Year:

  1.  6
    The Experimental and the Empirical: Arne Naess' Statistical Approach to Philosophy.Siobhan Chapman - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):961-981.
    ABSTRACTExperimental philosophy often draws its data from questionnaire-based surveys of ordinary intuitions. Its proponents are keen to identify antecedents in the work of philosophers who have referred to intuition and everyday understanding [e.g. Knobe, Joshua, and Shaun Nichols, ‘An Experimental Philosophy Manifesto’. In Experimental Philosophy, edited by Joshua Knobe and Shaun Nichols, 3–14. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007]. In this context, ‘Empirical Semantics’, pioneered by Arne Naess early in the twentieth century, offers striking parallels. Naess believed that much contemporary philosophy (...)
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  2.  12
    The Curious Case of the Decapitated Frog: On Experiment and Philosophy.Alexander Klein - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):890-917.
    ABSTRACTPhysiologists have long known that some vertebrates can survive for months without a brain. This phenomenon attracted limited attention until the nineteenth century when a series of experiments on living, decapitated frogs ignited a controversy about consciousness. Pflüger demonstrated that such creatures do not just exhibit reflexes; they also perform purposive behaviours. Suppose one thinks, along with Pflüger's ally Lewes, that purposive behaviour is a mark of consciousness. Then one must count a decapitated frog as conscious. If one rejects this (...)
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  3.  16
    The Ordinary and the Experimental: Cook Wilson and Austin on Method in Philosophy.Guy Longworth - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):939-960.
    To what extent was ordinary language philosophy a precursor to experimental philosophy? Since the conditions on pursuit of either project are at best unclear, and at worst protean, the general question is hard to address. I focus instead on particular cases, seeking to uncover some central aspects of J. L. Austin’s and John Cook Wilson’s ordinary language based approach to philosophical method. I make a start at addressing three questions. First, what distinguishes their approach from other more traditional approaches? Second, (...)
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  4.  5
    Neo-Confucianism, Experimental Philosophy and the Trouble with Intuitive Methods.Hagop Sarkissian - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):812-828.
    ABSTRACTThe proper role of intuitions in philosophy has been debated throughout its history, and especially since the turn of the twenty-first century. The context of this recent debate within analytic philosophy has been the heightened interest in intuitions as data points that need to be accommodated or explained away by philosophical theories. This, in turn, has given rise to a sceptical movement called experimental philosophy, whose advocates seek to understand the nature and reliability of such intuitions. Yet such scepticism of (...)
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  5.  8
    Jane Addams as Experimental Philosopher.Joshua August Skorburg - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):918-938.
    ABSTRACTThis paper argues that the activist, feminist and pragmatist Jane Addams was an experimental philosopher. To defend this claim, I argue for capacious notions of both philosophical pragmatism and experimental philosophy. I begin in Section 2 with a new defence of Rose and Danks’ [‘In Defense of a Broad Conception of Experimental Philosophy’. Metaphilosophy 44, no. 4 : 512–32] argument in favour of a broad conception of experimental philosophy. Koopman [‘Pragmatist Resources for Experimental Philosophy: Inquiry in Place of Intuition’. Journal (...)
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  6.  12
    Experimental Philosophy and the History of Philosophy.Tom Sorell - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):829-849.
    ABSTRACTContemporary experimental philosophers sometimes use versions of an argument from the history of philosophy to defend the claim that what they do is philosophy. Although experimental philosophers conduct surveys and carry out what appear to be experiments in psychology, making them methodologically different from most analytic philosophers working today, techniques like theirs were not out of the ordinary in the philosophy of the past, early modern philosophy in particular. Or so some of them argue. This paper disputes the argument, citing (...)
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  7.  5
    The Experimental Physics of Jacques Rohault.Aaron Spink - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):850-870.
    ABSTRACTJacques Rohault is often considered to be one of the most meticulous followers of Descartes. Despite this, Rohault’s natural philosophy lacks much of the metaphysical bulwark that typifies Cartesian treatises of the seventeenth century. Instead, Rohault’s work, as well as his popular weekly meetings, strongly emphasized rigorous observation and experimentation. Traditionally, this emphasis on experiment over metaphysics is seen as a pragmatic omission to avoid the perils associated with censorship and Cartesian metaphysics. However, I find that the lack of explicit (...)
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  8.  16
    Madness as Method: On Locke’s Thought Experiments About Personal Identity.Kathryn Tabb - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):871-889.
