25 found

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  1.  2
    Frank M. Oppenheim, SJ: A Celebration of His Life and Legacy.Michael Brodrick & David W. Rodick - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):1.
    Frank Mathias Oppenheim was born in Coldwater, Ohio, on May 18, 1925, and studied at Xavier, Loyola, and Saint Louis Universities. He joined the Chicago Province of the Jesuit Order in 1942 and was ordained on June 15, 1955. He is the author of four books on Josiah Royce’s philosophy: Royce’s Journey Down Under, Royce’s Mature Philosophy of Religion, Royce’s Mature Ethics, and Reverence for the Relations of Life: Re-Imagining Pragmatism via Josiah Royce’s Interactions with Peirce, James, and Dewey, in (...)
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  2. Was Royce Christian?John Clendenning - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):12.
    All of those acquainted with the philosophy of Josiah Royce know that he was—in both thought and person—intensely religious, but no one has explored this subject more profoundly and fruitfully than Frank Oppenheim. Throughout his scholarly career—spanning more than a half-century—Oppenheim has illuminated, more fully than any of his predecessors, the essential “Christian doctrine of life” that Royce professed: the interlaced triad of Loyalty, the Beloved Community, and the Realm of Grace. In what follows, I do not dispute Oppenheim’s interpretation (...)
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  3.  1
    The Critically Loyal Interpreter: Oppenheim on Royce's Philosophy of Religion.Robin Friedman - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):23.
    Over the course of a fifty-year scholarly career, Frank M. Oppenheim, SJ, has devotedly studied and encouraged others to study the American philosopher Josiah Royce. Early in my own study of Royce, I read and learned a great deal from Oppenheim’s book Reverence for the Relations of Life. I met Oppenheim at a 2007 conference at Harvard on Royce and William James, and he encouraged my continued study. Thus, I am honored to participate in this issue of The Pluralist celebrating (...)
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  4.  1
    Royce on the Rivalry Between Buddhism and Christianity.David K. Glidden - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):45.
    Within an interpretive community, conversation will not cease until voices are silenced by circumstance.1 Less than three months after lecturing at Lake Forest College in November of 1911, Royce suffered a stroke.2 Within a year, Royce had adequately recovered and recuperated, so as to redouble his preparations for a lecture series on Christianity, initially presented in part at the Lowell Institute and then in a more completed version at Oxford. These lectures would come to constitute The Problem of Christianity.3 Publication (...)
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  5. Reverence for the Relations of Life as a Source of Royce's Ethical Insights.Richard P. Mullin - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):72.
    Fr. Frank Oppenheim’s contribution to the revitalization of Royce’s philosophy is universally acknowledged. Of the many aspects of Royce’s thought that Oppenheim revealed and thoughtfully interpreted, this essay focuses on a relatively underdeveloped phrase that became a title of Oppenheim’s 2005 book, Reverence for the Relations of Life. The context of this phrase constitutes Royce’s assessment of why some communities in early California endured, while others, which seemed to thrive for a limited time, turned into ghost towns. Royce concluded that (...)
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  6.  3
    Introduction: “Process” in Royce's Late Philosophy.Frank M. Oppenheim - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):8.
    First, I offer an introduction to set the context suited for scholars engaged in studies of Josiah Royce, focusing upon how “process” operates in Royce’s late philosophy. After that, I want to offer signposts to inform Royce scholars about several paths of possible future research.For students of Royce’s late philosophy, frequent encounters with the terms “Community” and “the Holy Spirit” may seem indeed to overshadow the usage of the term “process.” Granted, the index of Royce’s Problem of Christianity cites ten (...)
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  7.  1
    What It Means to Be a Christian Philosopher: A Roycean Odyssey Through the Mind of Frank M. Oppenheim, SJ.David W. Rodick - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):90.
    Fr. Frank Oppenheim’s body of work dedicated to the philosophy of Josiah Royce exhibits a degree of objectivity and admiration not evidenced in philosophical circles since Ralph Barton Perry’s magisterial The Thought and Character of William James.1 Royce once derisively referred to his own system Σ as akin to a Boston attic—a “junk heap” in which everything is there, but best of luck in getting anything out! It is helpful to consider the entire body of Oppenheim’s Royce-work as the combination (...)
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  8. Oppenheim's Legacy.Dwayne A. Tunstall - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (3):109.
    When thinking about Frank M. Oppenheim’s legacy, one cannot help but think, first and foremost, about his many contributions to Royce scholarship. Yet I personally have had some difficulty imagining how to characterize Oppenheim’s contributions to Royce scholarship until late 2013. Prior to that time, the more I thought about how to characterize his contributions to Royce scholarship, the less I became able to imagine an appropriate characterization of them. Then, on an autumn afternoon in 2013, I stumbled across a (...)
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  9.  3
    Living with Immigrants in a Context of Difference: Exclusion, Assimilation, or Pluralism.Daniel G. Campos - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):109.
    in their book American Philosophy: From Wounded Knee to the Present, contemporary philosophers Erin McKenna and Scott Pratt identify "living in a context of difference" as the central philosophical issue in the history of the United States. They credit W. E. B. Du Bois with having identified racial difference as one particular version of this general issue: "Du Bois once declared that the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line—the problem of the coexistence of differences (...)
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  10.  3
    Competence in Compensating for Incompetence: Odo Marquard on Philosophy.Benjamin De Mesel - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):50.
    "at a chinese executioners' competition, the story goes, the second of two finalists found himself in an uncomfortable predicament. His opponent had just completed an exquisitely precise and unmatchable beheading, which he now had to outdo. The suspense was overwhelming. With his keen-edged sword, the second executioner performed his stroke. However, the head of the victim failed to drop, and the delinquent, to all appearances untouched, gave the executioner a surprised and questioning look. To which the executioner's response was: 'Just (...)
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  11. American Philosophy: A Love Story by John Kaag.Robert W. King - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):123-125.
    In previous works such as Thinking Through the Imagination: Aesthetics in Human Cognition and Idealism, Pragmatism, and Feminism: The Philosophy of Ella Lyman Cabot, John Kaag firmly established his "street cred" as a scholar and interpreter of American philosophy. His name will also be familiar to readers of the Chronicle of Higher Education, The New York Times, and sundry other publications as he endeavors to impact a larger audience, off campus, to serve as a public intellectual, one we need now (...)
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  12.  1
    Agency, Systems, and “Civilization”: Dewey and the Anthropocene.Phillip McReynolds - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):72.
    The materialistic philosophy which sees 'man' as pitted against his environment is rapidly breaking down as technological man becomes more and more able to oppose the largest systems. Every battle that he wins brings a threat of disaster. The unit of survival—either in ethics or in evolution—is not the organism or the species but the largest system or 'power' within which the creature lives. If the creature destroys its environment, it destroys itself.Man needs the earth in order to walk, the (...)
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  13.  1
    The Search for Certainty: A Pragmatist Critique of Society's Focus on Biological Childbearing.Jamie Ross - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):96.
    biological theories of emotion are often used to explain and predict human desires, particularly the desire to reproduce. I propose that these desires are largely socially constructed, but that the naturalization of desires and the normalization of biological theories sustain the pursuit of biological childbearing as a biological need. Foundational metaphysical and epistemological theories have lent both authority and urgency to the idea of a biological need to bear children, which has resulted in a diminished focus on alternative modes of (...)
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  14.  12
    The Philosophy of Gesture: Completing Pragmatists' Incomplete Revolution by Giovanni Maddalena.Matteo Santarelli - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):119-122.
    The Philosophy of Gesture by Giovanni Maddalena is a multilayered volume: It is a "history of philosophy" book, endorsing a challenging anti-Kantian interpretation of Peirce and pragmatism. It is a "theoretical philosophy" book, dealing with classic issues—for example, the difference between synthetic and analytic, the definition of identity—and introducing a new concept, that of complete gesture. Finally, it is a book of "applied philosophy," pointing to a further application of the new concept of complete gesture to the fields of pedagogy, (...)
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  15.  5
    “The Americas Seek Not Enlightenment but Liberation”: On the Philosophical Significance of Liberation for Philosophy in the Americas.Grant Silva - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):1.
    This essay offers an account of the philosophical significance of liberation and prescribes the special place the idea of liberation ought to hold in the context of inter-American philosophical dialogue. Drawing from Latin American liberation philosophy, as well as philosophical and theoretical discourses and debates that can be considered part of a larger liberatory tradition, my goal is to explore the idea of liberation as a process, or perhaps more appropriately a praxis, harboring both critical and creative potentialities.
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  16.  1
    Orientalism and Enlightenment Positivism: A Critique of Anglophone Sinology, Comparative Literature, and Philosophy.Shuchen Xiang - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (2):22.
    On January 1, 1958, in the journal Democratic Critique, Zhang Junmai, Mou Zongsan, Tang Junyi, and Xu Fuguan published the "Manifesto on Chinese Culture for the World: Our Common Understanding of Chinese Scholarship Research and of the Future of Chinese Culture and World Culture."1 This manifesto is commonly seen as the founding statement of the New Confucianism movement. Section 2 of the manifesto, "Three Motives, Approaches, and their Shortcomings in the Study of Chinese Culture in World Scholarship," claimed that Chinese (...)
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  17.  3
    Wages for Academic Whiteness: Hispanics and Professionalization.Mariana Alessandri - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):59.
    in "whites: made in america: Advancing American Philosophers' Discourse on Race," the Reverend Thandeka claims that the terms "racism" and "white privilege" can't explain what motivated the majority of Donald Trump's voters, since most of them wouldn't identify as racist or privileged. Thandeka rejects Hillary Clinton's description of Trump supporters as "deplorable," a description that fits into a racial narrative that considers whiteness to be an issue of hatred toward blacks. Thandeka believes this narrative fails to account for the shame, (...)
