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  1. Just Freedom: A Moral Compass for a Complex World. [REVIEW]James Bohman - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):402-404.
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  2.  1
    Drones, Risk, and Perpetual Force.Christian Enemark - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):365-381.
    This article contributes to the debate among just war theorists about the ethics of using armed drones in the war on terror. If violence of this kind is to be effectively restrained, it is necessary first to establish an understanding of its nature. Because it is difficult to conceptualize drone-based violence as war, there is concern that such violence is thus not captured by the traditional jus ad bellum framework. Drone strikes probably do not constitute a law enforcement practice, so (...)
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  3. A Call For A Global Constitutional Convention Focused On Future Generations.Stephen Gardiner - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):299-315.
    The Carnegie Council's work “is rooted in the premise that the incorporation of ethical concerns into discussions of international affairs will yield more effective policies both in the United States and abroad.” In honor of the Council's centenary, we have been asked to present our views on the ethical and policy issues posed by climate change, focusing on what people need to know that they probably do not already know, and what should be done. In that spirit, this essay argues (...)
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  4. Moral Collapse in a Warming World.Hamilton Clive - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):335-342.
    In his definitive book A Perfect Moral Storm, ethicist Stephen Gardiner argues that the way forward in a climate-changed world is so difficult in part because we “do not yet have a good understanding of many of the ethical issues at stake in global-warming policy.” We remain confused about such vital questions as who should take responsibility for the current condition, how to preserve equity between generations, and how best to think about our responsibility toward nonhuman animals. The resistance of (...)
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  5. The Vulnerable in International Society. [REVIEW]Kalevi Holsti - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):399-402.
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  6. Western Pessimism, Asian Optimism: Three Perspectives on Global Governance.Jolly Sir Richard - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):383-396.
    Governing the World: The History of an Idea, Mark Mazower, 496 pp., $29.95 cloth, $18 paper.Divided Nations: Why Global Governance Is Failing and What We Can Do About It, Ian Goldin, 200 pp., $21.95 cloth, $15 paper.The Great Convergence: Asia, the West, and the Logic of One World, Kishore Mahbubani, 328 pp., $26.99 cloth, $16.99 paper.As of 2007 the world economy has been caught in the worst crisis since the 1930s. Yet after two years of only partly successful efforts to (...)
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  7. A “Natural” Proposal For Addressing Climate Change.Lovejoy Thomas - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):359-363.
    One of the fundamental challenges of climate change is that we contribute to it increment by increment, and experience it increment by increment after a considerable time lag. As a consequence, it is very difficult to see what we are doing to ourselves, to future generations, and to the living planet as a whole. There are monumental ethical issues involved, but they are obscured by the incremental nature of the process and the long time frame before reaching the concentration of (...)
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  8. The Changing Ethics of Climate Change.Mittler Daniel - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):351-358.
    Many in the environmental movement have argued in recent years that in order to speed up climate actions we should take the ethics out of the climate change debate. Focusing on the moral obligation to act or on the effects of climate change on the most vulnerable was often judged to render the discourse too “heavy,” “negative,” or “difficult.” Many also deemed it unnecessary. After all, renewable energies, better designed cities that allow for reduced car use, and power plant regulations (...)
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  9. Who Are Atrocity's “Real” Perpetrators, Who Its “True” Victims and Beneficiaries?Mark Osiel - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):281-297.
    Modern law's response to mass atrocities vacillates equivocally in how it understands the dramatis personae to these expansive tragedies, at once extraordinary and ubiquitous. Is there any principled order to this? If not, should we care?
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  10.  1
    Three Questions on Climate Change.Palmer Clare - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):343-350.
    Climate change will have highly significant and largely negative effects on human societies into the foreseeable future, effects that are already generating ethical and policy dilemmas of unprecedented scope, scale, and complexity. One important group of ethical and policy issues raised here concerns what I call environmental values. By this I do not mean the impact that climate change will have on the environment as a valuable human resource, nor am I referring to the changing climate as a threat to (...)
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  11. The Dawning of an Earth Ethic.Scott Sanders - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):317-324.
    Among Earth's millions of species, ours is the only one capable of rapidly changing the chemistry of the atmosphere and thereby endangering the whole web of life, from phytoplankton and corals to polar bears and pine trees, from hummingbirds to humans. We are also the only species capable of documenting this disruption, identifying its causes, and acting to counter it. Yet so far we have failed to act on the scale or with the urgency required to avert this unfolding disaster. (...)
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  12. The Confidence Trap: A History of Democracy in Crisis From World War I to the Present. [REVIEW]Throntveit Trygve - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):397-399.
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  13. Ethical Enhancement in an Age of Climate Change.Paul Wapner - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (3):325-334.
    This roundtable of Ethics & International Affairs provides an opportunity to step back and reflect on the fundamental elements of climate change and how ethics can play a role in addressing them. In this spirit, I explore three questions that capture the broad outlines of climate concerns. First, what is the nature of climate change as a global problem? Second, what frustrates humanity's ability to respond? Third, what can be done?
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  14. Against a World Court for Human Rights.Philip Alston - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):197-212.
    Too much of the debate about how respect for human rights can be advanced on a global basis currently revolves around crisis situations involving so-called mass atrocity crimes and the possibility of addressing abuse through the use of military force. This preoccupation, as understandable as it is, serves to mask much harder questions of how to deal with what might be termed silent and continuous atrocities, such as gross forms of gender or ethnic discrimination or systemic police violence, in ways (...)
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  15. Global Justice and Avant-Garde Political Agency. [REVIEW]Bailey Tom - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):266-268.
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  16.  7
    From Empire to Sovereignty—and Back?Jens Bartelson - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):251-262.
    Foundations of Modern International Thought, David Armitage , 300 pp., $85 cloth, $27.99 paper.A Search for Sovereignty: Law and Geography in European Empires 1400–1900, Lauren Benton , 340 pp., $94 cloth, $28.99 paper.Globalization and Sovereignty: Rethinking Legality, Legitimacy, and Constitutionalism, Jean L. Cohen , 442 pp., $103 cloth, $37.99 paper.Sovereignty apparently never ceases to attract scholarly attention. Long gone are the days when its meaning was uncontested and its essential attributes could be safely taken for granted by international theorists. During (...)
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  17.  16
    Drones and the Question of “The Human”.Roger Berkowitz - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):159-169.
    Domino's Pizza is testing “Domicopter” drones to deliver pizzas, which will compete with Taco Bell's “Tacocopter” drones. Not to be outdone, Amazon is working on an army of delivery drones that will cut out the postal service. In Denmark, farmers use drones to inspect fields for the appearance of harmful weeds, which reduces herbicide use as the drones directly apply pesticides only where it is needed. Environmentalists send drones into glacial caves or into deep waters, gathering data that would be (...)
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  18. Fairness in Practice: A Social Contract for a Global Economy. [REVIEW]Simon Cotton - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):268-271.
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  19.  18
    State Sovereignty and International Human Rights.Jack Donnelly - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):225-238.
    I am skeptical of our ability to predict, or even forecast, the future—of human rights or any other important social practice. Nonetheless, an understanding of the paths that have brought us to where we are today can facilitate thinking about the future. Thus, I approach the topic by examining the reshaping of international ideas and practices of state sovereignty and human rights since the end of World War II. I argue that in the initial decades after the war, international society (...)
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  20.  8
    The Future of Human Rights: A View From the United Nations.Andrew Gilmour - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):239-250.
    Ever since the Charter of the United Nations was signed in 1945, human rights have constituted one of its three pillars, along with peace and development. As noted in a dictum coined during the World Summit of 2005: “There can be no peace without development, no development without peace, and neither without respect for human rights.” But while progress has been made in all three domains, it is with respect to human rights that the organization's performance has experienced some of (...)
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  21. Climate Matters: Ethics in a Warming World. [REVIEW]Dale Jamieson - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):263-265.
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  22.  7
    What Future for Human Rights?James Nickel - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):213-223.
    Like people born shortly after World War II, the international human rights movement recently had its sixty-fifth birthday. This could mean that retirement is at hand and that death will come in a few decades. After all, the formulations of human rights that activists, lawyers, and politicians use today mostly derive from the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the world in 1948 was very different from our world today: the cold war was about to break out, communism was (...)
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  23.  5
    The Future of the Human Rights Movement.Beth Simmons - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):183-196.
    The modern human rights movement is at a critical juncture in its history. It has been nearly seventy years since the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and some of the oldest and most active human rights organizations have been operating around the world for about forty years. More than twenty years have passed since the end of the cold war, and the time when people spoke in triumphal terms of the global success of Western values is now (...)
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  24.  4
    Why Human Rights Are Called Human Rights.Alan Sussman - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (2):171-182.
    The title of this essay is rather ambitious and the space available is hardly sufficient to examine two words of almost limitless expanse—“human rights”—whether standing alone or in tandem. This requires that I begin with what a teacher of mine, Leo Strauss, called “low facts.” My low facts are these: We call ourselves humans because we have certain characteristics that define our nature. We are social and political animals, as Aristotle noted, and possess attributes not shared by other animals. The (...)
