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  1. Ars Moriendi: Of Course, I Must Polish My Shoes.Mario O. D'Souza - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    I first found out that I have cancer, and the level of its severity and advanced stage, on the 11th of July, 2017. I had some symptoms like shortness of breath and fatigue, but I attributed them to a pill that I was taking, and which could produce similar side-effects. Subsequent visits to the doctors show that it is in its final stage.
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  2. Charles Taylor’s Modern Identity and the “Atonement Muddle”.James Gerrie - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    In Charles Taylor’s exhaustive study of the historical currents that have helped constitute the modern identity he proposes the notion of “the affirmation of ordinary life” as a way of encapsulating the core of that identity. As he states in Sources of the Self, “ordinary life is a term of art I introduce to designate those aspects of human life concerned with production, that is, labour, the making of things needed for life, and our life as sexual beings, including marriage (...)
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  3. On Kant On the Idea of God.Garth W. Green - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    In the following essay, I consider the character, and implications, of the idea of God in Kant’s theoretical philosophy. I first consider the idea of God in the Critique of Pure Reason, in which it is first established within the systematic structure of Kant’s critical philosophy. In this context, I show that Kant recognized, depicted, and subjected to critique not one, but two such ideas or concepts of God: to evince this point, I examine the more thorough treatment of the (...)
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    Augustine’s ‘Si Comprehendis, Non Est Deus’ – To What Extent is God Incomprehensible?Jean Grondin - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    The idea of God is one from which contemporary philosophy, to say nothing of Western society at large, seems to have turned away from or replaced by other quests. There is however no greater and more vital subject than the idea of God. It is essential because it is difficult to see how life can have an overriding meaning if there is no God. Or, as Ivan Karamazov puts it in Dostoyevsky’s novel, if there is no God, all hell breaks (...)
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  5. The Idea of God: On the Divine Names.Peter Harris - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    In this paper I intend to look at a debate arising in the early Middle Ages which focused on the divine names. The topic was so formulated in the 6th century by the writer who came to be known as the “pseudo-Dionysius” who was in fact a theological writer in the neo-Platonic tradition in the early 6th century whose theological/mystical writings were very influential in the 13th century theological debates. I will refer to him simply as Dionysius. Among his writings (...)
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  6. Review of Riccardo Saccenti’s Debating Medieval Natural Law: A Survey. [REVIEW]Peter Karl Koritansky - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    In this short monograph, Riccardo Saccenti surveys the various and competing interpretations of natural law and natural right from the late Middle Ages through the modern period. As “a survey,” the intention of this book is not so much to advance and defend a central thesis about natural law, but rather to paint a picture of how the various interpreters of natural law have responded to the most important primary texts and to one another. One of the issues with which (...)
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  7. Levinas’ God: Ethical Horizon, Political Necessity.Joël Madore - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    The idea of God in Levinas is resonant of the First Testament: a voice from higher above that clamors: Thou shall not kill; the unsettling call of the Infinite that commands us to leave the familiar towards the unknown, like “Abraham’s journey who left alone, towards all—from particularity to universality—under the threat of nights and the hope of days, in the words of Maurice Blanchot. Hard, long path of justice.”1 God in Levinas thus echoes the Kantian practical postulates, framing the (...)
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  8. Populism and the Late Schelling on Mythology, Ideology, and Revelation.Sean McGrath - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    Revelation according to Schelling is not the possession of any institutional form of Christianity; it is not even bound to faith or confession. Rather, revelation disseminates itself freely and universally throughout history. It now inextricably permeates modernity. Schelling’s Philosophy of Revelation does not look backwards to an event in the first century of the common era, it looks forward to the genuine singularity, the moment when humanity will become adequate to the divine subjectivity which lives in it, that is, the (...)
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  9. The Ideas of God and Self Within a Phenomenology of Body.Michelle Rebidoux - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    Were I to give this paper a subtitle, it would be: “Revisiting the metaphor of the body as house”; and if I were to give it a sub-subtitle, it would be: “The back door, the front door, the bedroom, and the hole in the roof.” In the end I decided not to add these sub-titles, not only for the sake of sheer titular manageability, but also because, in doing so, a certain dualism of body and soul or spirit1 might be (...)
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  10. Nietzsche and the Idea of God: Is God Good or Bad for Your Psychological Health?David Leo Tracey - 2017 - Analecta Hermeneutica 9.
    Nietzsche tells us that he is more interested in the idea of God than in God as such. The idea of God is not a mind-independent entity; it is a human idea. He writes: “In former times, one sought to prove that there is no God—today one indicates how the belief that there is a God could arise and how this belief acquired its weight and importance.”1 He continues, “The ‘kingdom of heaven’ is a state of the heart—not something lying (...)
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