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  1.  28
    The Non-State Actor and International Law: A Challenge to State Primacy?J. Howley - 2009 - Dialogue: Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. 7 (1):1-19.
    With the emergence of powerful non-state actors onto the international plane, it has been necessary for international law to adapt and recognise legal actors other than the sovereign state. This article contends that it is essential that international legal recognition now be extended to multinational corporations and nongovernmental organisations. This ensures that such actors cannot escape accountability for violations of international law but also that they granted legitimate rights as participants in the international system. Such a development does not require (...)
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  2.  3
    Eagle Vs. Dragon Show Cancelled Due to Popular Uprising: A Discursive Analysis of US and Chinese Engagement in Africa and the Silencing of Alternatives.G. Karavas - 2009 - Dialogue: Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. 7 (1):x-x.
    China’s recent engagement with Africa has attracted a significant amount of attention among United States (US) policymakers, academics, journalists and think tanks. By exploring this commentary through an emerging dominant discourse on China’s engagement in Africa, this article argues that it is interwoven with a discourse on US engagement in Africa, performing a Manichean dynamics that reflects analysis of China’s engagement in Africa through a US lens. As a result, alternative discourses and insights are silenced as China’s engagement in Africa (...)
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  3.  4
    Aluta Continua: The Struggle Continues in South Africa - Against Violent Crime.E. Whyte - 2009 - Dialogue: Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. 7 (1):1-30.
    Concerns for safety and security as South Africa’s hosting of 2010 FIFA World Cup draws nearer highlight the degree to which South Africa’s reputation for a relatively peaceful transition from Apartheid has been replaced by its reputation for violent crime. Its transition, and the peacebuilding efforts that followed it, are not completely unrelated to its current high levels of violent crime. In fact, this article argues that there were a number of issues South Africa’s peacebuilding process failed to address that (...)
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