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  1.  4
    Roguish Self-Fashioning and Questing in Aleksandar Hemon’s “Everything”.Jason Blake - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):100-117.
    This paper examines self-fashioning in Aleksandar Hemon’s “Everything,” a story about a Sarajevo teenager’s journey through ex-Yugoslavia to the Slovenian town of Murska Sobota. His aim? “[T]o buy a freezer chest for my family”. While in transit, the first-person narrator imagines himself a rogue of sorts; the fictional journey he takes, meanwhile, is clearly within the quest tradition. The paper argues that “Everything” is an unruly text because by the end of the story the reader must jettison the conventional reading (...)
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  2.  4
    The Outlaw Machine, the Monstrous Outsider and Motorcycle Fetishists: Challenging Rebellion, Mobility and Masculinity in Kenneth Anger’s "Scorpio Rising" and Steven Spielberg’s "Duel".Kornelia Boczkowska - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):81-99.
    The paper analyzes the ways in which Kenneth Anger’s Scorpio Rising and Steven Spielberg’s Duel draw on and challenge selected road movie conventions by adhering to the genre’s traditional reliance on cultural critique revolving around the themes of rebellion, transgression and roguery. In particular, the films seem to confront the classic road movie format through their adoption of nomadic narrative structure and engagement in a mockery of subversion where the focus on social critique is intertwined with a deep sense of (...)
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  3.  2
    “Same Old Ed,... Uncommitted”: BMW Socialism and Post-Roguery in Guy Vanderhaeghe’s Early Fiction.Jordan Bolay - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):118-136.
    In this paper I assess how Guy Vanderhaeghe’s early fiction criticizes the class-based and civil movements of post-1960s Saskatchewan through the recurring character of Ed. The protagonist of “Man Descending” and “Sam, Soren, and Ed” from Man Descending, the uncollected “He Scores! He Shoots!” and the novel My Present Age, Ed both condemns and epitomizes the contaminated and seductive gestures of the movements’ influences and enterprises. Vanderhaeghe deploys layers of social criticism: the first comments on the new urban progressive generation—the (...)
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  4.  2
    Men Without Fingers, Men Without Toes.Kit Dobson - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):185-196.
    What happens once the rogue rides off into the sunset? This cross-genre essay considers the figure of the rogue’s decline and gradual dismemberment in the face of the pressures of the world. Beginning with the “rogue” digits and other body parts lost by the men who surrounded him in his youth—especially his grandfather—Dobson considers the costs of labour and poverty in rural environments. For him, the rogue is one who falls somehow outside of cultural, social, and political norms—the one who (...)
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  5.  4
    Joe Brainard’s "I Remember", Fragmentary Life Writing and the Resistance to Narrative and Identity.Wojciech Drąg - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):223-236.
    Paul Ricoeur declares that “being-entangled in stories” is an inherent property of the human condition. He introduces the notion of narrative identity—a form of identity constructed on the basis of a self-constructed life-narrative, which becomes a source of meaning and self-understanding. This article wishes to present chosen instances of life writing whose subjects resist yielding a life-story and reject the notions of narrative and identity. In line with Adam Phillips’s remarks regarding Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes, such works—which I refer (...)
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  6.  2
    Spaces of (Re)Connections: Performing Experiences of Disabling Gender Violence.Nicole Fayard - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):273-291.
    The article explores the potential “healing” role performance art can have when representing disabling trauma, and engaging, as part of the creative process, participants who have experienced in their lives significant trauma and physical, as well as mental health concerns arising from gender violence. It focuses on the show cicatrix macula, performed during the exhibition Speaking Out: Women Healing from the Trauma of Violence. The exhibition involved disabled visual and creative artists, and engaged participants in the process of performance making. (...)
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  7.  3
    “Let Me Hear Thy Voice”: Michèle Roberts’s Refiguring of Mary Magdalene in the Light of The Song of Songs.Dorota Filipczak - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):199-212.
    The article engages with the protagonist of The Secret Gospel of Mary Magdalene by Michèle Roberts, first published in 1984 as The Wild Girl. Filipczak discusses scholarly publications that analyze the role of Mary Magdalene, and redeem her from the sexist bias which reduced her to a repentant whore despite the lack of evidence for this in the Gospels. The very same analyses demonstrate that the role of Mary Magdalene as Christ’s first apostle silenced by patriarchal tradition was unique. While (...)
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  8.  2
    What Ever Happened to My Peace of Mind? Hag Horror as Narrative of Trauma.Tomasz Fisiak - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):316-327.