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  18.  4
    Placental Ethics: Addressing Colonial Legacies and Imagining Culturally Safe Responses to Health Care in Hawai‘I.Celia T. Bardwell-Jones - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):97.
    feminist scholars studying gender in the Pacific have analyzed the conditions of Pacific Islander women with an acute analysis on how the intersections of gender, culture, colonization, and strategies of decolonization aid in framing the experiences of Pacific Islander women. Like many introduced Western institutions in Hawai'i, medical practices in hospitals and clinics have been both criticized and welcomed among Pacific Islanders. Feminist anthropologists Vicki Lukere and Margaret Jolly have diagnosed these conflicting receptions to medical institutions in the Pacific Islands (...)
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  19.  3
    Racial Experience as Bioculturally Embodied Difference and Political Possibilities for Resisting Racism.Gabriel A. Torres Colón - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):131.
    In 1903, W. E. B. Du Bois addressed the question "How does it feel to be a social problem?". In 2008, Moustafa Bayoumi answered the same question for Muslims in the United States. Both Du Bois and Bayoumi provide powerful critiques against any notion that racialized minorities are inherently problematic. Both men generally argue that one cannot blame racialized minorities for the ill treatment they endure under systematic oppression. Du Bois and Bayoumi are two of many voices fighting against the (...)
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  20.  3
    Can a Pragmatist Recite a Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note? Or Insurrectionist Challenges to Pragmatism—Walker, Child, and Locke.Leonard Harris - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):1.
    alain locke's version of pragmatism, critical pragmatism, provides a way to see how a philosophy contributes resources for the abused, subjugated, and humiliated facing existential crisis and impossible odds of relief. That is, it provides reasoning methods, terms, words, depictions, explanations, queries, dispositions, spirit, and conceptual categories as resources. I will argue that a viable philosophy should provide resources and reasoning methods that make the management of abjection and existential crisis viable, given impossible odds of relief; it should be encoded (...)
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  21.  3
    Playing the Race Game: A Response to Thandeka's “Whites: Made in America”.V. Denise James - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):51.
    It is rare that I both disagree so thoroughly with the first few lines of a talk or article and still find it compelling and timely. Reverend Dr. Thandeka's "Whites Made in America: Advancing American Philosophers' Discourse on Race" is one such paper. She begins, "'Racism" and 'white privilege' have outlived their usefulness as concepts and judgements. Neither term explains what's going on in America today".Like many, Thandeka marks the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States as (...)
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  22.  5
    Who Are Moral Philosophers? Ethics William James Style.Todd Lekan - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):81.
    many of william james's ethical writings celebrate appreciation and respect for diverse ways of life. For example, in the essay "On a Certain Blindness in Human Beings", James argues that it is a worthy endeavor to strive to overcome blindness to alien values in order to appreciate their rich diversity. In the essay "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life", he defends an inclusivity principle enjoining us to create a world that allows for the greatest diversity of ideals and demand (...)
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  23.  5
    What Is Going On? Where Do We Go From Here? Should the Souls of White Folks Be Saved?Gregory Fernando Pappas - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):67.
    in "whites: made in america," the Rev. Thandeka takes on the issues that have recently been in the minds of many Americans in light of racial problems and the shocking results of the elections: "What is going on?" She does not pretend to provide a full diagnosis, but argues that there is a need for a new conceptual shift and new target of our inquiries. Thandeka argues that underneath the veil of whiteness, there are troublesome feelings and emotions that need (...)
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  24.  7
    The Coalitional Imperative of Asian American Feminist Visibility.Shireen Roshanravan - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):115.
    while conducting a routine patrol, Peter Liang, a Chinese American New York City police officer, accidently fired his gun in the stairwell of the Louis Pink projects of Brooklyn, New York. The bullet ricocheted off the wall and struck Akai Gurley, a 28-year-old black father, who had entered the stairwell with his friend after giving up on the notoriously malfunctioning elevators. According to reports, the bullet "tore through [Akai's] body, fractured his third rib, nicked his sternum, and pierced his heart (...)
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  25.  10
    Whites: Made in America: Advancing American Philosophers' Discourse on Race. Thandeka - 2018 - The Pluralist 13 (1):26.
    "Racism" and "white privilege" have outlived their usefulness as concepts and judgments. Neither term explains what's going on in America today. Two factors now necessitate a conceptual shift.First, the unexpected election of Donald Trump as the forty-fifth President of the United States. Mainstream news reporters, political pundits, and social media commentators now have to discover and explore what they overlooked during their coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign: the needs, issues, interests, and narratives of white middle-class and working-class Americans.1Second, Hillary (...)
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