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  1. Retrieving the Moral in the Ethics of Maternal-Fetal Surgery.Virginia L. Bartlett & Mark J. Bliton - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):480-493.
    Open-uterine surgery to repair spina bifida, or ‘fetal surgery of open neural tube defects,’ has generated questions throughout its history—and continues to do so in a variety of contexts. As clinical ethics consultants who worked and trained at Vanderbilt University—where the first successful cases of open-uterine repair of spina bifida were carried out—we lived with these questions for nearly two decades. We worked with clinicians as they were developing and offering the procedure, with researchers in refining and studying the procedure, (...)
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  2. Pediatric Brain Tumors: Narrating Suffering and End-of-Life Decisionmaking.Marije Brouwer, Els Maeckelberghe, Henk-jan ten Brincke, Marloes Meulenbeek-ten Brincke & Eduard Verhagen - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):338-345.
    When talking about decisionmaking for children with a life-threatening condition, the death of children with brain tumors deserves special attention. The last days of the lives of these children can be particularly harsh for bystanders, and raise questions about the suffering of these children themselves. In the Netherlands, these children are part of the group for whom a wide range of end-of-life decisions are discussed, and questions raised. What does the end-of-life for these children look like, and what motivates physicians (...)
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  3. How to Legalize Medically Assisted Death in a Free and Democratic Society.Alister Browne & J. S. Russell - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):361-368.
    In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the criminal law prohibiting physician assisted death in Canada. In 2016, Parliament passed legislation to allow what it called ‘medical assistance in dying.’ The authors first describe the arguments the Court used to strike down the law, and then argue that MAID as legalized in Bill C-14 is based on principles that are incompatible with a free and democratic society, prohibits assistance in dying that should be permitted, and makes access to (...)
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  4. Commentary: Whose Suffering?Martin Buijsen - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):346-353.
    Marije Brouwer et al. contend that collecting treatment experiences of newborns with life-threatening conditions can support both caregivers and parents in making difficult end-of-life decisions. They illustrate the importance of that understanding by narrating the heartbreaking story of the sisters Roos and Noor, two newborns in the last stage of their lives.1.
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  5. And What About the Pharmacist?Martin Buijsen & Wilma Göttgens - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):375-385.
    In the Netherlands, euthanasia has been decriminalized. Termination of life on request and assisted suicide are criminal offences under Dutch law; but if physicians comply with the due care requirements of the Euthanasia Act and report their actions in the manner prescribed by law, they will not be prosecuted. One of the requirements relates to the act of euthanasia itself. If this is to be performed with due medical care, the physician relies on the services of a pharmacist. However, the (...)
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  6. Death and Disbelief.Robert A. Burton - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):403-403.
    A middle-aged woman had a massive stroke and would be dead within hours. The husband was in the ER waiting room. I took him aside and explained the grim prognosis. He paused, his expression blank, his lips searching for something to say. Finally, he blurted out, “I think I’ll go home and take a shower.”.
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  7. Avoiding Gender Exploitation and Ethics Dumping in Research with Women.Julie Cook - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):470-479.
    There is a long history of women being underrepresented in biomedical and health research. Specific women’s health needs have been, and in some cases still are, comparatively neglected areas of study. Concerns about the health and social impacts of such bias and exclusion have resulted in inclusion policies from governments, research funders, and the scientific establishment since the 1990s. Contemporary understandings of foregrounding sex and gender issues within biomedical research range from women’s rights to inclusion, to links between human rights, (...)
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  8. From Death to Life: Ethical Issues in Postmortem Sperm Retrieval as a Source of New Life.Brian M. Cummings & John J. Paris - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):369-374.
    This paper examines and critiques the ethical issues in postmortem sperm retrieval and the use of postmortem sperm to create new life. The article was occasioned by the recent request of the parents of a West Point cadet who died in a skiing accident at the Academy to retrieve and use his sperm to honor his memory and perpetuate the family name. The request occasioned national media attention. A trial court judge in New York in a two-page order authorized both (...)
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  9. Counting Cases of Termination of Life Without Request: New Dances with Data.Govert den Hartogh - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):395-402.
    This paper explores the common argument proposed by opponents of the legalization of euthanasia that permitting ending a patient’s life at their request will lead to the eventual legalization of terminating life without request. The author’s examination of data does not support the conclusion that a causal connection exists between legalizing ending of life on request and an increase in the number of cases without request.
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  10. Commentary: Medical Ethics: A Distinctive Species of Ethics.Leonard M. Fleck - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):421-425.
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  11. Commentary: Beyond Common or Uncommon Morality.Leslie Francis - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):426-428.
    In “Medical Ethics: Common or Uncommon Morality,”1 Rosamond Rhodes defends a specialist view of medical ethics, specifically the ethics of physicians. Rhodes’s account is specifically about the ethics of medical professionals, rooted in what these professionals do. It would seem to follow that other healthcare professions might be subject to ethical standards that differ from those applicable to physicians, rooted in what these other professions do, but I leave this point aside for purposes of this commentary. Rhodes’s view includes both (...)
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  12. Death and Irreversibility.Nada Gligorov - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):334-336.
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  13. Thinking About Difficulties: Using Poetry to Enhance Interpretative and Collaborative Skills in Healthcare Ethics Education.Amy Haddad - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):459-469.
    Viewing difficulty as an opportunity for learning runs counter to the common view of difficulty as a source of frustration and confusion. The aim of this article is to focus on the idea of difficulty as a stepping-off point for learning. The literature on difficulty in reading texts, and its impact on thinking and the interpretive process, serve as a foundation for the use of poetry in healthcare ethics education. Because of its complexity and strangeness compared to the usual scientific (...)
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  14. Conceptual Barriers to Palliative Care and Enlightenment From Chuang-Tze’s Thoughts.Junxiang Liu, Tianyu Zhang, Yiyao Lian, Fei Li & Xiaohong Ning - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):386-394.
    This paper claims that palliative care is a suitable approach for offering comprehensive support to patients with life-threatening illness and unavoidable asthenia, to enhance their quality of life in aging and chronic illness. There are however some conceptual barriers to accessing that care on the Chinese Mainland: Death-denying culture and society; Misguidance and malpractice derived from the biomedical model; Prejudice against PC and certain deviant understandings of filial piety culture. To counter these obstacles, the study introduces the philosophy of Chinese (...)
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  15. Neuroscience-Based Psychiatric Assessments of Criminal Responsibility: Beyond Self-Report?Gerben Meynen - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):446-458.
    Many legal systems have an insanity defense, which means that although a person has committed a crime, she is not held criminally responsible for the act. A challenge with regard to these assessments is that forensic psychiatrists have to rely to a considerable extent on the defendant's self-report. Could neuroscience be a way to make these evaluations more objective? The current value of neuroimaging in insanity assessments will be examined. The author argues that neuroscience can be valuable for diagnosing neurological (...)
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  16. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: From Aggressive Treatment to Care of the Dying, Insights From Art and Poetry.John J. Paris, Shelby Vallandingham, Brian Cummings & Ronald Cohen - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):354-360.
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  17. Medical Ethics: Common or Uncommon Morality?Rosamond Rhodes - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):404-420.
    This paper challenges the long-standing and widely accepted view that medical ethics is nothing more than common morality applied to clinical matters. It argues against Tom Beauchamp and James Childress’s four principles; Bernard Gert, K. Danner Clouser and Charles Culver’s ten rules; and Albert Jonsen, Mark Siegler, and William Winslade’s four topics approaches to medical ethics. First, a negative argument shows that common morality does not provide an account of medical ethics and then a positive argument demonstrates why the medical (...)
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  18. Tainted Largess: A Moral Framework For Medical School Donations.Charles Sanky & Jacob M. Appel - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):437-445.
    Rather than being a neutral phenomenon, the authors propose that medical school donations should be viewed as a social good for advancing education and improving healthcare. Seen in this light, they aim to offer a framework for analysis that will be useful to medical institutions and their stakeholders in addressing proposed donations from contentious or divisive sources, and in managing those donations that subsequently appear controversial.
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  19. Commentary: In Search of Medical Ethics and Its Foundation with Rosamond Rhodes.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (3):429-436.
    In her thorough and thoughtful contribution to the Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics titled “Medical Ethics: Common or Uncommon Morality” Rosamond Rhodes argues that contrary to American mainstream bioethics, medical ethics is not, and should not be, based on common morality, but rather, that the medical profession requires its own distinctive morality.1 She goes on to list sixteen duties that, according to her, form the core of medical ethics proper.
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  20. Harm, Truth, and the Nocebo Effect.Dien Ho - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (2):236-245.
     
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  21.  1
    Commentary: Should the Belmont Report Be Extended to Animal Research.Bernardo Aguilera & David Wendler - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):58-66.
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  22. O Tempora! O Mores! The Place of Boni Mores in Dignity Discourse.Jonathan Brown - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):144-155.
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  23. Commentary: A Belmont Report for Animals: An Idea Whose Time Has Come.Alka Chandna - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):46-53.
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  24.  9
    The Ethics of Medical AI and the Physician-Patient Relationship.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):115-121.
    :This article considers recent ethical topics relating to medical AI. After a general discussion of recent medical AI innovations, and a more analytic look at related ethical issues such as data privacy, physician dependency on poorly understood AI helpware, bias in data used to create algorithms post-GDPR, and changes to the patient–physician relationship, the article examines the issue of so-called robot doctors. Whereas the so-called democratization of healthcare due to health wearables and increased access to medical information might suggest a (...)
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  25.  1
    Reevaluating Benefits in the Moral Justification of Animal Research: A Comment on “Necessary Conditions for Morally Responsible Animal Research”.Matthias Eggel, Carolyn P. Neuhaus & Herwig Grimm - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):131-143.
    :In a recent paper in Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics on the necessary conditions for morally responsible animal research David DeGrazia and Jeff Sebo claim that the key requirements for morally responsible animal research are an assertion of sufficient net benefit, a worthwhile-life condition, and a no-unnecessary-harm condition. With regards to the assertion of sufficient net benefit, the authors claim that morally responsible research offers unique benefits to humans that outweigh the costs and harms to humans and animals. In this (...)
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  26.  10
    A Belmont Report for Animals?—Erratum.Hope Ferdowsian, L. Syd M. Johnson, Jane Johnson, Andrew Fenton, Adam Shriver & John Gluck - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):19-37.
    :Human and animal research both operate within established standards. In the United States, criticism of the human research environment and recorded abuses of human research subjects served as the impetus for the establishment of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research, and the resulting Belmont Report. The Belmont Report established key ethical principles to which human research should adhere: respect for autonomy, obligations to beneficence and justice, and special protections for vulnerable individuals and (...)
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  27.  5
    A Belmont Report for Animals?—Erratum.Hope Ferdowsian, L. Syd M. Johnson, Jane Johnson, Andrew Fenton, Adam Shriver & John Gluck - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):163-163.
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  28.  9
    In Memoriam. Dan Callahan: Writing a Life in Bioethics.Joseph J. Fins - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):4-8.
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  29.  3
    Commentary: Other Animals as Kin and Persons Worthy of Increased Ethical Consideration.Agustín Fuentes - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):38-41.
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  30.  4
    Xenia: Refugees, Displaced Persons and Reciprocity.John Harris - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):9-17.
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  31.  12
    The Immoral Machine.John Harris - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):71-79.
    :In a recent paper in Nature1 entitled The Moral Machine Experiment, Edmond Awad, et al. make a number of breathtakingly reckless assumptions, both about the decisionmaking capacities of current so-called “autonomous vehicles” and about the nature of morality and the law. Accepting their bizarre premise that the holy grail is to find out how to obtain cognizance of public morality and then program driverless vehicles accordingly, the following are the four steps to the Moral Machinists argument:1)Find out what “public morality” (...)
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  32.  2
    Commentary: Trust but Verify.Lisa Jones-Engel - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):42-45.
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  33.  4
    Giving Children a Say Without Giving Them a Choice: Obtaining Affirmation of a Child’s Non-Dissent to Participation in Nonbeneficial Research.Holly Kantin - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):80-97.
    :To what extent, if any, should minors have a say about whether they participate in research that offers them no prospect of direct benefit? This article addresses this question as it pertains to minors who cannot understand enough about what their participation would involve to make an autonomous choice, but can comprehend enough to have and express opinions about participating. The first aim is to defend David Wendler and Seema Shah’s claim that minors who meet this description should not be (...)
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  34.  2
    A Dashboard to Improve the Alignment of Healthcare Organization Decisionmaking to Core Values and Mission Statement.Timothy Lahey & William Nelson - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):156-162.
    :The mission and value statements of healthcare organizations serve as the foundational philosophy that informs all aspects of the organization. The ultimate goal is seamless alignment of values to mission in a way that colors the overall life and culture of the organization. However, full alignment between healthcare organizational values and mission in a fashion that influences the daily life and culture of healthcare organizations does not always occur. Grounded in the belief that a lack of organizational alignment to explicit (...)
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  35.  1
    Commentary: On The Moral Bindingness of Advance Directives.Stephen Latham - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):110-114.
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  36.  2
    Commentary: A Belmont Report for Animals? Rights or Welfare?Lori Marino - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):67-70.
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  37. Advance Healthcare Directives: Binding or Informational Value?Gianluca Montanari Vergallo - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):98-109.
    :Advance directives entail a refusal expressed by a still-healthy patient. Three consequences stem from that fact: advance refusal is unspecific, since it is impossible to predict what the patient’s conditions and the risk-benefit ratio may be in the foreseeable future; those decisions cannot be as well informed as those formulated while the disease is in progress; while both current consent and refusal can be revoked as the disease unfolds, until the treatment starts out, advance directives become effective when the patient (...)
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  38.  4
    Commentary: On the Moral Foundations of Animal Welfare.Bernard E. Rollin & Matthew S. Hickey - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):54-57.
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  39.  4
    Modelling the Social Dynamics of Moral Enhancement: Social Strategies Sold Over-the-Counter and the Stability of Society—ADDENDUM.Anders Sandberg & Joao Fabiano - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):164-164.
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  40.  2
    Is Human Enhancement in Space a Moral Duty? Missions to Mars, Advanced AI and Genome Editing in Space.Konrad Szocik - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):122-130.
    :Any space program involving long-term human missions will have to cope with serious risks to human health and life. Because currently available countermeasures are insufficient in the long term, there is a need for new, more radical solutions. One possibility is a program of human enhancement for future deep space mission astronauts. This paper discusses the challenges for long-term human missions of a space environment, opening the possibility of serious consideration of human enhancement and a fully automated space exploration, based (...)
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