Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics

ISSNs: 0963-1801, 1469-2147

35 found

View year:

  1.  4
    Germline Gene Editing: The Gender Issues.Iñigo de Miguel Beriain, Ekain Payán Ellacuria & Begoña Sanz - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):186-192.
    Human germline gene editing constitutes an extremely promising technology; at the same time, however, it raises remarkable ethical, legal, and social issues. Although many of these issues have been largely explored by the academic literature, there are gender issues embedded in the process that have not received the attention they deserve. This paper examines ways in which this new tool necessarily affects males and females differently—both in rewards and perils. The authors conclude that there is an urgent need to include (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Commentary on Rissfeldt: The Small Matter of the Doctor’s Autonomy.Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):263-269.
    In his article, Thomas Rissfeldt argues the compatibility of palliative care with euthanasia and assisted suicide.1 By his account, many working within the field of palliative care feel that euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are incompatible with palliative care. Wrongly, according to the author, since (1) the aims of palliative care and euthanasia/assisted suicide are not different, (2) euthanasia and assisted suicide are compatible with the fundamental role of the physician as healer, and (3) euthanasia and assisted suicide do not necessarily (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Reluctant Rulers: Policy, Politics, and Assisted Reproduction Technology in Japan.Silvia Croydon - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):289-299.
    This article puts the spotlight on the world’s largest artificial reproduction technology (ART) industry—that of Japan, seeking to explain the exceptional tardiness of the government there to install a comprehensive legal framework that regulates these practices. By relying on minutes from a conversation with an influential parliamentarian active in this area, as well as official documents, media reports, and an interview conducted with key physicians, the article reconstructs the historical trajectory leading to the enactment in December 2020 of the Assisted (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    Trusting the Government to Do the Right Thing: Data Ethics in Australia’s Pandemic Response.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):222-230.
    After a brief overview of ethical issues in an Australian context catalyzed by the current pandemic, this article focuses on data protection in the light of recent debates about COVID-19 data tracking in Australia and globally. This article looks at the issue of trust as a fundamental principle of effective and ethical COVID-safe measures undertaken by the government. Key to ensuring such trust are Habermasian participatory dialogs, which assume trust as a condition of authentic illocution, and an emphasis on short-term (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  80
    Healthcare Priorities: The “Young” and the “Old”.Ben Davies - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):174-185.
    Some philosophers and segments of the public think age is relevant to healthcare priority-setting. One argument for this is based in equity: “Old” patients have had either more of a relevant good than “young” patients or enough of that good and so have weaker claims to treatment. This article first notes that some discussions of age-based priority that focus in this way on old and young patients exhibit an ambiguity between two claims: that patients classified as old should have a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Fear of Dementia and the Obligation to Provide Aggregate Research Results to Study Participants—ADDENDUM.Mackenzie Graham, Francesca Farina, Craig W. Ritchie, Brian Lawlor & Lorina Naci - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):306-306.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  19
    Healthcare Professionals’ Conflicts When Treating Transgender Youth: Is It Necessary to Prioritize Protection Over Respect?Maximiliane Hädicke, Manuel Föcker, Georg Romer & Claudia Wiesemann - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):193-201.
    Increasingly, transgender minors are seeking medical care such as puberty-suppressing or gender-affirming hormone therapies. Yet, whether these interventions should be performed at all is highly controversial. Some healthcare practitioners oppose irreversible interventions, considering it their duty to protect children from harm. Others view minors, like adults, as transgender individuals who must be protected from discrimination. The underlying ethical question is presented as a problem of priority. Is it primarily relevant that minors are involved? Or should decision makers focus on the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  5
    Cost-Effectiveness, Incompleteness, and Discrimination.Anders Herlitz - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):163-173.
    This paper argues that cost-effectiveness analysis in the healthcare sector introduces a discrimination risk that has thus far been underappreciated and outlines some approaches one can take toward this. It is argued that appropriate standards used in cost-effectiveness analysis in the healthcare sector fail to always fully determine an optimal option, which entails that cost-effectiveness analysis often leaves decision makers with large sets of permissible options. Larger sets of permissible options increase the role of decision makers’ biases, whims, and prejudices, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    Improving the Implementation of Advance Directives in Spain.Benjamín Herreros, Pablo Gella, Emanuele Valenti, Octavio Márquez, Beatriz Moreno & Tayra Velasco - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):270-275.
    Since 2002, legislation in Spain has allowed for the creation and documentation of end-of-life decisionmaking. Over the intervening years, the actual implementation of such documents is very low. Through extensive analysis of the literature, this article explores the current status of the use of and attitudes toward advance directives in Spain and then proposes strategies for improvement in their implementation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  12
    Cost-Effectiveness and the Avoidance of Discrimination in Healthcare: Can We Have Both?Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):202-215.
    Many ethical theorists believe that a given distribution of healthcare is morally justified only if (1) it is cost-effective and (2) it does not discriminate against older adults and disabled people. However, if (3) cost-effectiveness involves maximizing the number of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) added by a given unit of healthcare resource, or cost, it seems the pursuit of cost-effectiveness will inevitably discriminate against older adults and disabled patients. I show why this trilemma is harder to escape than some theorists think. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  2
    QALYs, Disability Discrimination, and the Role of Adaptation in the Capacity to Recover: The Patient-Sensitive Health-Related Quality of Life Account.Julia Mosquera - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):154-162.
    Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) are two of the most commonly used health measures to determine resource prioritization and the population burden of disease, respectively. There are different types of problems with the use of QALYs and DALYs for measuring health benefits. Some of these problems have to do with measurement, for example, the weights they ascribe to health states might fail to reflect with exact accuracy the actual well-being or health levels of individuals. But even (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  1
    Motherhood, Fairness, and Flourishing: Widening Reproductive Choices in Saudi Arabia.Ruaim Muaygil - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):276-288.
    In a landmark Fatwa, Saudi Arabia’s highest religious authority—The Council of Senior Scholars—declared the Islamic permissibility of oocyte cryopreservation. The fatwa sanctioned the retrieval, preservation, and future use of oocytes, ovarian tissue, and whole ovaries from cancer patients receiving gonadotoxic interventions. Although momentous, the fatwa’s specification of cancer patients effectively rendered this technology unavailable to others to whom it may be similarly beneficial, including patients with other medical conditions or patients seeking elective cryopreservation. This article argues in favor of widening (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Ethical Acceptability of a Recipient’s Choice of Donor in Directed and Nondirected Transplantation: Japanese Perspective.Eisuke Nakazawa, Margie H. Shaw & Akira Akabayashi - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):216-221.
    In organ transplantation, there is a lack of ethical discussion about the recipient’s right not to receive a transplant. Using the current situation of living organ transplantation and deceased organ transplantation in Japan as an example, we prospectively discussed to what extent the recipient’s right not to receive a transplant is ethically acceptable. In directed transplantation from a living donor, a recipient may refuse organ donation from a particular donor. It is preferable that a recipient’s request for organ donation from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  3
    Disability Discrimination and Patient-Sensitive Health-Related Quality of Life.Lasse Nielsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):142-153.
    It is generally accepted that morally justified healthcare rationing must be non-discriminatory and cost-effective. However, given conventional concepts of cost-effectiveness, resources spent on disabled people are spent less cost-effectively, ceteris paribus, than resources spent on non-disabled people. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that standard cost-effectiveness discriminates against the disabled. Call this the disability discrimination problem. Part of the disability discrimination involved in cost-effectiveness stems from the way in which health-related quality of life is accounted for and measured. This paper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  75
    Clarifying the Discussion on Prioritization and Discrimination in Healthcare.Joona Räsänen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):139-140.
    Discrimination is an important real-life issue that affects many individuals and groups. It is also a fruitful field of study that intersects several disciplines and methods. This Special Section brings together papers on discrimination and prioritization in healthcare from leading scholars in bioethics and closely related fields.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  3
    Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Are Compatible with Palliative Care and Are Not Rendered Redundant by It.Thomas D. Riisfeldt - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):254-262.
    It is often argued by health professionals working within the field of palliative care that palliative care and euthanasia/assisted suicide are incompatible. Across the literature, this claim is grounded on the three claims that (1) palliative care and euthanasia/assisted suicide have different aims, (2) euthanasia/assisted suicide is at odds with the doctor’s fundamental role as a healer, and (3) euthanasia/assisted suicide constitutes patient abandonment. Furthermore, even if palliative care and euthanasia/assisted suicide are compatible, it is often argued that the availability (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  1
    Moral Distress Under Structural Violence: Clinician Experience in Brazil Caring for Low-Income Families of Children with Severe Disabilities.Ana Carolina Gahyva Sale & Carolyn Smith-Morris - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):231-243.
    Rigorous attention has been paid to moral distress among healthcare professionals, largely in high-income settings. More obscure is the presence and impact of moral distress in contexts of chronic poverty and structural violence. Intercultural ethics research and dialogue can help reveal how the long-term presence of morally distressing conditions might influence the moral experience and agency of healthcare providers. This article discusses mixed-methods research at one nongovernmental social support agency and clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Chronic levels of moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Moral Distress Under Structural Violence: Clinician Experience in Brazil Caring for Low-Income Families of Children with Severe Disabilities—ERRATUM.Ana Carolina Gahyva Sale & Carolyn Smith-Morris - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):305-305.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  1
    Mobile Health in China: Well Integrated or a New Divide?Lujia Sun & Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):244-253.
    The application of mobile health holds promises of achieving greater accessibility in the evolving health care sector. The active engagement of private actors drives its growth, while the challenges that exist between health care privatization and equitable access are a concern. This article selects the private internet hospital in China as a case study. It indicates that a market-oriented regulatory mechanism of private mobile health will contribute little to improving health equity from the perspectives of egalitarians and libertarians. By integrating (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  1
    Review of Dranove and Burns, 2021. Big Med: Megaproviders and the High Cost of Health Care in America[REVIEW]Lauren A. Taylor - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):300-304.
    David Dranove and Lawton Burn’s new collaboration Big Med: Megaproviders and the High Cost of Health Care in America provides readers with a comprehensive tutorial on consolidation in United States healthcare markets over the past 40 years. Although the book is most explicitly aimed at those who look around and wonder how we arrived at a healthcare landscape dominated by giants, anyone with a serious interest in the prices of U.S. healthcare will want to have this rigorous and timely treatment (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Reconsidering Capacity to Appoint a Healthcare Proxy.Jacob M. Appel - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):69-75.
    Clinicians are often called upon to assess the capacity of a patient to appoint a healthcare agent. Although a consensus has emerged that the standard for such assessment should differ from that for capacity to render specific healthcare decisions, exactly what standard should be employed remains unsettled and differs by jurisdiction. The current models in use draw heavily upon analogous methods used in clinical assessment, such as the “four skills” approach. This essay proposes an alternative model that relies upon categorization (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Anything Goes? Analyzing Varied Understandings of Assent.Giles Birchley - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):76-89.
    Assent to medical research or treatment may be an intuitively attractive way to address the area between incapacity and capacity that might otherwise be subject to a best interests assessment. Assent has become a widely disseminated concept in law, research, and clinical ethics, but little conceptual work on assent has so far occurred. An exploration of use of assent in treatment and research in children and people with dementia suggests that at least five claims are made on behalf of assent. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  20
    Existential Suffering as a Legitimization of Euthanasia.Jasper Doomen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):14-25.
    Several countries have legalized euthanasia on the basis of medically diagnosable suffering over the last decennial; the criteria to which they adhere differ. The topic of this article is euthanasia on the basis of existential suffering. This article presents a recent proposal to legalize euthanasia for people who experience such suffering and then discusses the issue of what the value of life may be, and whether the standard that life is normally something positive should be accepted. This provides the foundation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  1
    Bioethics, Ukraine, and the Peril of Silence.Joseph J. Fins - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):1-3.
    By considering the history of bioethics and international humanitarian law, Joseph J. Fins contends that bioethics as an academic and moral community should stand in solidarity with Ukraine as it defends freedom and civility.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  1
    Nudging, Bullshitting, and the Meta-Nudge.Scott D. Gelfand - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):56-68.
    In “Nudging, Bullshitting, and the Meta-Nudge”, the author responds to William Simkulet’s claim that nudging is bullshitting (according to Harry Frankfurt’s analysis of bullshit and bullshitting), and therefore nudging during the process of informed consent renders consent invalid. The author argues that nudging is not necessarily bullshitting and then explains that although this issue is philosophically interesting, practically speaking, even if nudging is bullshitting, it does not follow that nudging necessarily renders informed consent invalid. This is obviously true in those (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. A Response to Zambrano.John Harris - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):134-137.
    Alexander Zambrano sets out to refute an argument that I have made on a number of occasions over many years since 1992, which he calls “Harris’s Greater Need Argument” (2002).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  59
    Pandemic Rule-Breakers, Moral Luck, and Blaming the Blameworthy.Jesse Hill - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):41-47.