    ABSTRACTJohn Locke is famous for popularizing the method of the philosophical thought experiment in discussions of personal identity; the cases introduced in the second edition of An Essay Concerning Understanding are still employed by contemporary philosophers. Here I argue that Locke’s method is nonetheless importantly different from later efforts in ways that can help us better appreciate his larger projects. Rather than pumping the reader’s intuitions in support of his preferred account, Locke’s thought experiments serve to illustrate common errors in (...)
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  9.  7
    The General Will and the Speech Community: British Idealism and the Foundations of Politics.Janusz Grygieńć - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):660-680.
    ABSTRACTAlthough the British Idealists did not provide a systematic account of language as a distinct philosophical phenomenon, language is nonetheless a fundamental element of Idealist social and political philosophy. This is seen mostly in the Idealist treatment of the concept of general will, which resulted in a Hegelian theory of community, constituted by shared understandings and a shared account of the common good and common interest. This article contains analysis of the relations between language and socio-political institutions in British Idealist (...)
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  10.  6
    Re-Enactment, Reconstruction and the Freedom of the Imagination: Collingwood on History and Art.Paul Guyer - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):738-758.
    ABSTRACTAn implication of Kant’s aesthetics is that the audience for art must be able to meet the free play of the imagination of the artist with free play of their own imagination in order to enjoy the work of art. Does Collingwood’s conception of the aesthetic audience’s ‘reconstruction’ of the imaginative work of the artist leave room for this thought? No, but his conception of the historian’s ‘re-enactment’ of the thought of the historical subjects suggests a model for this relation (...)
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  11.  15
    Taking Love Seriously: McTaggart, Absolute Reality and Chemistry.Saunders Joe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):719-737.
    ABSTRACTMcTaggart takes love seriously. He rejects rival accounts that look to reduce love to pleasure, moral approbation or a fitting response to someone’s qualities. In addition, he thinks that love reveals something about the structure of the universe, and that in absolute reality, we could all love each other. In this paper, I follow McTaggart in his rejection of rival accounts of love, but distance myself from his own account of love in absolute reality. I argue that in claiming that (...)
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  12.  6
    From the Bankruptcy of Relations to the Reality of Connections: Language and Semantics in Bradley and Bosanquet.Guillaume Lejeune - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):700-718.
    . From the bankruptcy of relations to the reality of connections: language and semantics in Bradley and Bosanquet. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 26, Special Issue: British Idealism: Language, Aesthetics and Emotions. Guest Editors: Colin Tyler and James Connelly, pp. 700-718.
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  13.  21
    Emotion and Satisfaction in the Philosophy of F. H. Bradley.W. J. Mander - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):681-699.
    ABSTRACTThe philosophers of the self-styled ‘revolution in philosophy’ that went on to become the contemporary analytic tradition started a rumour about the British Idealists that has persisted to this day. Finding neither the substance of the idealist case, nor the style of idealistic writing, congenial to their modern taste, these Edwardians hinted that their Victorian forbears had argued from emotion rather than reason. No single paper could address this accusation across the board, for the movement in its entirety, and so (...)
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  14.  2
    Language, Aesthetics and Emotions in the Work of the British Idealists.Colin Tyler & James Connelly - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):643-659.
    ABSTRACTThis article surveys and contextualizes the British idealists’ philosophical writings on language, aesthetics and emotions, starting with T. H. Green and concluding with Michael Oakeshott. It highlights ways in which their philosophical insights have been wrongly overlooked by later writers. It explores R. L. Nettleship’s posthumous publications in this field and notes that they exerted significant influences on British idealists and closely related figures, such as Bernard Bosanquet and R. G. Collingwood. The writing of other figures are also explored, not (...)
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  15.  2
    Thinking and Feeling in Actual Idealism.J. R. M. Wakefield - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):782-801.
    ABSTRACTIn La filosofia dell’arte, Giovanni Gentile assigned a prominent new role to the sentiments. This change struck some critics as a major departure from the earlier, classic accounts of actual idealism, in which Gentile argued that thought and language comprise the entirety of reality. Sentiments do not fit cleanly into a theory so narrowly concerned with thought and thinking. Their introduction, runs the objection, only compounds certain existing ambiguities in Gentile’s conception of the relation between mind and world. This article (...)
