5 found

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  1.  13
    How to Justify Mandatory Electoral Quotas: A Political Egalitarian Approach.Attila Mráz - 2021 - Legal Theory 27 (4):285-315.
    (OPEN ACCESS) This paper offers a novel substantive justification for mandatory electoral quotas—e.g., gender or racial quotas—and a new methodological approach to their justification. Substantively, I argue for a political egalitarian account of electoral quotas. Methodologically, based on this account and a political egalitarian grounding of political participatory rights, I offer an alternative to the External Restriction Approach to the justification of electoral quotas. The External Restriction Approach sees electoral quotas as at best justified restrictions on political participatory rights. I (...)
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  2.  4
    Objective Intentionalism and Disagreement.David Tan - 2021 - Legal Theory 27 (4):316-351.
    Intentionalist theories of legal interpretation are often divided between objectivist and subjectivist variants. The former take an interpretation to be correct depending on what the reasonable/rational lawmaker intended or what the reasonable/rational audience thinks they intended. The latter take an interpretation to be correct where the interpretation is what the speaker actually intended. This paper argues that objectivism faces serious problems as it cannot deal with disagreement: Reasonable and rational people can often disagree as to what the interpretation of a (...)
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  3.  1
    Freedom From Things: A Defense of the Disjunctive Obligation in Contract Law.Jennifer Nadler - 2021 - Legal Theory 27 (3):177-206.
    This article argues that the disjunctive obligation in contract law can be justified on moral grounds. It argues that from a perspective that regards human beings as free agents capable of choice and therefore independent of material objects, the contracting parties must be understood as agreeing to mutually guarantee one another's ownership of a certain value. This guarantee can be fulfilled either by handing over what was promised or by making up the difference between the market value and the contract (...)
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  4.  2
    Aa-Rm Wrestling: Comparing Analogical Approaches and Rule Models for Legal Reasoning.Adam Rigoni - 2021 - Legal Theory 27 (3):207-235.
    ABSTRACTLegal reasoning is commonly thought of as being based on either rules or analogies. More specifically, there is ongoing debate regarding whether precedential reasoning is best characterized as rule-based or analogical. This article continues that work by comparing recent and representative approaches from each camp, namely, Stevens's analogical model and the “rule-based” model of Horty and Rigoni. In the course of the comparison improvements on each approach are suggested and the improved models serve as the basis for the ultimate evaluation. (...)
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  5.  7
    Consent to Unjust Institutions.Bas van der Vossen - 2021 - Legal Theory 27 (3):236-251.
    John Rawls wrote that people can voluntarily acquire political obligations to institutions only on the condition that those institutions are at least reasonably just. When an institution is seriously unjust, by contrast, attempts to create political obligation are “void ab initio.” However, Rawls's own explanation for this thought was deeply problematic, as are the standard alternatives. In this paper, I offer an argument for why Rawls's intuition was right and trace its implications for theories of authority and political obligation. These, (...)
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