21 found

Year:

  1.  13
    Non-Analysis: From the Restrained Unconscious to the Generalized Unconscious.Nicholas Eppert - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):86-101.
    This paper is a contribution to the ongoing studies revolving around the fields of Afro-Pessimism and Non-Philosophy. It is focused mostly on a short essay that Francois Laruelle wrote in 1989 called "The Concept of Generalized Analysis or 'Non-Analysis" that eventually became part of a larger work called Theorie des Etrangers, while also drawing on the latter for support. The focus is set not in terms of exegesis or commentary but in tandem with the work of Frank Wilderson III to (...)
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  2.  3
    La Voix du Philosophe Laruelle.Gilbert Kieffer - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):121-131.
    The Voice of Laruelle, the philosopher What is a voice in the context of the arts and philosophy? In the space of the philosopher's voice, in the complex grammar of his language is played his philosophical timbre, his own space, his particular voice, composed of concepts, articulated by the laws of coherence of the common philosophical language, with hypnotic specificities. These specificities are precisely the fruit of processes formerly called rhetoric, which I call non-hypnotics, one of whose functions is just (...)
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  3.  4
    Peace Between Trotskyism and Maoism: Non-Maoism and Double Superposition.Adam Louis Klein - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):72-85.
    Non-Philosophy is a rigorous practice that can have useful applications for academic researchers and political activists alike. Utilizing its methods and frameworks, it is possible to bring Peace into the endless War of sectarian tendencies in which "the Left" is mired. In the following paper, we apply the technique of Non-Philosophy to Josh Moufawad-Paul's pamphlet "Maoism or Trotskyism," taking it as an instance of occasional material to be transformed. An important aspect of this analysis is a syntactical deployment of Non-Philosophy (...)
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  4.  9
    Philosophy as Capitalism and the Socialist Radically Metaphysical Response to It.Katerina Kolozova - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):57-71.
    The author starts from the thesis that there is no such thing as a "natural" or "apolitical" economy. The economy is always already political, as it is the economy’s material core of power, control, and its main mechanisms, i.e. exploitation and oppression. It is no less so in the era of neoliberalism, a time in which we witness the divorce between capitalism and democracy. In order to lay the foundations of a different economy, one that is not based on wage (...)
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  5.  22
    A mood for Philosophy.François Laruelle & Anne-Françoise Schmid - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):14-21.
    _A mood for Philosophy_ __ _ _ _In this dialogue with Francois Laruelle Anne-Françoise Schmidt suggests that Laruelle's non-philosophy, which begins with an indecision, could be conceived as something that in the history of painting has been called figura serpentinata, "serpentine line". This line, which produces a kind of music by the use of concepts, is visible according her trough his whole work: from his first book on Ravaisson, _Phenomenon and Difference,_ through to his last one, _The Last Humanity: A (...)
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  6.  11
    Le sens-sans-signe: Pour une éthique de la création.Benoît Maire & Anne-Françoise Schmid - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):132-139.
    The following article is the result of a collaboration between a painter and a woman philosopher. They worked previously on an experimental documentary film about objects and art objects, which was realized at Palais de Tokyo. The painter had illustrated in black and white fictions of philosophy, written during a festival on lost films organized by UNdocumenta in South Korea, and then he made photographs of oil paintings of the English translation. This article about painting and philosophical ethics is their (...)
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  7.  15
    From the Philosophy of Theatre to Performance Philosophy: Laruelle, Badiou and the Equality of Thought.Laura Cull Ó Maoilearca - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):102-120.
    This article draws from François Laruelle's non-standard philosophy to locate gestures of philosophical "authority"or 'sufficiency"within recent work in the philosophy of theatre –including material from contemporary Anglo-American philosophical aesthetics, and texts by Alain Badiou, such as In Praise of Theatre(2015). Whilst Badiou initially appears magnanimous in relation to theatre's own thinking -famously describing theatre as "an event of thought" that "directly produces ideas"(Badiou 2005: 72) -I argue that this very benevolence, from a Laruellean perspective, constitutes another form of philosophical authoritarianism. (...)
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  8.  13
    Victims, Power and Intellectuals: Laruelle and Sartre.Constance L. Mui & Julien S. Murphy - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):35-56.
    In two recent works, Intellectuals and Power and General Theory of Victims, François Laruelle offers a critique of the public intellectual, including Jean-Paul Sartre, claiming such intellectuals have a disregard for victims of crimes against humanity. Laruelle insists that the victim has been left out of philosophy and displaced by an abstract pursuit of justice. He offers a non- philosophical approach that reverses the victim/intellectual dyad and calls for compassionate insurrection. In this paper, we probe Laruelle's critique of the committed (...)
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  9.  11
    La "fête mobile" de la non-philosophie.Yvanka B. Raynova - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):5-13.
    The editorial aims to unveil the attracting force of Laruelle's non-philosophy for scholars from different disciplines and artists. It shows how a new "democratic order of thinking" permits non-philosophy to enclose domains that have long been considered as opposites: philosophy, science, religion and the arts. Conceived as parameters of thought of the same right and without privileges, these variables can be superposed in a process of creative invention. The performative force of non-standard thinking, which can take different forms of philo-fiction, (...)
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  10.  31
    Harmonizing Voices: François Laruelle and Anthony Paul Smith.Anthony Paul Smith & Mark William Westmoreland - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (2):22-34.
    The following interview of Mark William Westmoreland with Anthony Paul Smith–well-known scholar and translator of François Laruelle –considers both implications and extensions of Laruelle's non-philosophy for contemporary thought. Smith has helped bring about a surge of interest in Laruelle due to his many translations of his texts as well as being the author or co-editor of several books on Laruelle. Discussed are in particular the difficulties and joys of translating and the usefulness of Laruelle's thought for Smith's own work, especially (...)
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  11.  4
    "Scum of the Earth": Patočka, Atonement, and Waste.Jason Alvis - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):71-88.
    Sacrifice, solidarity, and social decadence were essential themes not only for Patočka's philosophical work, but also for his personal life. In the "Varna Lectures" sacrifice is characterized uniquely as the privation of a clear telos, as counter-escapist, and as sutured to a comportment of finite life that is non-causal and non-purposive. In his Heretical Essays a similar hope is expressed to extract meaningfulness from use-value, and to deploy a Socratic and Christian "Care for the Soul" that can counteract the decadences (...)
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  12.  22
    Zerstreuung, Verschließung, Hingabe. Zur Figur des Transzendierens Bei Jan Patočka.Jan Frei - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):48-70.
    To get distracted, to enclose and to give oneself. The Gesture of Transcendence in Jan Patočka The problem of transcendence can be traced throughout the whole work of Jan Patočka. The appeal to transcend our bonds to mere objectivity is a constant issue of his thought. It finds a new substantiation in the 1960s in his studies focusing on the meaning of the other as human being. The relation to the other person offers a special "occasion" or "place" of transcendence (...)
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  13.  6
    The Experiment of Night: Jan Patočka on War, and a Christianity to Come.Martin Kočí - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):107-124.
    Sacrifice, solidarity, and social decadence were essential themes not only for Patočka's philosophical work, but also for his personal life. In the "Varna Lectures" sacrifice is characterized uniquely as the privation of a clear telos, as counter-escapist, and as sutured to a comportment of finite life that is non-causal and non-purposive. In his Heretical Essays a similar hope is expressed to extract meaningfulness from use-value, and to deploy a Socratic and Christian "Care for the Soul" that can counteract the decadences (...)
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  14.  9
    Philosophy as Capitalism and the Socialist Radically Metaphysical Response to It.Katerina Kolozova - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1).
    The author starts from the thesis that there is no such thing as a "natural" or "apolitical" economy. The economy is always already political, as it is the economy’s material core of power, control, and its main mechanisms, i.e. exploitation and oppression. It is no less so in the era of neoliberalism, a time in which we witness the divorce between capitalism and democracy. In order to lay the foundations of a different economy, one that is not based on wage (...)
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  15.  29
    Jan Patočka's Reversal of Dostoevsky and Charter 77.Jozef Majernik - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):12-31.
    Jan Patočka became politically active for the first time as a spokesperson of the dissident movement Charter 77. In this capacity he wrote several essays, the first of which, entitled "On the Matters of The Plastic People of the Universe and DG 307", I interpret as the explanation and justification of his turn toward political engagement. The following article is a reading of Patočka's essay that pays particular attention to a peculiar formal feature of the essay – namely that it's (...)
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  16.  3
    Patočka, the Meaning of the Post-European Spirit and its Direction.Philippe Merlier - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):125-134.
    The Europe that was born from Plato's "care for the soul" can today no longer be recognized; it has been replaced by the self-management of the economic EU. How can we now come back to a Europe concerned about its soul, the others, and the world, reinventing itself as a new nation? Jan Patočka's thoughts on post-Europe can show us the way. Starting from some clarifications on the definitely European initial meaning that Patočka detects in Socrates' "care for the soul", (...)
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  17.  21
    Jan Assmann: Totale Religion. Ursprünge und Formen puritanischer Verschärfung.Susanne Moser - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):146-154.
    A book review of Jan Assman's book on Total Religion.
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  18.  12
    Patočka ist gestorben. Wir müssen etwas tun!Klaus Nellen & Jakub Homolka - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):135-145.
    An Interview with Klaus Nellen by Jakub Homolka about the rescued manuscripts of Jan Patočka and the establishment of the Patočka archive at the Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna.
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  19.  7
    On the Matters of The Plastic People of the Universe and DG 307.Jan Patočka - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):9-11.
    An essay of Jan Patočka on Dostoevsky's short story "The Dream of a Ridiculous Man".
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  20.  9
    Subjectivité et projet. La critique patočkienne du concept heideggérien de "projet de possibilités".Ovidiu Stanciu - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):32-47.
    Subjectivity and Project. Patočka's critique of Heidegger's concept "project of possibilities" The purpose of this article is to lay out the way the main aspects of Patočka's critical reading of Heidegger's fundamental ontology. More precisely, I intend to restate the central arguments Patočka raised against Heidegger's characterization of "understanding" as a "project". In the first part, I will single out Patočka's project of an "asubjective phenomenology" by distinguishing it from another asubjective project and from the subjective phenomenology. In the second (...)
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  21.  25
    Max Scheler and Jan Patočka on the First World War.Christian9 Sternad - 2017 - Labyrinth 19 (1):89-106.
    The First World War was both an historical and a philosophical event. Philosophers engaged in what Kurt Flasch aptly called "the spiritual mobilization" of philosophy. Max Scheler was particularly important among these "war philosophers", given that he was the one who penned some of the most influential philosophical writings of the First World War, among them Der Genius des Krieges und der Deutsche Krieg. As I aim to show, Max Scheler's war writings were crucial for Jan Patočka's interpretation of the (...)
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