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  1.  4
    Reframing the Debate Around State Responses to Infertility: Considering the Harms of Subfertility and Involuntary Childlessness.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki A. Entwistle & Siladitya Bhattacharya - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):290-300.
    Many countries are experiencing increasing levels of demand for access to assisted reproductive technologies. Policies regarding who can access ART and with what support from a collective purse are highly contested, raising questions about what state responses are justified. Whilst much of this debate has focused on the status of infertility as a disease, we argue that this is something of a distraction, since disease framing does not provide the far-reaching, robust justification for state support that proponents of ART seem (...)
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  2.  6
    Biobanking and the Abandonment of Informed Consent: An Ethical Imperative.Stephanie Solomon Cargill - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):255-263.
    There has been extensive discussion in research ethics literature surrounding the appropriate form of informed consent for biobanking, whether with adapted content, or adapted forms such as broad or tiered consent. These discussions presuppose that it is possible to disclose adequate information at the outset to facilitate an informed choice to donate to a biobank. I will argue that informed consent cannot be achieved because in the biobanking context, we are either consenting to an enterprise that is not research or (...)
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  3.  2
    Culling and the Common Good: Re-Evaluating Harms and Benefits Under the One Health Paradigm.Chris Degeling, Zohar Lederman & Melanie Rock - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):244-254.
    One Health is a novel paradigm that recognizes that human and non-human animal health is interlinked through our shared environment. Increasingly prominent in public health responses to zoonoses, OH differs from traditional approaches to animal-borne infectious risks, because it also aims to promote the health of animals and ecological systems. Despite the widespread adoption of OH, culling remains a key component of institutional responses to the risks of zoonoses. Using the threats posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses to human (...)
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  4.  7
    How Do ‘Public’ Values Influence Individual Health Behaviour? An Empirical-Normative Analysis of Young Men’s Discourse Regarding HIV Testing Practices.Rod Knight, Will Small & Jean Shoveller - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):264-275.
    Philosophical arguments stemming from the public health ethics arena suggest that public health interventions ought to be subject to normative inquiry that considers relational values, including concepts such as solidarity, reciprocity and health equity. As yet, however, the extent to which ‘public’ values influence the ‘autonomous’ decisions of the public remains largely unexplored. Drawing on interviews with 50 men in Vancouver, Canada, this study employs a critical discourse analysis to examine participants’ decisions and motivations to voluntarily access HIV testing and/or (...)
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  5. How Do ‘Public’ Values Influence Individual Health Behaviour? An Empirical-Normative Analysis of Young Men’s Discourse Regarding HIV Testing Practices: Table 1.Rod Knight, Will Small & Jean Shoveller - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):264-275.
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  6.  3
    The Role of Socially Embedded Concepts in Breast Cancer Screening: An Empirical Study with Australian Experts.Lisa M. Parker & Stacy M. Carter - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):276-289.
    It is not clear whether breast cancer screening is a public health intervention or an individual clinical service. The question is important because the concepts best suited for ethical reasoning in public health might be different to the concepts commonly employed in biomedical ethics. We consider it likely that breast screening has elements of a public health intervention and used an empirical ethics approach to explore this further. If breast screening has public health characteristics, it is probable that policy and (...)
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  7.  6
    Ethical Evaluation of a Proposed Statutory Regulation of Food Advertising Targeted at Minors in Spain.Pino Almudena del & Royo-Bordonada Miguel Ángel - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):312-327.
    Food advertising targeted at children is associated with the development of unhealthy eating habits and childhood obesity. In Spain, where one in every three children suffers from overweight, a voluntary regulation mechanism has been adopted to control such advertising, despite evidence of its ineffectiveness. This study's stated objective was to evaluate the grounds for implementing a policy that would ban the advertising of energy-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages targeted at children in Spain, incorporating an ethical perspective in the analysis. Using (...)
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  8.  9
    Answering the Empirical Challenge to Arguments for Universal Health Coverage Based in Health Equity.Lynette Reid - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):231-243.
    Temkin asks how we should distribute resources between the social determinants of health and health care; Sreenivasan argues that if our goal is fair opportunity, funding universal health coverage is the wrong policy. He argues that social equality in health has not improved under UHC and concludes that fair opportunity would be better served by using the resources to address the SDOH instead. His criticism applies more broadly than he claims: it applies to any argument for UHC based on health (...)