    In his pioneering study of Grande Dame Guignol, a female-centric 1960s subgenre of horror film, Peter Shelley explains that the grande dame, a stock character in this form of cinematic expression, “may pine for a lost youth and glory, or she may be trapped by idealized memories of childhood, with a trauma that haunts her past”. Indeed, a typical Grande Dame Guignol female protagonist/antagonist usually deals with various kinds of traumatic experiences: loss of a child, domestic violence, childhood abuse, family (...)
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  9.  3
    “But What a Place / to Put a Piano”: Nostalgic Objects in Robert Minhinnick’s "Diary of the Last Man".Agata Handley - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):331-344.
    In 2003, Martin Rees referred to the present as “mankind’s final century.” A few years later, Slavoj Žižek wrote that humankind is heading towards “apocalyptic zero-point,” when the ecological crisis will most probably lead to our complete destruction. In his 2017 collection, Diary of the Last Man, Welsh poet Robert Minhinnick offers readers a meditation upon Earth at a liminal moment—on the brink of becoming completely unpopulated. Imagining a solitary human being, living in the midst of environmental collapse, Minhinnick yet (...)
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  10.  3
    On Unruly Text, or Text-Trickster: Leslie Marmon Silko’s "Ceremony" as Healing.Monika Kocot - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):292-315.
    The article discusses Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony with a focus on textual manifestations of the figure of the trickster. The theme of shape-shifting and transformation that one usually associates with tricksters is linked here with the theme of dualist timespace, the notion of interbeing, which in turn introduces the theme of trauma healing. The author combines two perspectives—Paula Gunn Allen’s view on timespace in her The Sacred Hoop, and Gerald Vizenor’s writings concerning trickster aesthetics—in order to show that the narrative (...)
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  11.  49
    A Wild Roguery: Bruce Chatwin’s "The Songlines" Reconsidered.Christine Nicholls - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):22-49.
    This article revisits, analyzes and critiques Bruce Chatwin’s 1987 bestseller, The Songlines,1 more than three decades after its publication. In Songlines, the book primarily responsible for his posthumous celebrity, Chatwin set out to explore the essence of Central and Western Desert Aboriginal Australians’ philosophical beliefs. For many readers globally, Songlines is regarded as a—if not the—definitive entry into the epistemological basis, religion, cosmology and lifeways of classical Western and Central Desert Aboriginal people. It is argued that Chatwin’s fuzzy, ill-defined use (...)
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  12.  5
    “A Right Kind of Rogue”: Lisa McInerney’s "The Glorious Heresies" (2015) and "The Blood Miracles".Katarzyna Ostalska - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):237-258.
    The following article analyzes two novels, published recently by a new, powerful voice in Irish fiction, Lisa McInerney: her critically acclaimed debut The Glorious Heresies and its continuation The Blood Miracles. McInerney’s works can be distinguished by the crucial qualities of the Irish Noir genre. The Glorious Heresies and The Blood Miracles are presented from the perspective of a middle-aged “right-rogue” heroine, Maureen Phelan. Due to her violent and law-breaking revenge activities, such as burning down the institutions signifying Irishwomen’s oppression (...)
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  13.  2
    Poetry, Environment and the Possibility of Future. A Review of Sam Solnick’s "Poetry and the Anthropocene: Ecology, Biology and Technology in Contemporary British and Irish Poetry". [REVIEW]Wit Pietrzak - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):395-402.
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  14.  3
    New Versions of Roguery.Vanja Polić & Aritha van Herk - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):9-21.
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  15.  4
    Don DeLillo’s "White Noise": A Virilian Perspective.Bahareh Bagherzadeh Samani & Hossein Pirnajmuddin - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):356-373.
    Don DeLillo’s White Noise depicts a world of rapid techno-scientific and economical changes. Paul Virilio’s concepts of dromology and speed, as well as his notions of accident and technology, seem to be the most relevant in order to examine a novel centrally concerned with change, speed and technology. This article first offers an analysis of White Noise in the light of Virilio’s concept of integral accident in relation to the negative consequences brought about by industrial and technological progress. This is (...)
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  16.  2
    The Lynching and Rebirth of Ned Buntline: Rogue Authorship During the American Literary Renaissance.Mark Metzler Sawin - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):167-184.
    Though largely unknown today, “Ned Buntline” was one of the most influential authors of 19th-century America. He published over 170 novels, edited multiple popular and political publications, and helped pioneer the seafaring adventure, city mystery and Western genres. It was his pirate tales that Tom Sawyer constantly reenacted, his “Bowery B’hoys” that came to define the distinctive slang and swagger of urban American characters, and his novels and plays that turned an unknown scout into Buffalo Bill, King of the Border (...)
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  17.  2
    Of Grim Witches and Showy Lady-Devils: Wealthy Women in Literature and Film.Veronika Schuchter - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):50-65.