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  25. Drones and the International Rule of Law.Rosa Brooks - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):83-103.
    The international rule of law hinges on the existence of a shared lexicon accepted by states and other actors in the international system. With no independent judicial system capable of determining the meaning of words and concepts, states must develop shared interpretations of the law and the concepts and terms it relies on, and be willing to abide by those shared interpretations. When such shared interpretations exist, key aspects of the rule of law can be present even in the absence (...)
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  26. Modern Pluralism: Anglo-American Debates Since 1880. [REVIEW]George Crowder - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):151-153.
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  27.  2
    Hobbes on the International Rule of Law.David Dyzenhaus - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):53-64.
    Perhaps the most influential passage on the rule of law in international law comes from chapter 13 of Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan. In the course of describing the miserable condition of mankind in the state of nature, Hobbes remarks to readers who might be skeptical that such a state ever existed that they need only look to international relations—the relations between independent states—to observe one: But though there had never been any time, wherein particular men were in a condition of warre (...)
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  28. Coalitions of the Willing and Responsibilities to Protect: Informal Associations, Enhanced Capacities, and Shared Moral Burdens.Toni Erskine - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):115-145.
    “Coalition of the willing” is a phrase that we hear invoked with frequency in world politics. Significantly, it is generally accompanied by claims to moral responsibility. Yet the label commonly used to connote a temporary, purpose-driven, self-selected collection of states sits uneasily alongside these assertions of moral responsibility.This article explores how the informal nature of such associations should inform judgments of moral responsibility. I begin by briefly recounting what I call a model of institutional moral agency in order to explain (...)
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  29. The International Rule of Law: Law and the Limit of Politics.Ian Hurd - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):39-51.
    The international rule of law is often seen as a centerpiece of the modern international order. It is routinely reaffirmed by governments, international organizations, scholars, and activists, who credit it with reducing the recourse to war, preserving human rights, and constraining the pursuit of state self-interests. It is commonly seen as supplanting coercion and power politics with a framework of mutual interests that is cemented by state consent.
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  30.  1
    Nsa Management Directive #424: Secrecy and Privacy in the Aftermath of Edward Snowden.George Lucas Jr - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):29-38.
    Whatever else one might say concerning the legality, morality, and prudence of his actions, Edward Snowden, the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor, is right about the notion of publicity and informed consent, which together constitute the hallmark of democratic public policy. In order to be morally justifiable, any strategy or policy involving the body politic must be one to which it would voluntarily assent when fully informed about it. This, in essence, was Snowden's argument for leaking, in June 2013, (...)
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  31. International Law and the Mediation of Culture.Christian Reus-Smit - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):65-82.
    When international relations scholars think about international law they either ignore culture or offer highly deterministic accounts of its role. For the majority of scholars, international law is a rational construction, an institutional solution to the problem of order in an anarchical system, a body of rules and practices that reflect the contending interests and capabilities of major states. Issues of culture barely rate a mention. For others, culture is the deep foundation of international law, the structuring “mentality” that gives (...)
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  32.  1
    Political Self-Sacrifice: Agency, Body and Emotion in International Relations. [REVIEW]Andrew Ross - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):149-151.
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  33. The Contemporary Relevance of Buddha.Sen Amartya - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):15-27.
    The great poet and novelist Rabindranath Tagore once remarked that he was extremely sad that he was not alive when Gautama Buddha was still around. Tagore very much wished he could have had conversations with Buddha. I share that sentiment, but, like Rabindranath, I am also immensely grateful that, even now, we can enjoy—and learn from—the ideas and arguments that Buddha gave us twenty-five hundred years ago. Our world may be very different from what Buddha faced in the sixth century (...)
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  34. Kosovo to Kadi: Legality and Legitimacy in the Contemporary International Order.Ruti Teitel - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):105-113.
    Whence does international law derive its normative force as law in a world that remains, in many respects, one where legitimate politics is practiced primarily at the national level? As with domestically focused legal theories, one standard answer is positivistic: the law's authority is based on its origin in agreed procedures of consent. This is certainly plausible with respect to treaty obligations and commitments that derive from the United Nations Charter, but it leaves customary international law vulnerable to legitimacy critiques—of (...)
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  35. The Politics and Ethics of Identity: In Search of Ourselves. [REVIEW]Alan Wolfe - 2014 - Ethics & International Affairs 28 (1):147-149.
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