Year:

  1.  10
    Exploring the Relationship Between Gamma-Band Activity and Maths Anxiety.Michael Batashvili, Paul A. Staples, Ian Baker & David Sheffield - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1616-1626.
    ABSTRACTPrevious research has outlined high anxiety in connection with gamma modulation, identifying that gamma-band activity correlates with processing of threat perception, attention...
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  2.  4
    The Effect of Rumination on Recall of Emotional Words: Comparison of Dysphoric Individuals with and Without a History of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury.Konrad Bresin, Kristen Mccowan & Edelyn Verona - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1655-1671.
    ABSTRACTPrior research and theory has suggested that rumination plays a role in nonsuicidal self-injury, and rumination increases recall of negative autobiographical information in dysphoric...
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  3.  8
    Reduced Associative Memory for Negative Information: Impact of Confidence and Interactive Imagery During Study.Jeremy B. Caplan, Tobias Sommer, Christopher R. Madan & Esther Fujiwara - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1745-1753.
    ABSTRACTAlthough item-memory for emotional information is enhanced, memory for associations between items is often impaired for negative, emotionally arousing compared to neutral information. We te...
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  4.  11
    From Face to Face: The Contribution of Facial Mimicry to Cognitive and Emotional Empathy.Hanna Drimalla, Niels Landwehr, Ursula Hess & Isabel Dziobek - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1672-1686.
    ABSTRACTDespite advances in the conceptualisation of facial mimicry, its role in the processing of social information is a matter of debate. In the present study, we investigated the relationship b...
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  5.  13
    Echoing the Emotions of Others: Empathy is Related to How Adults and Children Map Emotion Onto the Body.Matthew E. Sachs, Jonas Kaplan & Assal Habibi - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1639-1654.
    ABSTRACTEmpathy involves a mapping between the emotions observed in others and those experienced in one’s self. However, effective social functioning also requires an ability to differentiate one’s...
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  6.  9
    Oh, the Things You Don’T Know: Awe Promotes Awareness of Knowledge Gaps and Science Interest.Jonathon McPhetres - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1599-1615.
    ABSTRACTAwe is described as an a “epistemic emotion” because it is hypothesised to make gaps in one’s knowledge salient. However, no empirical evidence for this yet exists. Awe is also hypothesised...
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  7.  12
    Mindfulness and Negative Affectivity in Real Time: A Within-Person Process Model.Malek Mneimne, Samantha Dashineau & K. Lira Yoon - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1687-1701.
    ABSTRACTTo extend our understanding of the proximal etiology of personality pathology, this study examined the dynamic, in-the-moment relations between mindfulness and negative affectivity (NA; emo...
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  8.  8
    When More is Not Merrier: Shared Stressful Experiences Amplify.Sasha Nahleen, Georgia Dornin & Melanie K. T. Takarangi - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1718-1725.
    ABSTRACTSharing experiences with others, even without communication, can amplify those experiences. We investigated whether shared stressful experiences amplify. Participants completed the Cold Pre...
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  9.  5
    The Relation Between Emotion Regulation Choice and Posttraumatic Growth.Ana I. Orejuela-Dávila, Sara M. Levens, Sara J. Sagui-Henson, Richard G. Tedeschi & Gal Sheppes - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1709-1717.
    ABSTRACTPrevious research has examined emotion regulation and trauma in the context of psychopathology, yet little research has examined ER in posttraumatic growth, the experience of pos...
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  10.  10
    Divergent Effects of Instructed and Reported Emotion Regulation Strategies on Children’s Memory for Emotional Information.Parisa Parsafar & Elizabeth L. Davis - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1726-1735.
    ABSTRACTDistraction can reduce adults’ memory for emotion-eliciting information, whereas reappraisal can preserve or enhance it. Yet, when given instructions to use specific emotion regulation...
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  11.  5
    Stop Crying! The Impact of Situational Demands on Interpersonal Emotion Regulation.Lisanne S. Pauw, Disa A. Sauter, Gerben A. Van Kleef & Agneta H. Fischer - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1587-1598.
    ABSTRACTCrying is a common response to emotional distress that elicits support from the environment. People may regulate another’s crying in several ways, such as by providing socio-affective suppo...
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  12.  9
    Spatial Location and Emotion Modulate Voice Perception.Ana P. Pinheiro, Diogo Lima, Pedro B. Albuquerque, Andrey Anikin & César F. Lima - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1577-1586.
    ABSTRACTHow do we perceive voices coming from different spatial locations, and how is this affected by emotion? The current study probed the interplay between space and emotion during voice percept...
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  13.  7
    You Are My Happiness: Socially Enriched Happiness Belief Predicts Life Satisfaction, Especially Among the Poor.Ji-eun Shin - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1702-1708.
    ABSTRACTWhat three words come to your mind in response to “happiness”? Using a free-association task [cf. Nelson, D. L., McEvoy, C. L., & Dennis, S.. What is free association and what does i...
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  14.  11
    Awe or Horror: Differentiating Two Emotional Responses to Schema Incongruence.Pamela Marie Taylor & Yukiko Uchida - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1548-1561.
    ABSTRACTExperiences that contradict one's core concepts elicit intense emotions. Such schema incongruence can elicit awe, wherein experiences that are too vast...
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  15.  8
    Predicting Early Emotion Knowledge Development Among Children of Colour Living in Historically Disinvested Neighbourhoods: Consideration of Child Pre-Academic Abilities, Self-Regulation, Peer Relations and Parental Education.Alexandra Ursache, Spring Dawson-McClure, Jessica Siegel & Laurie Miller Brotman - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1562-1576.
    ABSTRACTEmotion knowledge, the ability to accurately perceive and label emotions, predicts higher quality peer relations, higher social competence, higher academic achievement, and fewer behaviour...
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  16.  5
    Validating the Radboud Faces Database From a Child’s Perspective.Iris A. M. Verpaalen, Geraly Bijsterbosch, Lynn Mobach, Gijsbert Bijlstra, Mike Rinck & Anke M. Klein - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1531-1547.
    ABSTRACTFacial expressions play a central role in diverse areas of psychology. However, facial stimuli are often only validated by adults, and there are no face databases validated by school-aged c...
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  17.  12
    Change in Gaze-Based Attention Bias in Adolescents with Social Anxiety Disorder.Susan W. White, Nicole N. Capriola-Hall, Andrea Trubanova Wieckowski & Thomas H. Ollendick - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1736-1744.
    ABSTRACTAlthough attention bias toward threat has been associated with Social Anxiety Disorder, concerns regarding the ability of current measures to detect change in AB following treatm...
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  18.  6
    Does It Help to Feel Your Body? Evidence is Inconclusive That Interoceptive Accuracy and Sensibility Help Cope with Negative Experiences.Giorgia Zamariola, Olivier Luminet, Adrien Mierop & Olivier Corneille - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1627-1638.
    ABSTRACTIn four studies, we examined the moderating impact of Interoceptive Accuracy and Interoceptive Sensibility (IS, ass...
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  19.  11
    Cognitive Engagement in Emotional Text Reading: Concurrent Recordings of Eye Movements and Head Motion.Ugo Ballenghein, Olga Megalakaki & Thierry Baccino - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1448-1460.
    ABSTRACTThe present study examined the effects of emotions on eye movements, head motion, and iPad motion during reading. Thirty-one participants read neutral, emotionally negative texts and emotio...
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  20.  9
    Delayed Reconfiguration of a Non-Emotional Task Set Through Reactivation of an Emotional Task Set in Task Switching: An Ageing Study.Natalie Berger, Anne Richards & Eddy J. