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  1.  7
    On the Virtual Expression of Emotion in Writing.Trip Glazer - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):177-194.
    Richard Wollheim claims that speech acts express emotions always in virtue of how they are said and never solely in virtue of what they say. However, it would seem to follow that we cannot express our emotions in writing, since texts preserve what we wish to say without recording how we would wish to say it. I argue that Wollheim’s thesis in fact sheds new light on how authors can and do express their emotions in writing. In short, an author (...)
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  2.  7
    ‘Pure Showing’ and Anti-Humanist Musical Profundity.Owen Hulatt - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):195-210.
    In this paper I argue that Peter Kivy’s contention that music is incapable of profundity is correct only in a limited sense. So long as we associate profundity with depth of subject matter, even the revisions proposed by Stephen Davies and Julian Dodd are incapable of delivering an account of musical profundity which has the correct scope. Theories of profundity based on criteria of exemplification and non-denotational expression of content remain vulnerable to Kivy’s well-chosen counter-examples of non-profound artworks which meet (...)
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  3.  6
    The Virtue of Subtlety and the Vice of a Heavy Hand.Alex King - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):119-137.
    Subtlety is a concept as deeply intertwined with aesthetic judgements as virtually any other. But it is not clear what makes subtlety a good property of an artwork, or indeed if it is one. In this paper, I explore this under-discussed issue. First, I spend some time setting out hallmarks of subtlety and discussing different ways in which subtlety might be valuable. I then go on to defend a particular view about why subtlety is aesthetically valuable, by thinking through why (...)
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  4.  3
    Meanings of Art: Essays in Aesthetics.Mark Packer - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):234-237.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comMeanings of Art is an engaging collection of essays that covers a broad spectrum of topics, ranging from the philosophy of literature to neuro-aesthetics. Emerging sporadically over the course of 20 years, the stand-alone essays that comprise this volume display little evidence of a sustained, systematic thesis. But this is part of what constitutes the (...)
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  5.  2
    De Gustibus: Arguing About Art and Why We Do It.Shelley James - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):237-239.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comIf you are philosophically uncurious or have no aesthetic life, Peter Kivy’s new book may not be for you. Otherwise you owe it to yourself to read it. Kivy’s question—why we argue about art—has received scant philosophical attention, yet the slightest philosophy is all you need to motivate it. Though aesthetic disputes are, as Kivy (...)
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  6.  6
    The Fine Arts Reduced to a Single Principle.Shiner Larry - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):231-234.
    The Fine Arts Reduced to a Single PrincipleBatteuxCharlesoup. 2015. pp. 151. £40.00.
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  7.  3
    Was Hanslick a Closet Schopenhauerian?Tiago Sousa - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):211-229.
    A common tendency throughout the history of thought concerning the nature of music has been to attribute to it a peculiar power to represent the dynamic of the universe. The tradition has perhaps its most developed expression in the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer. The strict formalism present in Eduard Hanslick’s treatise, On the Musically Beautiful, clearly stands in stark opposition to such ways of thinking. And yet the book’s final paragraph ends with a paragraph in which music is referred to (...)
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  8.  17
    On Fictional Characters as Types.Enrico Terrone - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):161-176.
    Conceiving of fictional characters as types allows us to reconcile intuitions of sameness and difference about characters such as Batman that appear in different fictional worlds. Sameness occurs at the type level while difference occurs at the token level. Yet, the claim that fictional characters are types raises three main issues. Firstly, types seem to be eternal forms whereas fictional characters seem to be the outcome of a process of creation. Secondly, the tokens of a type are concrete particulars in (...)
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  9.  4
    The Sublime in Schopenhauer’s Philosophy.Woods David - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):239-244.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comBefore even opening the pages of Bart Vandenabeele’s The Sublime in Schopenhauer’s Philosophy, it is an encouraging sight to behold. For, there are surprisingly few single-author monographs focused solely on Schopenhauer’s aesthetic philosophy, at least in the Anglophone literature—much less on Schopenhauer’s theory of the sublime in particular, as is rightfully boasted in the blurb (...)
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  10.  7
    Philosophy of Song and Singing: An Introduction.M. Bernhardt Laura - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):109-111.
    Philosophy of Song and Singing: An Introduction Jeanette Bicknellroutledge. 2015. pp. 140. £29.99.
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  11.  4
    Replies to My Critics.Bonds Mark Evan - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):97-101.
    I would like to thank the Editors of the British Journal of Aesthetics for organizing this symposium and the participants for their thoughtful comments. It is gratifying to see that my book has elicited such a wide range of responses.
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  12.  2
    Synopsis.Bonds Mark Evan - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):67-69.
    BondsMark Evan, Absolute Music: The History of an Idea, Oxford: OUP, 2014. pp. 375. £23.99.
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  13.  5
    Musical Concerns: Essays in Philosophy of Music.John M. Carvalho - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):111-114.
    Musical Concerns: Essays in Philosophy of Music JERROLD LEVINSONoup. 2015. pp. 192. £25.00.
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  14.  49
    Reasoned and Unreasoned Judgement: On Inference, Acquaintance and Aesthetic Normativity.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):1-17.
    Aesthetic non-inferentialism is the widely-held thesis that aesthetic judgements either are identical to, or are made on the basis of, sensory states like perceptual experience and emotion. It is sometimes objected to on the basis that testimony is a legitimate source of such judgements. Less often is the view challenged on the grounds that one’s inferences can be a source of aesthetic judgements. This paper aims to do precisely that. According to the theory defended here, aesthetic judgements may be unreasoned, (...)
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  15.  9
    No Hugging, No Learning: The Limitations of Humour.Cochrane Tom - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):51-66.
    I claim that the significance of comic works to influence our attitudes is limited by the conditions under which we find things funny. I argue that we can only find something funny if we regard it as norm-violating in a way that doesn’t make certain cognitive or pragmatic demands upon us. It is compatible with these conditions that humour reinforces our attitude that something is norm-violating. However, it is not compatible with these conditions that, on the basis of finding it (...)
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  16.  2
    Absolute Programme Music.Dammann Guy - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):71-75.
    Mark Evan Bonds’ recent book, Absolute Music, deepens considerably the historical context within which Eduard Hanslick’s famous treatise on musical beauty can be read. This paper argues that, with the aid of this expanded context, we can understand Hanslick’s treatise to have provided contemporary and subsequent audiences with a kind of meta-programme for listening to symphonic and other non-texted music. That is to say, Hanslick’s text arguably informed and directed the way audiences came to listen to instrumental music by furnishing (...)
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  17.  5
    Two Debates About Absolute Music.Hannah Ginsborg - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):77-80.
    Mark Evan Bonds makes a distinction between two concepts of absolute music: as repertory, and as ‘regulative concept’. This paper explores the distinction, and distinguishes further two debates associated with these two concepts: one about the value of absolute music in the repertory sense, the other about the extent to which music is ‘absolute’ in the sense of lacking expressive or representational content. It ends with a proposal about how reflection on the first debate can help provide a resolution of (...)
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  18.  6
    Hanslick’s Deleted Ending.Christoph Landerer & Nick Zangwill - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):85-95.
    We question Mark Evan Bonds’ interpretation of the deleted ending of Eduard Hanslick’s On the Musically Beautiful. We argue that there is no evidence that it reveals a commitment to Pythagoreanism or Idealism. We supply an alternative explanation of the deletion.
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  19.  7
    Absolute Music as Ontology or Experience.Tamara Levitz - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):81-84.
    In Absolute Music: The History of an Idea, Mark Evan Bonds presents a magisterial history of absolute music—a term Richard Wagner first coined in 1846, and yet which Bonds believes existed as an ‘idea’ going all the way back to Ancient Greece. Drawing primarily on the work of new musicologists in the United States in the 1980s as his point of departure, Bonds defines absolute music as a ‘regulative concept’ that allows him to discuss the ‘relationship between music’s perceived essence (...)
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  20.  11
    Principles of Art History: The Problem of the Development of Style in Early Modern Art.Bence Nanay - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):106-109.
    Principles of Art History: The Problem of the Development of Style in Early Modern Art Heinrich Wölfflingetty research institute. 2015. pp. 356. £20.00.
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  21.  11
    The Uses of Aesthetic Testimony.C. Thi Nguyen - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):19-36.
    The current debate over aesthetic testimony typically focuses on cases of doxastic repetition — where, when an agent, on receiving aesthetic testimony that p, acquires the belief that p without qualification. I suggest that we broaden the set of cases under consideration. I consider a number of cases of action from testimony, including reconsidering a disliked album based on testimony, and choosing an artistic educational institution from testimony. But this cannot simply be explained by supposing that testimony is usable for (...)
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  22.  4
    Musical Quotations and Shostakovich’s Secret: A Response to Kivy.Kalle Puolakka - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):37-50.
    Peter Kivy has argued that scholars of the music of Dimitri Shostakovich are misguided when they make interpretations that attribute complex extra-musical content to works of his that bear no indications of such content, such as a title or an explicitly announced programme. Upon Kivy’s account, such works should rather be approached in terms of absolute music. In this paper, I show some decisive weaknesses in this critique. Drawing on the relevant philosophical literature, I examine Shostakovich’s use of musical quotations—an (...)
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  23.  21
    The Deformity-Related Conception of Ugliness.Panos Paris - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics (2):1-22.
    Ugliness is a neglected topic in contemporary analytic aesthetics. This is regrettable given that this topic is not just genuinely fascinating, but could also illuminate other areas in the field, seeing as ugliness, albeit unexplored, does feature rather prominently in several debates in aesthetics. This paper articulates a ‘deformity-related’ conception of ugliness. Ultimately, I argue that deformity, understood in a certain way, and displeasure, jointly suffice for ugliness. First, I motivate my proposal, by locating a ‘deformity-related’ conception of ugliness in (...)
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