    This paper takes under consideration a piece by Roger Crisp in which he questions what the problem of moral luck can teach us about COVID-19 lockdown rule-breakers. Taking the position that although such rule-breakers might seem to be new examples of moral luck, Crisp ends up denying the existence of moral luck and argues that moral luck is an outdated notion in so far as it relies on other questionable aspects of morality, that is, retributivist punishment and blame. Although the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  3
    Frailty as a Priority-Setting Criterion for Potentially Lifesaving Treatment—Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, Circularity, and Indirect Discrimination?Søren Holm & Daniel Joseph Warrington - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):48-55.
    Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to poor resolution of homeostasis after a stressor event. Frailty is most frequently assessed in the old using the Clinical Frailty Scale (CSF) which ranks frailty from 1 to 9. This assessment typically takes less than one minute and is not validated in patients with learning difficulties or those under 65 years old. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) developed guidelines that use “frailty” as one of the priority-setting criteria for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  2
    Two Views of Vulnerability in the Evolution of Canada’s Medical Assistance in Dying Law.Sarah J. Lazin & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):105-117.
    Canada is six years into a new era of legalized medical assistance in dying (MAiD). The law continues to evolve, following a pattern in which Canadian courts rule that legal restrictions on eligibility for MAiD are unconstitutional and Parliament responds by gradually expanding eligibility for MAiD. The central tension underlying this dialogue between courts and government has focused on two conceptions of how to best promote and protect the interests of people who are vulnerable by virtue of intolerable and irremediable (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  3
    The Reification of Non-Human Animals.Silvia Caprioglio Panizza - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):90-104.
    This paper takes up Axel Honneth’s suggestion that we, in the 21st century Western world, should revisit the Marxian idea of reification; unlike Honneth, however, this paper applies reification to the ways in which humans relate to non-human animals, particularly in the context of scientific experiments. Thinking about these practices through the lens of reification, the paper argues, yields a more helpful understanding of what is regarded as problematic in those practices than the standard animal rights approaches. The second part (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  2
    Midlife: A Philosophical Guide by Kieran Setiya, Princeton University Press, 2017.Michael Ridge - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):118-122.
    CQ ReviewThe main goal of the Book Review Section of Cambridge Quarterly is to cultivate a place where scholars can share their thoughts on broad philosophical topics sparked by noteworthy books. Instead of focusing narrowly on works in healthcare ethics, our reviews cast a wider net so that we may reflect on diverse ideas. Please email [email protected] if you have book recommendations or if you are interested in writing a review.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  1
    Accepting Moral Luck and Taking Responsibility in Public Health Crises.Daniel Tigard - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):34-40.
    We see cases of moral luck arising in recent times, as we face the uncertainties of provisional rules for navigating the coronavirus pandemic. How should we respond to rule-breakers, and how should they view themselves, when they cause harm inadvertently? Although some argue that guilt is unnecessary for any harm that may result from luck, this paper takes moral luck seriously and encourages consideration of the benefits to be achieved by expressions of self-blame amidst troubling circumstances, from pure accidents to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  2
    Should the Dutch Law on Euthanasia Be Expanded to Include Children?A. A. E. Verhagen & Martin Buijsen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):5-13.
    The 2002 Dutch Euthanasia law applies to patients aged 12 years and older. Developments in end-of-life care and decision-making in the last decade have sparked the debate about usefulness and necessity to extend euthanasia to include children under 12 years of age. This paper describes two opposite positions: the affirmative position of a pediatrician and expert in pediatric palliative care and the negative position of a jurist and specialist in health law.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  4
    Health, Health Care, and Equality of Opportunity: The Rationale for Universal Health Care.Gry Wester - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):26-33.
    This article discusses what arguments best support universal health care (UHC), with a focus on Norman Daniels’ equality of opportunity account. This justification for UHC hinges on the assumption of a close relationship between health care and health. But in light of empirical research that suggests that health outcomes are shaped to a large extent by factors other than health care, such as income, education, housing, and working conditions, the question arises to what extent health care is really necessary to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  3
    Organ Conscription and Greater Needs.Alexander Zambrano - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):123-133.
    Since its inception, the institution of postmortem organ transplantation has faced the problem of organ shortage: Every year, the demand for donor organs vastly exceeds supply, resulting in the deaths of approximately 8,000 individuals in the United States alone.1 This is in large part due to the fact that the United States, for the most part, operates under an “opt-in” policy in which people are given the opportunity to voluntarily opt-in to organ donation by registering as organ donors.2 In the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues