10 found

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  1. Haunting Guilt, Communities of Memory, and the Process of Atonement.Barnette Kara - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):60-73.
    When Dylann Roof massacred nine people at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, in June of 2015, he re-ignited a long-running debate over the appropriateness of having the flag of the American Confederacy fly over South Carolina’s state house. To many people of all races, it seems inconceivable why anyone would defend flying the Confederate flag over the state house. The flag obviously represents the Confederate States of America; it obviously highlights one of the most painful memories (...)
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  2. On the Road with Charles Johnson.Michael Boylan - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):38-49.
    this essay is a celebration of charles johnson. We have known each other for thirty-six years—ever since he sent me correspondence on my novel Georgia that I had submitted to the Fiction Collective. We have corresponded off and on over this time. The more I got to know Charles, the more I found similarities in our interests and worldviews. With that disclaimer out of the way, let’s move forward and first examine some of the theoretical claims and then show how (...)
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  3. Intra-American Philosophy in Practice: Indigenous Voice, Felt Knowledge, and Settler Denial.Cook Anna - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):74-84.
    In a global era of apology and reconciliation, Canadians, like their counterparts in other settler nations, face a moral and ethical dilemma that stems from an unsavoury colonial past. Canadians grew up believing that the history of their country is a story of the cooperative venture between people who came from elsewhere to make a better life and those who were already here, who welcomed and embraced them, aside from a few bad white men.on 11 June 2008, the Prime Minister (...)
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  4. Introduction, Charles R. Johnson, 2016 Coss Dialogues Invited Speaker.E. Hart Richard - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):15-18.
    There is more engagement with philosophy—Western and Eastern—in my work than you will find anywhere in the history of black American literature.1the coss dialogues, which began in 1995, resulted from a generous endowment provided to SAAP from the estates of Herbert W. Schneider and Albert G. Redpath, both students of John J. Coss at Columbia University. The dialogues are intended to promote conversation between philosophers in the “classic” American tradition and accomplished specialists in other fields. They seek to bridge the (...)
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  5. At the Crossroad of Philosophy and Literature.Charles R. Johnson - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):19-29.
    If literature isn’t everything, it’s not worth a single hour of some-one’s trouble.whenever we discuss literature, it is likely that at some point, we find the conversation turning to its sister discipline, philosophy. Both forms of expression offer interpretations of our experience delivered through the performance of language. Moreover, the relationship between philosophy and literature is reinforced by the obvious but seldom-stated fact that philosophers are not just thinkers; they are also writers. And our finest storytellers, the ones who transform (...)
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  6. Feminism and Historicist Universalism: A Critical Analysis of Richard Rorty's Anti-Universalism.Youjin Kong - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):50-59.
    Richard Rorty, a neo-pragmatist well known for his anti-universalist philosophy, applies his anti-universalist approach to feminism in the paper titled “Feminism and Pragmatism” (1991). In this paper, Rorty claims that universalism is not helpful for feminists in making changes to a masculinist society. In contrast, the main point of my paper is to defend universalism as appropriate to feminism. It is not, however, argued in the form of advocacy for all versions of universalism. I will classify universalism into two distinguished (...)
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    The Need for Reciprocity and Respect in Philosophy.Erin McKenna - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):1-14.
    it is a bit daunting to be standing here today. I attended my first Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy meeting in 1992 and immediately felt at home. However, I also wondered why there weren’t more women and more feminist papers. Little did I know that my dissertation director and mentor, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, was already in the process of starting a revolution. American philosophy generally, and pragmatism in particular, seemed to me perfectly suited for taking up issues of (...)
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  8. Forms of Transference: On Charles Johnson's Philosophical Fiction.Eduardo Mendieta - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):30-37.
    i want to begin by thanking my good friend Richard Hart for the invitation to be part of this wonderful panel in which we are honoring while also being challenged by the work of Charles Johnson to think differently about our discipline. I also want to thank the organizers of SAAP for hosting this important series of lectures, in which we are invited to engage the work of thinkers who challenge us to think differently because they either come to our (...)
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  9. Philosophical Letter Writing: A Look at Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz's "Reply" and Gloria Anzaldúa's "Speaking in Tongues".Margaret Newton - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):101-109.
    scholars often use letter correspondences to uncover missing historical information. For example, while searching for the influential but unacknowledged women in the history of pragmatism, Charlene Haddock Seigfried discovered John Dewey’s letters to Elsie Ripley Clapp. Using these letters, Seigfried defended Clapp’s name as an early pragmatist. Similarly, Joan Smith cited Dewey’s letter to John T. McManis to show that Ella Flagg Young likewise influenced Dewey’s work. More recently, Eduardo Mendieta has defended a different approach to letters, and argues that (...)
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  10. Zapatismo, Luis Villoro, and American Pragmatism on Democracy, Power, and Injustice.Gregory Fernando Pappas - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):85-100.
    pragmatism has been appropriated and welcomed in Latin America because there is much prior practice and circumstance that makes for a good fit, and not simply because it was an external solution to local problems. In fact, many developments have already occurred in Latin America that, although not directly influenced by John Dewey, are better examples of his methods and ideas than what occurs north of the Rio Grande.1 Indeed, when Dewey was in Mexico, he was impressed with their educational (...)
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