Year:

  1.  6
    ‘Revolutions, Philosophical as Well as Civil’: French Chemistry and American Science in Samuel Latham Mitchill’s Medical Repository.Thomas Apel - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (2):189-214.
    ABSTRACTFrom 1797 to 1801 a controversy played out on the pages of the Medical Repository, the first scientific journal published in the United States. At its centre was the well-known feud between the followers of Antoine Lavoisier and Joseph Priestley, the lone supporter of the phlogiston model. The American debate, however, had more than two sides. The Americans chemists, Samuel Latham Mitchill and Benjamin Woodhouse, who rushed to support Priestley did not defend his scientific views. Rather, as citizens of a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  2
    Atlantic Chemistries, 1600–1820.John R. R. Christie - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (2):135-138.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  3
    ‘Enquiries on Plaister of Paris’: A Material History of Early Agrochemical Knowledge in the United States of America, 1785–1812.Christopher Halm - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (2):169-188.
    ABSTRACTKey figures in the founding years of the United States of America were part of the first American learned agricultural society, known as the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture. Its members were georgic farmers who set out to describe, explore and explain agricultural processes by practical experiences, observations, and theories written in British books. Those theories, however, did not provide any reason for the widespread agricultural practice in Pennsylvania of using plaster as fertilizer, which was German in origin. Although imports (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  3
    Failed Utopias and Practical Chemistry: The Priestleys, the Du Ponts, and the Transmission of Transatlantic Science, 1770–1820.J. Marc Macdonald - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (2):215-252.
    ABSTRACTEighteenth-century events, replete with Dickensian dualities, brought two Enlightenment families to America. Pierre-Samuel du Pont and Joseph Priestley contemplated relocating their families decades before immigrating. After arriving, they discovered deficiencies in education and chemistry. Their experiences were indicative of the challenges in transmitting transatlantic chemistry. The Priestleys were primed to found an American chemical legacy. Science connected Priestley to British manufacturers, Continental chemists, and American statesmen. Priestley's marriage into the Wilkinson ironmaster dynasty, and Lunar Society membership, helped his sons apprentice, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    Alchemical and Paracelsian Ideas in the Arte de Los Metales.Mariana Sánchez Daza - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (2):139-154.
    ABSTRACTWhile the emergence of a new scientific culture in 16th-century Europe is well known, the role of the actors of the Hispanic New World in this time of renewal of knowledge has long been judged marginal for two reasons: first, because the strong presence of the Inquisition in the Hispanic World has been considered by historians to have been an obstacle for research or scientific innovation; and second, because the discontinuity of the territories of the Hispanic Monarchy and the problem (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  2
    Chemistry and Slavery in the Scottish Enlightenment.John Stewart - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (2):155-168.
    ABSTRACTThe Scottish Enlightenment has long been identified with abolitionism because of the writings of the moral and economic philosophers and the absence of slaves in Scotland itself. However, Scots were disproportionately represented in the ownership, management, and especially medical treatment of slaves in the British Caribbean. Sugar and cotton flowed into Glasgow and young, educated Scots looking for work as traders, bookkeepers, doctors made the return trip back to the Caribbean to manage the plantations. Chemically trained doctors and agriculturalists tested (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  1
    Preludes to the Inquisition: Self-Censorship in Medieval Astrological Discourse.Helena Avelar de Carvalho - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):10-25.
    ABSTRACTAstrologers have exercised self-censorship throughout the centuries in order to fend off criticism. This was largely for religious reasons, but social, political, and ethical motivations also have to be taken into account. This paper explores the main reasons that led astrologers to increase censorship in their writings in the decades that preceded the Church’s regulations and offers some examples of this self-imposed restraint in astrological judgements.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    Inquisition and Science: Where Do We Stand Now?Henrique Leitão - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):127-133.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  2
    Newtonianism and Information Control in Rome at the Wake of the Eighteenth Century.Daniele Macuglia - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):108-126.
    ABSTRACTThis paper offers an opportunity to ponder the way the Catholic Church and its methods of information control reshaped, and paradoxically even enabled, the dissemination and practice of science in early modern Italy. Focusing on the activities of Newtonian scholars operating in Rome in the First half of the eighteenth century – especially the Celestine monk Celestino Galiani and prelate Francesco Bianchini – I will argue that major contributions to the spread of Newtonianism in Italy came from individuals operating within (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  3
    The Bounded Heavens: Defining the Limits of Astrological Practice in the Iberian Indices.Luís Campos Ribeiro - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):50-70.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explores the rules for the expurgation of texts of astrology in the Iberian Indices of forbidden books. It addresses the prohibitions put forward in Rule IX of the Index of Trent and the bull Coeli et terrae of Sixtus V, and studies its impact on the rules and their interpretation in the Spanish and Portuguese Indices, in particular, those published in the first decades of the seventeenth century: the Spanish Index librorum prohibitorum et expurgatorum of 1612 and the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  2
    The Inquisition and the Censorship of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction.Francisco Malta Romeiras - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):1-9.
    ABSTRACTDuring the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Inquisition was the institution most invested in the censorship of printed books in the Portuguese empire. Besides publishing the Indices of Forbidden Books, the Holy Office was also responsible for overseeing their implementation and ensuring their efficacy in preventing the importation, reading, and circulation of banned books. Overall, the sixteenth-century Indices condemned 785 authors and 1081 titles, including 52 authors and 85 titles of medicine, natural history, natural philosophy, astronomy, chronology, cosmography, astrology, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  4
    Reconstructing Thomist Astrology: Robert Bellarmine and the Papal Bull Coeli Et Terrae.Neil Tarrant - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):26-49.
    ABSTRACTHistorians have portrayed the papal bull Coeli et terrae as a significant turning point in the history of the Catholic Church’s censorship of astrology. They argue that this bull was intended to prohibit the idea that the stars could naturally incline humans towards future actions, but also had the effect of preventing the discussion of other forms of natural astrology including those useful to medicine, agriculture, and navigation. The bull, therefore, threatened to overturn principles established by Thomas Aquinas, which not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  2
    On the Censorship of Tycho Brahe’s Books in Iberia.Luís Tirapicos - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (1):96-107.
    ABSTRACTIt is known that throughout the seventeenth century the world system proposed by Tycho Brahe assumed a preponderant position in the Iberian cosmological debate, according to many opinions the one showing the best agreement to empirical evidence. Moreover, the Tychonian model did not present the difficulties of apparent contradiction with scriptures, as the heliocentric system of Nicolaus Copernicus did, since it kept the earth fixed at the centre of the world. However, Tycho, as a Lutheran author, was targeted by the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues