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  1.  1
    Remuneration in the United States and Mexico: Assessing the Level of Influence on Potential Clinical Research Participants About Their Decision to Participate in a Clinical Trial and the Risk of Fraud.Jose Flores-Figueroa, Ingrid Badillo, Gilberto Botello, Ursus Pacheco, Mercedes Paredes-Paredes & Suzan McGovern - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (2):98-105.
    Monetary compensation given to study subjects in a clinical trial is an effective tool to increase overall study enrolment, nonetheless it may stimulate some participants to commit fraud and lie about their medical history.A survey-study in 684 Hispanic prospective subjects in Mexico and USA was conducted to evaluate if a high monetary compensation would encourage them to lie about their medical history. Almost half of the subjects considered participating in a clinical trial with no compensation. Younger male individuals were more (...)
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  2.  2
    Conscientious Objection: A Morally Insupportable Misuse of Authority.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (2):82-87.
    In this paper, I argue that the conscience clause around abortion provision in England, Scotland and Wales is inadequate for two reasons. First, the patient and doctor are differently situated with respect to social power. Doctors occupy a position of significant moral and epistemic authority with respect to their patients, who are vulnerable and relatively disempowered. Doctors are rightly required to disclose their conscientious objection, but given the positioning of the patient and doctor, the act of doing so exploits the (...)
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  3.  2
    Allowing Harm Because We Care: Self-Injury and Harm Minimisation.Patrick J. Sullivan - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (2):88-97.
    Harm minimisation has been proposed as a means of supporting people who self-injure. When adopting this approach, rather than trying to stop self-injury immediately the person is allowed to injure safely whilst developing more appropriate ways of dealing with distress. The approach is controversial as the health care professional actively allows harm to occur. This paper will consider a specific objection to harm minimisation. That is, it is a misguided collaboration between the health care professional and the person who self-injures (...)
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  4.  6
    Love as a Core Value in Veterinary and Medical Practice: Towards a Humanimal Clinical Ethics?Ann Gallagher, Fraje Watson & Noel Fitzpatrick - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):1-8.
    This article represents the outcome of a dialogue between a vet and a healthcare ethicist on the theme of ‘love’ in professional life. We focus on four types or varieties of love in relation to the professional care of humans and animals. We discuss the relevance of Fromm’s core elements of love and consider the implications of these for human and animal health care practice. We present and respond to five arguments that might be waged against embracing love as a (...)
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  5.  5
    Life-Sustaining Treatments in End-Stage Chronic Respiratory Failure: A Single-Centre Study.Jose Filipe da Purificacao Monteiro - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):26-33.
    PurposeThe acute-on-chronic exacerbations of end-stage respiratory diseases often result in prolonged hospital stays, relating these events to ethical conflicts in the fields of medical futility and distributive justice. This study aimed to understand patients’ preferences for life-sustaining treatments when clinically stable and during regular follow-up visits, and to determine the factors that can influence these preferences.ProcedureThis was a prospective, observational, exploratory study using convenience sampling. Over a three-year period, the study enrolled 106 adult outpatients with end-stage pulmonary disease on long-term (...)
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  6.  7
    Testing Conscientious Objection by the Norm of Medicine.Toni C. Saad & Gregory Jackson - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):9-16.
    Debate persists over the place of conscience in medicine. Some argue for the complete exclusion of conscientious objection, while others claim an absolute right of refusal. This paper proposes that claims of conscientious objection can and should be permitted if they concern kinds of actions which fall outside of the normative standard of medicine, which is the pursuit of health. Medical practice which meets this criterion we call medicine qua medicine. If conscientious refusal concerns something consonant with the health-restoring aims (...)
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