8 found

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  1.  1
    Returning to the Heavens: Plato’s Socrates on Anaxagoras and Natural Philosophy.Samuel Ortencio Flores - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):123-146.
    Readers of Plato since antiquity have generally taken Socrates’ intellectual autobiography in the Phaedo as a signal of his turn away from the study of natural philosophy. They have turned instead to characters such as Timaeus for evidence of Plato’s pursuit of physics. This article argues that Plato’s Socrates himself developed a philosophy of nature in his criticism of Anaxagoras and his subsequent philosophic pursuits. Socrates’ autobiography places the study of nature in a foundational position within the development of his (...)
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  2.  1
    Anaximenes’ Ἀήρ as Generating Mist and Generated Air.Pavel Hobza - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):97-122.
    Anaximenes is usually considered to be a material monist recognizing transparent atmospheric air as a principle. In the cosmogonic explanation of the origin of the earth and the heavenly bodies, the Greek term ἀήρ turns out to mean rather ‘opaque damp mist’. However, Not only does it accord with archaic usage, but also with how it was used in his mentor, Anaximander. Yet, in cosmology ἀήρ means ‘air’ serving as stuff on which the earth and the heavenly bodies float. Hence, (...)
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  3. Reassessing Epictetus’ Opinion of Divination.Erlend D. MacGillivray - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):147-160.
    In recent years substantial effort has been expended by scholars to better understand the nature of the ancient interest in divination. This study will argue that the Stoic philosopher Epictetus’ views of divination have been largely overlooked and mistakenly defined by his modern interpreters. While often portrayed as being opposed to the art, it is proposed that he envisages divination can be beneficially employed: namely in highlighting certain moral actions, and in motivating individuals to commence philosophical study.
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  4.  6
    Philebus 11b: Good or the Good.George Rudebusch - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):161-185.
    The sentence setting the stage for the philosophical investigation within the Philebus is, naively translated, “He says that to enjoy is good.” Instead of the predicate adjective “good,” most interpreters prefer to translate with a definite description, “the good,” with consequences that affect the interpretation of the dialogue as a whole. Part one defends the naïve translation, both in the context of Socrates’ first seven speeches and viewing the dialogue as a whole. Part two considers and rejects the reasons given (...)
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  5.  7
    Kalokagathia and the Unity of the Virtues in the Eudemian Ethics.Giulia Bonasio - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):27-57.
    In this paper, I argue that in the Eudemian Ethics, Aristotle proposes a strong version of the unity of the virtues. Evidence in favor of this strong version of the unity of the virtues results from reading the common books within the EE rather than as part of the Nicomachean Ethics. The unity of the virtues as defended in the EE includes not only practical wisdom and the character virtues, but also all the virtues of practical and theoretical thinking. Closely (...)
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  6.  1
    Why Mathematical Probability Failed to Emerge From Ancient Gambling.Stephen Kidd - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):1-25.
    The emergence of mathematical probability has something to do with dice games: all the early discussions suggest as much. Although this has long been recognized, the problem is that gambling at dice has been a popular pastime since antiquity. Why, then, did gamblers wait until the sixteenth century ce to calculate the math of dicing? Many theories have been offerred, but there may be a simple solution: early-modern gamblers played different sorts of dice games than in antiquity. While ancients diced (...)
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  7.  1
    Was Plato an Eristic According to Isocrates?Geneviève Lachance - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):81-96.
    The article examines the passages in Isocrates’ Corpus containing a description and a critique of a new type of sophistic called “eristic”. Based on the chronology of Isocrates’ discourses and the description he gave, the author shows that the majority of these passages could not have aimed at Plato as its sole or principal target. However, it should not be excluded that Isocrates’ criticism of eristics was directed against various members of the Socratic circle, a heterogeneous group in which Plato (...)
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  8.  20
    Between Rhetoric and Sophistry: The Puzzling Case of Plato’s Gorgias.Jacqueline Tusi - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):59-80.
    The case of Gorgias’ profession has been an object of ongoing dispute among scholars. This is mainly because in some dialogues Plato calls Gorgias a rhetorician, in others a sophist. The purpose of this article is to show that a solution only emerges in the Gorgias, where Plato presents Gorgias’ goals as a rhetorician and its associated arts. On this basis, Plato introduces a systematic division between genuine arts and fake arts, including rhetoric and sophistry, thereby identifying their conceptual differences (...)
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