argue that his account developed initially from experiences of racism in north America as well as certain methods of organizing within parts of the Caribbean left. Essentially the epistemic practice of ignorance causes knowers to discredit or push away knowledge they in fact have. But this gives us cause for hope, for restoring existing (...)
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  15.  15
    A paradigm shift in normative political theory: grappling with Mills’s the racial contract 25 Years Later.Elvira Basevich - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):1-8.
    The late Charles W. Mills achieved public renown in North America and around the world that academics seldom achieve. His untimely death from cancer in 2021 was reported by The New York Times, Nati...
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  16.  10
    Do agent-neutral & agent-relative reasons have a place in the Racial Contract?Frank M. Kirkland - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):29-46.
    The reasons supporting the ‘Racial Contract’ are reasons supporting the ‘metanarrative,’ which explains the Racial Contract. They are not reasons supportive of actions pertinent to undoing the Racial Contract, but reasons supportive of behavior pertinent to objectively confirming the ‘metanarrative’ of the ‘Racial Contract’ and rightfully establishing its place in political philosophy. This paper shall attempt to address these matters and their consequences.
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  17.  6
    Mills, The racial contract and ideal theory.D. C. Matthew - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):47-61.
    Among mainstream political philosophers, Charles Mills is probably best known, not as the author of The Racial Contract, but for his long-running critique of ideal theory and Rawls for his association with it. Yet the critique of ideal theory that followed the publication of The Racial Contract is prefigured in that very work, where we find in inchoate form what would be further developed later on. In the book, this early formulation of the critique occupies a small part of a (...)
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  18.  12
    Charles Mills’ The Racial Contract at 25: Reconsiderations.Lucius T. Outlaw - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):62-77.
    Recosiderations of Charles Mills’ The Racial Contract a quarter-century after its initial publication and my first reading trouble previous assessments as my reengagement with the text brings to the fore several items of Mills’ authorial and critical agendas that are not easily reconciled, in the text or by my still sympathic reading.
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  19.  5
    Strategic ignorance, is it appropriate for indigenous resistance?Andrea Sullivan-Clarke - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (1):78-93.
    In The Racial Contract, Charles Mills introduces the notion of an ‘inverted epistemology,’ an epistemology that construes social and racial ignorance as knowledge (p.18). As Mills points out, such ignorance can be used to oppress people by creating alternate realities or ‘white mythologies’ about race (p. 19). If the racial contract results in a society that oppresses people of color and supports white supremacy, then the question of how to correct an inverted epistemology becomes critical. Mills proposes the correction of (...)
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  20. Does public justification face an ‘expert problem’? Some thoughts in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.Andrew Reid - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    Policies are often justified to the public with reference to factual claims that most people cannot easily verify or scrutinise because they lack relevant knowledge or expertise. This poses a challenge for theories of public justification which require that laws are justified using reasons that all can accept. Further difficulties arise in cases such as the response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic where the factual base of knowledge used to justify policies is limited, subject to a high degree of disagreement (...)
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