    Imagining super rich women in the real and fictional world has long been a struggle. Those few depictions that do exist are scattered across time periods and literary genres, reflecting the legal restrictions that, at different points in time, would not allow women to accumulate assets independent of the patriarchal forces in their lives. The scarcity of extremely wealthy women in literature and film is confirmed by Forbes magazine’s list of the fifteen richest fictional characters that features forty different fictional (...)
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  18.  3
    Aussies, Rogues and Slackers: Simon Hanselmann’s Megg, Mogg and Owl Comics as Contemporary Instances of Rogue Literature.Ronnie Scott - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):137-152.
    This paper examines the Megg, Mogg and Owl stories of Simon Hanselmann, an Australian artist whose serialized comics both depict acts of contemporary roguery committed by a group of friends in an inner city sharehouse and test the generic limits of its own storytelling conventions, thereby becoming contemporary instances of “rogue texts.” The paper positions the adventures of Megg, a witch, Mogg, her familiar, Owl, their housemate, and associated characters including Booger and Werewolf Jones as contemporary variations of both the (...)
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  19.  3
    The Rogue as an Artist in Patrick deWitt’s "The Sisters Brothers".Hilde Staels - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):153-166.
    This article explores Eli Sisters as a reinvigorated rogue who finds his artistic calling in Patrick deWitt’s The Sisters Brothers, published in 2011. With the help of insights from narratology and genre theory, the article provides a textual analysis of Eli’s discourse, perspective and behaviour. Eli casts a critical light on the senseless violence, unbridled greed, ecological devastation, and hyper-masculinity inherent to America’s Frontier myth. As a reinvigorated rogue, he raises questions about what it means to be human and reflects (...)
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  20.  5
    Theater Without a Script—Improvisation and the Experimental Stage of the Early Mid-Twentieth Century in the United States.Magdalena Szuster - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):374-392.
    It was in the mid-twentieth century that the independent theatrical form based entirely on improvisation, known now as improvisational/improvised theatre, impro or improv, came into existence and took shape. Viola Spolin, the intellectual and the logician behind the improvisational movement, first used her improvised games as a WPA worker running theater classes for underprivileged youth in Chicago in 1939. But it was not until 1955 that her son, Paul Sills, together with a college theater group, the Compass Players, used Spolin’s (...)
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  21.  2
    Review of "White" by Bret Easton Ellis. [REVIEW]Mark Tardi - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):403-407.
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  22.  4
    Liminal Space in J. G. Ballard’s "Concrete Island".Marcin Tereszewski - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):345-355.
    This article explores the way in which surrealist techniques and assumptions underpin spatial representations in Ballard’s Concrete Island. With much of Ballard’s fiction using spatiality as an ideologically charged instrument to articulate a critique that underpins postcapitalist culture, it seems important to focus on exactly the kind of spaces that he creates. This paper will investigate the means by which spatiality is conceptualized in Ballard’s fiction, with special emphasis on places situated on the borders between realism and fantasy. Ballard’s spaces, (...)
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  23.  2
    “You’Ll Never Meet Someone Like Me Again”: Patty Jenkins’s "Monster" as Rogue Cinema.Michelle D. Wise - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):66-80.
    Film is a powerful medium that can influence audience’s perceptions, values and ideals. As filmmaking evolved into a serious art form, it became a powerful tool for telling stories that require us to re-examine our ideology. While it remains popular to adapt a literary novel or text for the screen, filmmakers have more freedom to pick and choose the stories they want to tell. This freedom allows filmmakers to explore narratives that might otherwise go unheard, which include stories that feature (...)
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  24.  2
    Heresy and Orthodoxy Now: The Zigzagging Paths of the Lawful.Marta Zając - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):213-222.
    In this article I consider a certain characteristic of our times as a “secular age,” namely, a series of complications in our understanding of transgression. Transgression implies the presence of some rules and laws which can be violated. As long as the rules and laws are perceived as right, as a way of protecting the values which would otherwise perish, transgression appears to be a wrong thing to do, a misdeed, a criminal act. Needless to say, the very conceptual structure (...)
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  25.  3
    Three Layers of Metaphors in Ross Macdonald’s "Black Money".Lech Zdunkiewicz - 2019 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 9 (9):259-270.
    In his early career, Kenneth Millar, better known as Ross Macdonald, emulated the style of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. By the 1960s he had established himself as a distinct voice in the hardboiled genre. In his Lew Archer series, he conveys the complexity of his characters and settings primarily by the use of metaphors. In his 1966 novel Black Money the device performs three functions. In the case of minor characters, the author uses metaphors to comment on Californian society. (...)
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