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  16.  13
    Feeling, Emotion and Imagination: In Defence of Collingwood's Expression Theory of Art.Nick Wiltsher - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):759-781.
    ABSTRACTIn ‘The Principles of Art’, R. G. Collingwood argues that art is the imaginative expression of emotion. So much the worse, then, for Collingwood. The theory seems hopelessly inadequate to the task of capturing art’s extension: of encompassing all the works we generally suppose should be rounded up under the concept. A great number of artworks, and several art forms, have nothing to do with emotion. But it would be surprising were Collingwood philistine enough to think that art is only (...)
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  17.  11
    The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious. [REVIEW]Mark Alfano - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):637-640.
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  18.  11
    Leibniz and the Environment. [REVIEW]Raphaële Andrault - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):619-622.
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  19.  7
    J. S. Mill’s Hedonism: Activism, Experientialism and Eudaimonism.Tim Beaumont - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):452-474.
    Many contemporary scholars defend the position that J. S. Mill was a ‘eudaimonist’, in a sense implying that he was not an ‘experiential’ hedonist. One ‘activist’ argument for this interpretation rests on the claim that Mill’s core axiological uses of ‘pleasure’ in Utilitarianism should be understood to refer to worthy or pleasurable activities rather than mental states. This paper offers a three-stage rebuttal of the activist interpretation. Firstly, in the Analysis, the Examination and the Logic, Mill explicitly identifies pleasures and (...)
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  20.  6
    Signs and Demonstration in Aristotle.Francesco Bellucci - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):410-428.
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  21.  18
    Two Notions of Intentional Action? Solving a Puzzle in Anscombe’s Intention.Lucy Campbell - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):578-602.
    The account of intentional action Anscombe provides in her Intention has had a huge influence on the development of contemporary action theory. But what is intentional action, according to Anscombe? She seems to give two different answers, saying first that they are actions to which a special sense of the question ‘Why?’ is applicable, and second that they form a sub-class of the things a person knows without observation. Anscombe gives no explicit account of how these two characterizations converge on (...)
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  22.  8
    Kants Theorie der Biologie: Ein Kommentar. Eine Lesart. Eine Historische Einordnung. [REVIEW]Andrew Cooper - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):625-630.
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  23.  10
    The Oxford Handbook of Hume. [REVIEW]Jonathan Cottrell - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):622-625.
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  24.  11
    Are Our Moral Responsibility Practices Justified? Wittgenstein, Strawson and Justification in ‘Freedom and Resentment’.Benjamin De Mesel - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):603-614.
    D. Justin Coates argues that, in ‘Freedom and Resentment’, P. F. Strawson develops a modest transcendental argument for the legitimacy of our moral responsibility practices. I disagree with Coates’ claim that Strawson’s argument provides a justification, in Wittgenstein’s and/or Strawson’s sense of that term, of our responsibility practices. I argue that my interpretation of Strawson solves some difficulties with Coates’ argument, while retaining its advantages.
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  25. Review of Margaret Cavendish, Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy, Edited by Eugene Marshall. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):617-9.
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  26.  6
    From Kant to Sade: A Fragment of the History of Philosophy in the Dialectic of Enlightenment.David James - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):557-577.
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  27.  4
    Hegel on Beauty. [REVIEW]Anton Kabeshkin - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):630-633.
  28.  5
    Kierkegaard on the (Un)Happiness of Faith.R. S. Kemp & Michael Mullaney - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):475-497.
    Hegel famously accuses Christianity of ‘unhappy consciousness’: it has a normative goal – union with the divine – that it cannot, in principle, satisfy. Kierkegaard was intimately aware of this criticism and, unlike some of Hegel’s other accusations, takes it seriously. In this paper my co-author and I investigate the way in which Kierkegaard addresses this issue in two texts published in 1843: Fear and Trembling and ‘The Expectancy of Faith’. We are especially interested in how the two texts describe (...)
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  29.  5
    Defining Human Sciences: Theodor Waitz’s Influence on Dilthey.Riccardo Martinelli - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):498-518.
    The work of Theodor Waitz is an important but hitherto unnoticed source of Dilthey’s concept of ‘human sciences’. Waitz was an outstanding philosopher and psychologist who, in the late 1850s, devoted himself wholeheartedly to empirical anthropology. In this field Waitz distinguished himself for his defence of the unity of humankind against mainstream polygenic and racial doctrines. Waitz inspired Dilthey’s articulation of psychology into two branches: the ‘descriptive’ one and the ‘explanative’ one. Even more remarkably, in a work reviewed by Dilthey (...)
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  30.  3
    Nicolaus Cusanus on Faith and the Intellect: A Case-Study in 15th-Century Fides-Ratio Controversy. [REVIEW]Clyde Lee Miller - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):615-617.
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  31.  13
    The Ad Hominem Argument of Berkeley’s Analyst.Clare Marie Moriarty - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):429-451.
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  32.  7
    ‘Meaning-Dawning’ in Wittgenstein’s Notebooks: A Kierkegaardian Reading and Critique.Genia Schönbaumsfeld - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):540-556.
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  33.  7
    On the Difficult Case of Loving Life: Plato's Symposium and Nietzsche's Eternal Recurrence.Melanie Shepherd - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):519-539.
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  34.  4
    L’Art de Romantiser le Monde: La Peinture de Caspar David Friedrich Et la Philosophie Romantique de Novalis. [REVIEW]Daniel Whistler - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):633-637.
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  35.  11
    Philosophy of Nature. [REVIEW]Gene Callahan - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):396-399.
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  36.  60
    Why the View of Intellect in De Anima I 4 Isn’T Aristotle’s Own.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):241-254.
    In De Anima I 4, Aristotle describes the intellect (nous) as a sort of substance, separate and incorruptible. Myles Burnyeat and Lloyd Gerson take this as proof that, for Aristotle, the intellect is a separate eternal entity, not a power belonging to individual humans. Against this reading, I show that this passage does not express Aristotle’s own views, but dialectically examines a reputable position (endoxon) about the intellect that seems to show that it can be subject to change. The passage’s (...)
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  37.  19
    Rationalizing Socrates’ Daimonion.Bridger Ehli - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):225-240.
    That Socrates took himself to possess a divine sign is well attested by ancient sources. Both Plato and Xenophon mention Socrates’ daimonion on numerous occasions. What is problematic for contemporary scholars is that Socrates unfailingly obeys the warnings of his sign. Scholars have worried that Socrates seems to ascribe greater epistemic authority to his sign than his own critical reasoning. Moreover, he never so much as questions the authority of his sign to guide his actions, much less its divine nature. (...)
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  38. Wittgenstein’s Influence on Austin’s Philosophy of Language.Daniel W. Harris & Elmar Unnsteinsson - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):371-395.
    Many philosophers have assumed, without argument, that Wittgenstein influenced Austin. More often, however, this is vehemently denied, especially by those who knew Austin personally. We compile and assess the currently available evidence for Wittgenstein’s influence on Austin’s philosophy of language. Surprisingly, this has not been done before in any detail. On the basis of both textual and circumstantial evidence we show that Austin’s work demonstrates substantial engagement with Wittgenstein’s later philosophy. In particular, Austin’s 1940 paper, ‘The Meaning of a Word’, (...)
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  39.  34
    Schopenhauer on the Aimlessness of the Will.Christopher Janaway - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):331-347.
    Schopenhauer asserts that ‘the will, which is objectified in human life as it is in every appearance, is a striving without aim and without end’. The article rejects some recent readings of this claim, and offers the following positive interpretation: however many specific aims of my specific desires I manage to attain, none is a final aim, in the sense that none terminates my ‘willing as a whole’, none turns me into a non-willing being. To understand Schopenhauer’s claim we must (...)
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  40.  10
    Conceiving Existence: On Hume’s Argument Against the Distinctness of the Idea of Existence.Asher Jiang - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):297-316.
    There are two questions concerning Hume’s doctrine of existence which have not yet found any persuasive answer: What is his argument in favour of the thesis that there is no distinct idea of existence? What are the semantic and metaphysical consequences of this thesis within his philosophical framework? This paper mainly aims to answer question. In order to do that, I will first explain why some reconstructions suggested by interpreters such as Cummins and Bricke are problematic. One of them relies (...)
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  41.  86
    Kant and the Foundations of Morality. [REVIEW]Samuel Kahn - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):403-405.
  42.  7
    Carving, Taming or Gardening? Plutarch on Emotions, Reason and Virtue.David Machek - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):255-275.
    This article attempts to provide an overview and discussion of Plutarch’s views in his Moralia about emotions and their relation to moral virtue and reason. By tracking different clusters of imagery – artisanal, zoological and botanic – that Plutarch uses in his essays to articulate the relationship between emotions and reason, it explores three philosophical perspectives on emotions: emotions of a virtuous person are likened to a well-shaped piece of material; to animals that need to be guided or reined in (...)
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  43.  10
    Marsilius of Padua and Peter of Abano: The Scientific Foundations of Law-Making in Defensor Pacis.Alessandro Mulieri - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):276-296.
    This article shows that a forgotten source of Marsilius’ scientia of law-making in the Defensor Pacis is the Lucidator, the main astrological work of Peter of Abano. A compared analysis of these two works demonstrates that the theories of experientia and scientia that Marsilius considers necessary to make laws in the first dictio of the Defensor Pacis entirely draw on Peter of Abano’s views on the epistemological status of ‘the science of the stars’. It is shown that the purpose of (...)
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  44.  18
    Is Shepherd's Pen Mightier Than Berkeley's Word?Samuel C. Rickless - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):317-330.
    In 1827, Lady Mary Shepherd published Essays on the Perception of an External Universe, which offers both an argument for the existence of a world of external bodies existing outside our minds and a criticism of Berkeley's argument for idealism in A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. In this paper, I evaluate Margaret Atherton's criticisms of Shepherd's case against Berkeley, and provide reasons for thinking that, although Shepherd's particular criticisms of Berkeley do not succeed, she correctly identifies an (...)
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  45.  7
    Hobbes and Modern Political Thought. [REVIEW]G. A. J. Rogers - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):401-403.
  46.  8
    Bayle, Jurieu, and the ‘Dictionnaire Historique Et Critique’. [REVIEW]Felix Waldmann - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):399-401.
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  47.  3
    French Philosophy, 1572–1675. [REVIEW]Joseph Anderson - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):208-209.
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  48.  14
    The Mind–Body Problem and the Role of Pain: Cross-Fire Between Leibniz and His Cartesian Readers.Raphaële Andrault - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):25-45.
    This article is about the exchanges between Leibniz, Arnauld, Bayle and Lamy on the subject of pain. The inability of Leibniz’s system to account for the phenomenon of pain is a recurring objection of Leibniz’s seventeenth-century Cartesian readers to his hypothesis of pre-established harmony: according to them, the spontaneity of the soul and its representative nature cannot account for the affective component of pain. Strikingly enough, this problem has almost never been addressed in Leibniz studies, or only incidentally, through the (...)
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  49.  15
    Twenty-Five Years of the British Journal for the History of Philosophy.Michael Beaney - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):1-10.
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  50.  7
    Conflict, Consensus, and Liberty in J. S. Mill’s Representative Democracy.Gustavo Hessmann Dalaqua - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):110-130.
    The relationship between representative democracy and conflict in John Stuart Mill’s political philosophy has been interpreted in very different ways. While some scholars claim that Millian democracy is incompatible with political conflict, others identify in Mill a radical political agonism that would offer a non-consensual model of deliberative democracy. This paper argues that neither of these views is exactly accurate: although he highlights the centrality of conflict in political life, Mill believes that democratic deliberation presupposes a minimal level of consensus (...)
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  51.  15
    Bentham’s Binary Form of Maximizing Utilitarianism.Johan E. Gustafsson - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):87-109.
    Jeremy Bentham is often interpreted as defending a satisficing, rather than maximizing, version of utilitarianism, where an act is right as long as it produces more pleasure than pain. This lack of maximization is surprising given Bentham’s maximizing slogan ‘the greatest happiness of the greatest number’. Against the satisficing interpretation, I argue that Bentham consistently defends a maximizing version of utilitarianism, where an act’s consequences are compared to those of not performing the act. I show that following this version of (...)
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  52.  30
    Kants Ontologie der Raumzeitlichen Wirklichkeit: Versuch Einer Anti-Realistischen Interpretation der Kritik der Reinen Vernunft. [REVIEW]Wolfgang Ertl - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):218-221.
  53.  9
    Adorno and Schelling on the Art–Nature Relation.Camilla Flodin - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):176-196.
    When it comes to the relationship between art and nature, research on Adorno’s aesthetics usually centres on his discussion of Kant and Hegel. While this reflects Adorno’s own position – his comprehension of this relationship is to a large extent developed through a critical re-reading of both the Kantian and the Hegelian position – I argue that we are able to gain important insights into Adorno’s aesthetics and the central art–nature relation by reading his ideas in the light of Schelling’s (...)
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  54.  10
    Mary Astell’s Theory of Spiritual Friendship.Nancy Kendrick - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):46-65.
    Mary Astell’s theory of friendship has been interpreted either as a version of Aristotelian virtue friendship, or as aligned with a Christian and Platonist tradition. In this paper, I argue that Astell’s theory of friendship is determinedly anti-Aristotelian; it is a theory of spiritual friendship offered as an alternative to Aristotelian virtue friendship. By grounding her conception of friendship in a Christian–Platonist metaphysics, I show that Astell rejects the Aristotelian criteria of reciprocity and partiality as essential features of the friendship (...)
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  55.  4
    Dictionnaire des Philosophes Français du XVIIe Siècle. Acteurs Et Réseaux de Savoir. [REVIEW]Mogens Lærke - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):209-215.
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  56.  14
    Monads at the Bottom, Monads at the Top, Monads All Over.Ohad Nachtomy - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):197-207.
    This paper examines a widely accepted reading of monads as the most fundamental elements of reality. Garber [Leibniz – Body, Substance, Monad, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009] argues that simple monads – seen as mind-like atoms without parts and extension – replace the corporeal substance of Leibniz’s middle period. Phemister [Leibniz and the Natural World – Activity, Passivity and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz’s Philosophy, Dordrecht: Springer, 2005] argues that monads figure also at the top as complete corporeal substances. Building on (...)
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  57.  19
    Habit and Time in Nineteenth-Century French Philosophy: Albert Lemoine Between Bergson and Ravaisson.Mark Sinclair - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):131-153.
    This paper shows how reflection on habit leads in nineteenth-century French philosophy to Henri Bergson’s idea of duration in 1888 as a non-quantifiable dimension irreducible to time as measured by clocks. Historically, I show how Albert Lemoine’s 1875 L’habitude et l’instinct was crucial, since he holds – in a way that is both Ravaissonian and Bergsonian avant la lettre – that for the being capable of habit, the three elements of time are fused together. For that habituated being, Lemoine claims, (...)
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  58.  4
    Plotinus’ Concept of Matter in Giordano Bruno’s De la Causa, Principio Et Uno.Giannis Stamatellos - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):11-24.
    The aim of this paper is to focus on the reception of Plotinus’ concept of matter in the Renaissance philosopher Giordano Bruno and his early Italian dialogue De la causa, principio et uno. I argue that Bruno’s concept of materia in De la causa, principio et uno reflects Plotinus’ theory of intelligible matter in Ennead ii 4 [12] 2–5 as well as Plotinus’ positive view of the perceptible world in Enneads ii 9 [33] and iv 8 [6]. It is suggested (...)
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  59.  14
    Kant’s Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume. [REVIEW]Robert Watt - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):215-218.
  60.  35
    Kant on the Original Synthesis of Understanding and Sensibility.Jessica J. Williams - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):66-86.
    In this paper, I propose a novel interpretation of the role of the understanding in generating the unity of space and time. On the account I propose, we must distinguish between the unity that belongs to determinate spaces and times – which is a result of category-guided synthesis and which is Kant’s primary focus in §26 of the B-Deduction, including the famous B160–1n – and the unity that belongs to space and time themselves as all-encompassing structures. Non-conceptualist readers of Kant (...)
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  61.  10
    Kidnapping an Ugly Child: Is William James a Pragmaticist?Neil W. Williams - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):154-175.
    Since the term ‘pragmatism’ was first coined, there have been debates about who is or is not a ‘real’ pragmatist, and what that might mean. The division most often drawn in contemporary pragmatist scholarship is between William James and Charles Peirce. Peirce is said to present a version of pragmatism which is scientific, logical and objective about truth, whereas James presents a version which is nominalistic, subjectivistic and leads to relativism. The first person to set out this division was in (...)
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  62.  21
    On the Motivations for Merleau-Ponty’s Ontological Research.Dimitris Apostolopoulos - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy (2):348-370.
    This paper attempts to clarify Merleau-Ponty’s later work by tracing a hitherto overlooked set of concerns that were of key consequence for the formulation of his ontological research. I argue that his ontology can be understood as a response to a set of problems originating in reflections on the intersubjective use of language in dialogue, undertaken in the early 1950s. His study of dialogue disclosed a structure of meaning-formation and pointed towards a theory of truth (both recurring ontological topics) that (...)
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