21 found

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  1. The Ethical Basis for Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Only After Informed Consent in Selected Patient Groups Admitted to Hospital.Philip Berry & Iona Heath - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):111-116.
    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently performed on patients who, in retrospect, had a very low chance of survival. This is because all patients are ‘For cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ on admission to hospital by default, and delays occur before cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be ‘de-prescribed’. This article reviews the nature of potential harms caused by futile cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the reasons why de-prescription may be delayed, recent legal judgements relevant to timely do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making, and the possible detrimental effects of do (...)
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  2.  6
    Beyond Individualism: Is There a Place for Relational Autonomy in Clinical Practice and Research?S. Dove Edward, E. Kelly Susan, Lucivero Federica, Machirori Mavis, Dheensa Sandi & Prainsack Barbara - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):150-165.
    The dominant, individualistic understanding of autonomy that features in clinical practice and research is underpinned by the idea that people are, in their ideal form, independent, self-interested and rational gain-maximising decision-makers. In recent decades, this paradigm has been challenged from various disciplinary and intellectual directions. Proponents of ‘relational autonomy’ in particular have argued that people’s identities, needs, interests – and indeed autonomy – are always also shaped by their relations to others. Yet, despite the pronounced and nuanced critique directed at (...)
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  3. Attitudes of Singapore Emergency Department Staff Towards Family Presence During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.Lederman Zohar, Baird Geraldine, Dong Chaoyan, S. H. Leong Benjamin & Y. Pal Rakhee - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):124-134.
    BackgroundFamily presence during adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation is still not widely implemented. Based on empirical evidence, various national and international professional organizations recommend allowing relatives to be present during resuscitation. However, healthcare providers worldwide are still reluctant to make it standard care.PurposeThis paper is a part of an ongoing cross-cultural study that aims to solicit attitudes of healthcare providers working in emergency departments towards family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This paper reports the qualitative data from surveying healthcare providers working in an (...)
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  4. Is Healthcare Providers’ Value-Neutrality Depending on How Controversial a Medical Intervention Is? Analysis of 10 More or Less Controversial Interventions.Lynöe Niels, Björk Joar & Juth Niklas - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):117-123.
    BackgroundSwedish healthcare providers are supposed to be value-neutral when making clinical decisions. Recent conducted studies among Swedish physicians have indicated that the proportion of those whose personal values influence decision-making vary depending on the framing and the nature of the issue.ObjectiveTo examine whether the proportions of value-influenced and value-neutral participants vary depending on the extent to which the intervention is considered controversial.MethodsTo discriminate between value-neutral and value-influenced healthcare providers, we have used the same methods in six vignette based studies including (...)
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  5.  1
    ‘It’s Like Sailing’ – Experiences of the Role as Facilitator During Moral Case Deliberation.Dara Rasoal, Annica Kihlgren & Mia Svantesson - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):135-142.
    BackgroundMoral case deliberation is one form of clinical ethics support, and there seems to be different ways of facilitating the dialogue.PurposeThis paper aimed to explore Swedish facilitators' experiences of their role in moral case deliberations.MethodThis study had a qualitative approach with explorative design. Semi-structured interviews with eleven MCD facilitators were conducted. Their experiences were analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultBeing a facilitator was understood through the metaphor of sailing: against the wind or with it. The role was likened to a sailor's set (...)
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  6.  2
    Overruling Parental Decisions in Paediatric Medicine: A Comparison of Diekema’s Harm Threshold Framework and the Zone of Parental Discretion Framework.Vicki Xafis - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):143-149.
    BackgroundThe complexity of decision-making in the paediatric context is well recognised. In the majority of cases, parents and healthcare professionals work together to decide which treatments the paediatric patient should receive. On occasions, however, parental wishes conflict with what clinicians think is best for the paediatric patient. Where persistent disagreement between clinicians and parents exists, clinicians must ascertain if they have a moral, professional, and legal obligation to overrule the parents' decision and implement their preferred option.PurposeFew decision-making frameworks to assist (...)
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  7.  3
    Children’s Consent and the Zone of Parental Discretion.P. Alderson - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):55-62.
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  8.  2
    The Assumptions of Ethical Rationing: An Unreasonable Man’s Response to Magelssen Et Al.Michael Loughlin - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):63-69.
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  9. Ulysses Contracts Regarding Compulsory Care for Patients with Borderline Personality Syndrome.Antoinette Lundahl, Gert Helgesson & Niklas Juth - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):82-85.
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  10. Knowledge and Attitudes of Medical and Nursing Practitioners Regarding Non-Beneficial Futile Care in the Intensive Care Units of Trinidad and Tobago.Sridhar Polakala, Seetharaman Hariharan & Deryk Chen - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):95-101.
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  11. Why UK Doctors Should Be Troubled by Female Genital Mutilation Legislation.Arianne Shahvisi - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):102-108.
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  12.  3
    Force-Feeding Political Prisoners on Hunger Strike.Michael Weingarten - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):86-94.
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  13.  1
    International Workshop: Health Care Provision for Migrants: Comparing Approaches to Ethical Challenges in Germany and the United Kingdom.Peter G. N. West-Oram & Nora Gottlieb - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):76-81.
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  14.  2
    The Bedside Rationing Paradigm and the Shortcomings of Modernist Ethics.Vegard Bruun Wyller - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):70-75.
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  15.  4
    Patient Participation in Clinical Ethics Support Services – Patient-Centered Care, Justice and Cultural Competence.J. Ballantyne Angela, Dai Elizabeth & Gray Ben - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):11-18.
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  16.  1
    Is Imperfection Becoming Easier to Live with for Doctors?Reidun Førde & Olaf G. Aasland - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):31-36.
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  17.  1
    Eating Yourself Away: Reflections on the ‘Comorbidity’ of Eating Disorders and Gender Dysphoria.Simona Giordano - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):45-53.
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  18.  5
    Not Knowing the “Right Thing to Do:” Moral Distress and Tolerating Uncertainty in Medicine.Christinia Landry - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):37-44.
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  19. The Development of Clinical Ethics in Italy and the Birth of the “Document of Trento”.Mario Picozzi, Federico Nicoli & Renzo Pegoraro - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):24-30.
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  20.  1
    Abortion for Life-Limiting Foetal Anomaly: Beneficial When and for Whom?Helen Watt - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):1 - 10.
    Abortion for life-limiting foetal anomaly is often an intensely painful choice for the parents; though widely offered and supported, it is surprisingly difficult to defend in ethical terms. Abortion on this ground is sometimes defended as foetal euthanasia but has features which sharply differentiate it from standard non-voluntary euthanasia, not least the fact that any suffering otherwise anticipated for the child may be neither severe nor prolonged. Such abortions may be said to reduce suffering for the family including siblings – (...)
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  21. What Are the Focal Points in Bioethics Literature? Examining the Discussions About Everyday Ethics in Parkinson’s Disease.Natalie Zizzo, Emily Bell & Eric Racine - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (1):19-23.
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