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  1.  1
    Principles and Duties: A Critique of Common Morality Theory.Robert Baker - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):199-211.
    Tom Beauchamp and James Childress‘s revolutionary textbook, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, shaped the field of bioethics in America and around the world. Midway through the Principle’s eight editions, however, the authors jettisoned their attempt to justify the four principles of bioethics —autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice—in terms of ethical theory, replacing it with the idea that these principles are part of a common morality shared by all rational persons committed to morality, at all times, and in all places. Other commentators contend (...)
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  2.  4
    Common Morality Principles in Biomedical Ethics: Responses to Critics.James F. Childress & Tom L. Beauchamp - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):164-176.
    After briefly sketching common-morality principlism, as presented in Principles of Biomedical Ethics, this paper responds to two recent sets of challenges to this framework. The first challenge claims that medical ethics is autonomous and unique and thus not a form of, or justified or guided by, a common morality or by any external morality or moral theory. The second challenge denies that there is a common morality and insists that futile efforts to develop common-morality approaches to bioethics limit diversity and (...)
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  3.  3
    Mary Anne Warren and the Boundaries of the Moral Community.Timothy Furlan - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):230-246.
    In her important and well-known discussion “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion,” Mary Anne Warren regrets that “it is not possible to produce a satisfactory defense of a woman’s right to obtain an abortion without showing that the fetus is not a human being, in the morally relevant sense.” Unlike some more cautious philosophers, Warren thinks that we can definitively demonstrate that the fetus is not a person. In this paper, Warren’s argument is critically examined with a focus (...)
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  4.  8
    COVID-19 and Beyond: The Need for Copathy and Impartial Advisers.Matti Häyry - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):220-229.
    When humanity has either suppressed coronavirus disease 2019 or learned to come to terms with its continued existence, governments and corporations probably return to their prepandemic stances. Solutions to the world’s problems are sought from technology and business innovations, not from considerations of equality and well-being for all. This is in stark contrast with the pandemic-time situation. Many governments, at least initially, listened to the recommendations of expert advisers, most notably public health authorities, who proceeded from considerations of equality and (...)
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  5.  8
    COVID-19: Another Look at Solidarity.Matti Häyry - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):256-262.
    Is there such a thing as corona solidarity? Does voluntary mutual aid solve the problems caused by COVID-19? I argue that the answer to the first question is “yes” and to the second “no.” Not that the answer to the second question could not, in an ideal world, be “yes,” too. It is just that in this world of global capitalism and everybody looking out for themselves, the kind of communal warmth celebrated by the media either does not actually exist (...)
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  6.  1
    COVID-19: Another Look at Solidarity—ADDENDUM.Matti Häyry - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):279-279.
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  7.  2
    Common and Uncommon Moralities in Bioethics: Yet Another Final Countdown.Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):161-163.
  8.  1
    How to Deal with Counter-Examples to Common Morality Theory: A Surprising Result.Peter Herissone-Kelly - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):185-191.
    Tom Beauchamp and James Childress are confident that their four principles—respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice—are globally applicable to the sorts of issues that arise in biomedical ethics, in part because those principles form part of the common morality. Inevitably, however, the question arises of how the principlist ought to respond when presented with apparent counter-examples to this thesis. I examine a number of strategies the principlist might adopt in order to retain common morality theory in the face of (...)
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  9. What is the Foundation of Medical Ethics—Common Morality, Professional Norms, or Moral Philosophy?Søren Holm - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):192-198.
    This paper considers the relation between medical ethics and common morality, professional norms, and moral philosophy. It proceeds by analyzing two recent book-length critical analyses of this relationship by Bob Baker in “The Structure of Moral Revolutions—Studies of Changes in the Morality of Abortion, Death, and the Bioethics Revolution” and Rosamond Rhodes in “The Trusted Doctor—Medical Ethics and Professionalism.” It argues that despite the strengths of these critical arguments, there is nevertheless a relationship between ME, understood as the professional ethics (...)
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  10. Another Defense of Common Morality.Ruth Macklin - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):177-184.
    Robert Baker and Rosamond Rhodes each argue against the universality “common morality,” the approach to ethics that comprises four fundamental principles and their application in various settings. Baker contends that common morality cannot account for cultural diversity in the world and claims that a human rights approach is superior in the context of global health. Rhodes maintains that bioethics is not reducible to common morality because medical professionals have special privileges and responsibilities that people lack in everyday life. Baker fails (...)
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  11.  2
    Malignant: How Bad Policy and Bad Evidence Harm People with Cancer, by Vinay Prasad, Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020.Anya Plutynski - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):275-278.
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  12.  2
    What Should Engagement in Health Research Look Like? Perspectives From People with Lived Experience, Members of the Public, and Engagement Managers.Bridget Pratt - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):263-274.
    Engagement in health research is increasingly practised worldwide. Yet many questions remain under debate in the ethics field about its contribution to health research and these debates have largely not been informed by those who have been engaged in health research. This paper addresses the following key questions: what should the ethical goals of engagement in health research be and how should it be performed? Qualitative data were generated by interviewing 22 people with lived experience, members of the public, and (...)
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  13.  2
    The Uncommon Ethics of the Medical Profession: A Response to My Critics.Rosamond Rhodes - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):212-219.
    In responding to my critics, James Childress, Tom Beauchamp, Soren Holm, and Ruth Macklin, I reprise my arguments for medical ethics being an uncommon morality. I also elaborate on points that required further clarification. I explain the role of trust and trustworthiness in the creation of a profession. I also describe my views on the relationship of the medical profession to the society in which medicine is practiced. Finally, I defend my claim that medical ethics “is constructed by medical professionals (...)
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  14.  1
    Rethinking the Ethics of Pandemic Rationing: Egalitarianism and Avoiding Wrongs.Alex James Miller Tate - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):247-255.
    This paper argues that we ought to rethink the harm-reduction prioritization strategy that has shaped early responses to acute resource scarcity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although some authors have claimed that “[t]here are no egalitarians in a pandemic,” it is noted here that many observers and commentators have been deeply concerned about how prioritization policies that proceed on the basis of survival probability may unjustly distribute the burden of mortality and morbidity, even while reducing overall deaths. The paper further argues (...)
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  15.  1
    Name Dropping: Toward a Uniform Best Practice on Historical Commemoration in Medicine.Joseph M. Appel - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):16-22.
    The removal of controversial names and monuments from the public sphere in the United States has gained traction in the context of efforts to achieve social justice for historically mistreated and marginalized communities. Such debates are increasingly raising issues in the healthcare setting as hospitals and medical schools grapple with the legacies of figures whose scientific contributions are clouded with ethical transgressions. Present efforts to address these challenges have largely occurred at the institutional level. The results have been guidelines that (...)
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  16. Physician Authority, Family Choice, and the Best Interest of the Child.Alister Browne - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):34-39.
    Two of the most poignant decisions in pediatrics concern disagreements between physicians and families over imperiled newborns. When can the family demand more life-sustaining treatment than physicians want to provide? When can it properly ask for less? The author looks at these questions from the point of view of decision theory, and first argues that insofar as the family acts in the child’s best interest, its choices cannot be constrained, and that the maximax and minimax strategies are equally in the (...)
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  17.  1
    Mutatis Mutandis … On Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia in the Netherlands.Martin Buijsen - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):40-53.
    Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are common practice in the Netherlands. In response to increasing requests from patients to end their lives, physicians are finding themselves placed in particularly precarious situations because of advance directives written by patients suffering from severe dementia. In April 2020, the Supreme Court of the Netherlands issued two judgments in the so-called Dormicum case: a case involving the deliberate termination of the life of a 74-year-old woman suffering from advanced dementia by a geriatrician in a nursing (...)
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  18.  1
    Doctors as Appointed Fiduciaries: A Supplemental Model for Medical Decision-Making.Ben Davies & Joshua Parker - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):23-33.
    How should we respond to patients who do not wish to take on the responsibility and burdens of making decisions about their own care? In this paper, we argue that existing models of decision-making in modern healthcare are ill-equipped to cope with such patients and should be supplemented by an “appointed fiduciary” model where decision-making authority is formally transferred to a medical professional. Healthcare decisions are often complex and for patients can come at time of vulnerability. While this does not (...)
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  19.  1
    Being There: A Commentary on Göran Hermerén’s “A Future for Migrants with Acute Heart Problems Seeking Asylum?” (CQ 30 (2)). [REVIEW]Inez de Beaufort - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):150-159.
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  20.  1
    A Philosopher Goes to the Doctor: A Critical Look at Philosophical Assumptions in Medicine, by Dien Ho. New York: Routledge.Anna Magdalena Elsner - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):141-143.
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  21.  24
    Toward an Anti-Maleficent Research Agenda.Hope Ferdowsian, Agustin Fuentes, L. Syd M. Johnson, Barbara J. King & Jessica Pierce - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):54-58.
    Important advances in biomedical and behavioral research ethics have occurred over the past few decades, many of them centered on identifying and eliminating significant harms to human subjects of research. Comprehensive attention has not been paid to the totality of harms experienced by animal subjects, although scientific and moral progress require explicit appraisal of these harms. Science is a public good and the prioritizing within, conduct of, generation of, and application of research must soundly address questions about which research is (...)
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  22.  4
    Should Whole Genome Sequencing Be Publicly Funded for Everyone as a Matter of Healthcare Justice?Leonard M. Fleck & Leslie Francis - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):5-15.
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  23. On Algorithmic Fairness in Medical Practice.Thomas Grote & Geoff Keeling - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):83-94.
    The application of machine-learning technologies to medical practice promises to enhance the capabilities of healthcare professionals in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment, of medical conditions. However, there is growing concern that algorithmic bias may perpetuate or exacerbate existing health inequalities. Hence, it matters that we make precise the different respects in which algorithmic bias can arise in medicine, and also make clear the normative relevance of these different kinds of algorithmic bias for broader questions about justice and fairness in healthcare. (...)
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  24. The Pandemic Dilemma: When Philosophy Conflicts with Public Health.Dien Ho - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):1-3.
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  25.  1
    Ethics, Guidelines, Standards, and Policy: Telemedicine, COVID-19, and Broadening the Ethical Scope.Bonnie Kaplan - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):105-118.
    The coronavirus crisis is causing considerable disruption and anguish. However, the COVID-19 pandemic and consequent explosion of telehealth services also provide an unparalleled opportunity to consider ethical, legal, and social issues beyond immediate needs. Ethicists, informaticians, and others can learn from experience, and evaluate information technology practices and evidence on which to base policy and standards, identify significant values and issues, and revise ethical guidelines. This paper builds on professional organizations’ guidelines and ELSI scholarship to develop emerging concerns illuminated by (...)
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  26.  1
    The Moral Superiority of Bioengineered Wombs and Ectogenesis for Absolute Uterine Factor Infertility.Evie Kendal & Julian J. Koplin - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):73-82.
    This paper argues that uterine transplants are a potentially dangerous distraction from the development of alternative methods of providing reproductive options for women with absolute uterine factor infertility. We consider two alternatives in particular: the bioengineering of wombs using stem cells and ectogenesis. Whether biologically or mechanically engineered, these womb replacements could provide a way for women to have children, including genetically related offspring for those who would value this possibility. Most importantly, this alternative would avoid the challenge of sourcing (...)
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  27.  1
    From “What” to “How”: Experiential Learning in a Graduate Medicine for Ethicists Course.Jason D. Keune & Erica Salter - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):131-140.
    Teaching healthcare ethics at the doctoral level presents a particular challenge. Ethics is often taught to medical students, but rarely is medicine taught to graduate students in health care ethics. In this paper, Medicine for Ethicists [MfE] — a course taught both didactically and experientially — is described. Eight former MfE students were independently interviewed in a semi-structured, open-ended format regarding their experience in the experiential component of the course. Themes included concrete elements about the course, elements related to the (...)
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  28.  34
    Animal Research That Respects Animal Rights: Extending Requirements for Research with Humans to Animals.Angela K. Martin - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):59-72.
    The purpose of this article is to show that animal rights are not necessarily at odds with the use of animals for research. If animals hold basic moral rights similar to those of humans, then we should consequently extend the ethical requirements guiding research with humans to research with animals. The article spells out how this can be done in practice by applying the seven requirements for ethical research with humans proposed by Ezekiel Emanuel, David Wendler and Christine Grady to (...)
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  29.  5
    The Ethics of Algorithms in Healthcare.Christina Oxholm, Anne-Marie S. Christensen & Anette S. Nielsen - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):119-130.
    The amount of data available to healthcare practitioners is growing, and the rapid increase in available patient data is becoming a problem for healthcare practitioners, as they are often unable to fully survey and process the data relevant for the treatment or care of a patient. Consequently, there are currently several efforts to develop systems that can aid healthcare practitioners with reading and processing patient data and, in this way, provide them with a better foundation for decision-making about the treatment (...)
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  30.  3
    In Defense of Uncommon Morality.Rosamond Rhodes - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):144-149.
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  31.  6
    An Ethical Case for Medical Scribes.David Schwan - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):95-104.
    This article addresses ethical concerns with the use of electronic health records (EHRs) by physicians in clinical practice. It presents arguments for two claims. First, requiring physicians to maintain patient EHRs for medically unnecessary tasks is likely contributing to increased burnout, decreased quality of care, and potential risks to patient safety. Second, medical institutions have ethical reasons to employ medical scribes to maintain patient EHRs. Finally, this article reviews central objections to employing medical scribes and provides responses to each.
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