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  9.  3
    Reasons to Participate or Not to Participate in Cardiovascular Health Checks: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW]Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):301-311.
    Cardiovascular health checks test risk factors for cardiovascular disease. They are offered to improve health: in case of an increased risk, participants receive lifestyle advice and medication. With this review, we investigate what is known about the reasons why people do or do not test for CVD risk factors. To what extent do these reasons relate to health monitoring and/or improvement? And do reasons differ in different contexts in which health checks are offered? We conducted a literature search and included (...)
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  10. Reasons to Participate or Not to Participate in Cardiovascular Health Checks: A Review of the Literature: Table 1. [REVIEW]Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):301-311.
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  11.  6
    Analysis of the Paternalistic Justification of an Agenda Setting Public Health Policy: The Case of Tobacco Plain Packaging.Thomas Boysen Anker - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):208-228.
    This article analyses the paternalistic justification of the world’s first mandatory tobacco plain packaging policy, which came into force in Australia in 2012. The policy is setting international precedence, with a range of developed and developing countries planning and implementing similar policies. Understanding the paternalistic dimension of the policy is therefore of imminent international importance. The policy meets important ethical benchmarks such as respect for citizens’ self-interests and protection of others against harm. However, plain packaging faces a number of ethical (...)
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  12.  1
    Introduction: Towards a Republic of Health?Jurgen De Wispelaere & John Coggon - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):123-124.
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  13.  5
    Right Relation and Right Recognition in Public Health Ethics: Thinking Through the Republic of Health.Bruce Jennings - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):168-177.
    The further development of public health ethics will be assisted by a more direct engagement with political theory. In this way, the moral vocabulary of the liberal tradition should be supplemented—but not supplanted—by different conceptual and normative resources available from other traditions of political and social thought. This article discusses four lines of further development that the normative conceptual discourse of public health ethics might take. The relational turn. The implications for public health ethics of the new ‘ecological’ or ‘relational’ (...)
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  14.  6
    The Moral Physiology of Inequality: Response to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-Domination Vs Non-Interference’.Stephen John - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):164-165.
    In this article, I respond to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities’. I first note a niggle about the paper’s assumption that lowering socio-economic inequalities will lower the social gradient in health. I then suggest two further ways in which neorepublicanism may relate to social epidemiology: in terms of ‘moral physiology’ and through analysing which inequalities are unjust.
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  15.  8
    Political Theory, Values and Public Health.Stephen R. Latham - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):139-149.
    This article offers some general criticisms of the idea that any political theory can legitimate public health interventions, and then some particular criticisms of Civic Republicanism as a political theory for public health. Civic Republicanism, I argue, legitimizes liberty-infringing public health interventions by demanding high levels of civic engagement in framing and reviewing them; to demand such engagement in pursuit of such a baseline value as health will leave insufficient civic energy for the pursuit of higher values.
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  16.  1
    Letter to the Editor: New Study Raises Questions About Effectiveness of Nicotine Replacement Therapy.Ross MacKenzie & Wendy Rogers - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):229-230.
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  17.  2
    Commentary on Nielsen and Landes, ‘Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-Domination and Non-Interference’.Cillian McBride - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):166-167.
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  18.  5
    Republicanism and the Paradox of Public Health Preconditions Comments on Steve Latham.Leticia Morales - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):150-152.
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  19.  6
    Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-Domination Vs Non-Interference.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Xavier Landes - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):155-163.
    Status inequalities seem to play a fairly big role in creating inequalities in health. This article assumes that there can be good reasons to fight status inequalities in order to reduce inequalities in health. It examines whether the neorepublican ideal of non-dominance does a better job as a theoretical foil for this as compared to a liberal notion of non-interference. The article concludes that there is a prima facie case for incorporating non-dominance into our thinking about public health, but that (...)
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  20.  8
    Right, Well-Being and the Republic of Health: A Response to Jennings.David Owen - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):178-179.
    This commentary offers a response to Bruce Jennings’ arguments concerning republicanism and health.
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  21.  2
    Democracy, Law and Relationships of Domination—A Response to ‘Can Republicanism Tame Public Health?’.Paul Scott - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):134-135.
    This brief comment responds to some of the issues raised by Daniel Weinstock’s paper on the application of the republican ideal to public health. It considers the application outside of that specific context of both the problem Weinstock identifies and the solution he proposes. It queries, with reference to the different sorts of relationships of domination which exist, whether a republican approach to public health might not be better to seek to begin from private relationships of domination and to define (...)
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  22.  3
    Comment on Jennings, ‘Right Relation and Right Recognition in Public Health Ethics: Thinking Through the Republic of Health’.Keith Syrett - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):180-182.
    This paper offers a brief comment on Jennings’ preceding paper, focusing on the capacity of a republican approach to public health ethics to facilitate reconceptualization of the right to health in situations of limited resources through a relational reading.
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  23.  8
    Towards a ‘Sociorelational’ Approach to Conceptualizing and Managing Addiction.Yvette van der Eijk & Susanne Uusitalo - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):198-207.
    This article looks at how and why addiction should be understood as a ‘sociorelational’ disorder, and what this implies on a policy level in terms of the treatment and prevention of addiction. In light of scientific research, we argue that the neurobiological changes that underlie addiction are heavily influenced by sociorelational processes. We thereby advocate for a conceptual approach in which autonomy in addiction is a sociorelational concept, and social environments are considered autonomy undermining or autonomy promoting. We then discuss (...)
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  24.  3
    Public Health and Political Theory: The Importance of Taming Individualism.A. M. Viens - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):136-138.
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  25.  3
    Can Republicanism Tame Public Health?Daniel Weinstock - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):125-133.
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  26.  3
    Lifestyle Vaccines and Public Health: Exploring Policy Options for a Vaccine to Stop Smoking.Anna Wolters, Guido de Wert, Onno C. P. Van Schayck & Klasien Horstman - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):183-197.
    Experimental vaccines are being developed for the treatment of ‘unhealthy lifestyles’ and associated chronic illnesses. Policymakers and other stakeholders will have to deal with the ethical issues that this innovation path raises: are there morally justified reasons to integrate these innovative biotechnologies in future health policies? Should public money be invested in further research? Focusing on the case of an experimental nicotine vaccine, this article explores the ethical aspects of ‘lifestyle vaccines’ for public health. Based on findings from a qualitative (...)
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  27.  1
    Public Health Interventions as Regulatory Governance: The Place of Political Theory.Karen Yeung - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):153-154.
    This is a reply to Steve Latham's Article for the Republicanism special issue.
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  28.  11
    Fresh Starts for Poor Health Choices: Should We Provide Them and Who Should Pay?Andreas Albertsen - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):55-64.
    Should we grant a fresh start to those who come to regret their past lifestyle choices? A negative response to this question can be located in the luck egalitarian literature. As a responsibility-sensitive theory of justice, luck egalitarianism considers it just that people’s relative positions reflect their past choices, including those they regret. In a recent article, Vansteenkiste, Devooght and Schokkaert argue against the luck egalitarian view, maintaining instead that those who regret their past choices in health are disadvantaged in (...)
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  29.  2
    Ethical Criteria for Human Challenge Studies in Infectious Diseases.Ben Bambery, Michael Selgelid, Charles Weijer, Julian Savulescu & Andrew J. Pollard - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):92-103.
    Purposeful infection of healthy volunteers with a microbial pathogen seems at odds with acceptable ethical standards, but is an important contemporary research avenue used to study infectious diseases and their treatments. Generally termed ‘controlled human infection studies’, this research is particularly useful for fast tracking the development of candidate vaccines and may provide unique insight into disease pathogenesis otherwise unavailable. However, scarce bioethical literature is currently available to assist researchers and research ethics committees in negotiating the distinct issues raised by (...)
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  30. Ethical Criteria for Human Challenge Studies in Infectious Diseases: Table 1.Ben Bambery, Michael Selgelid, Charles Weijer, Julian Savulescu & Andrew J. Pollard - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):92-103.
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  31.  4
    It’s a Shame! Stigma Against Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Examining the Ethical Implications for Public Health Practices and Policies.Bell Emily, Andrew Gail, Di Pietro Nina, E. Chudley Albert, N. Reynolds James & Racine Eric - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):65-77.
    Stigma can influence the prevention and identification of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, a leading cause of developmental delay in North America. Understanding the effects of public health practices and policies on stigma is imperative. We reviewed social science and biomedical literatures to understand the nature of stigma in FASD and its relevance from an ethics standpoint in matters of health practices and policies. We propose a descriptive model of stigma in FASD and note current knowledge gaps; discuss the ethical implications (...)
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  32.  2
    An Ethical Justification for Expanding the Notion of Effectiveness in Vaccine Post-Market Monitoring: Insights From the HPV Vaccine in Canada.Ana Komparic, Maxwell J. Smith & Alison Thompson - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):78-91.
    Health regulators must carefully monitor the real-world safety and effectiveness of marketed vaccines through post-market monitoring in order to protect the public’s health and promote those vaccines that best achieve public health goals. Yet, despite the fact that vaccines used in collective immunization programmes should be assessed in the context of a public health response, post-market effectiveness monitoring is often limited to assessing immunogenicity or limited programmatic features, rather than assessing effectiveness across populations. We argue that post-market monitoring ought to (...)
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  33.  4
    One Health and Culling as a Public Health Measure.Zohar Lederman - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):5-23.
    One of most pertinent and acute risks that the world is now facing is emerging or re-emerging zoonotic diseases. This article focuses on culling as a measure for zoonotic disease control, specifically the culling of 11,000 badgers as part of the Randomized Badger Culling Trial in the UK and the culling exercises in Singapore. The independent expert panel that devised the UK study concluded that reactive culling was ineffective in reducing the cases of bovine tuberculosis in cattle. The panel also (...)
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  34.  2
    Reply to Ackermann.Ross MacKenzie & Wendy Rogers - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):121-122.
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  35.  2
    Referral of Research Participants for Ancillary Care in Community-Based Public Health Intervention Research: A Guiding Framework.Maria W. Merritt, Joanne Katz, Ramin Mojtabai & Keith P. West - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):104-120.
    Researchers conducting large community-based studies among underserved populations may collect data on health conditions that are little-acknowledged in the local setting, and for which there are few if any services for referral of participants who need follow-up diagnosis and care. In the design and planning of studies for such settings, investigators and research ethics committees may struggle to determine what constitutes effective referral and whether it is reasonably available. We offer a guiding framework for referral planning, informed by our experiences (...)
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  36.  4
    Does Population Health Have an Intrinsically Distributional Dimension?Lynette Reid - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):24-36.
    Verweij and Dawson claim that population health has a distributive dimension; Coggon argues that this presupposes a normative commitment to equity in the very definition of population health, which should, rather, be neutral. I describe possible sources of the distributive view, several of which do not presuppose egalitarian commitments. Two relate to the nature of health as a property of individuals ; two relate to the epistemology and pragmatics of public and population health. A fifth source of the distributive view (...)
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  37.  6
    Structures of Virtue as a Framework for Public Health Ethics.Michael D. Rozier - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):37-45.
    Virtue ethics has a rich history; yet, its application in health ethics has been minimal compared to other major ethical frameworks. Even more, its application to health policy and population-level questions has been almost nonexistent. A new concept in moral theology, structures of virtue, provides impetus for ethicists to consider how virtue ethics can be a valuable addition to existing frameworks in public health ethics. This article offers a basic overview of virtue ethics and its value for analysis of social (...)
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  38.  4
    Ethical Promises and Pitfalls of OneHealth.Marcel Verweij & Bernice Bovenkerk - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):1-4.
    Emerging infectious diseases such as Ebola, Hendra, SARS, West Nile, Hepatitis E and avian influenza have led to a renewed recognition of how diseases in human beings, wildlife and livestock are interlinked. The changing prevalence and spread of such infections are largely determined by human activities and changes in environment and climate—where the latter are often also caused by human activities. Since the beginning of the 21st century, these insights have been brought together under the heading of OneHealth—a concept that (...)
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  39.  5
    Paternalism and Populations.Tom Walker - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):46-54.
    It is relatively uncontroversial that some public health policies are paternalistic. Furthermore, that they are paternalistic is often taken to show that they are morally wrong. In this article I challenge this position. The article starts by arguing that given standard definitions of paternalism it is unclear why such policies count as paternalistic. Whilst it might appear that they impose restrictions on what individuals can, or cannot, do for their own good, this is not the case. The reason for this (...)
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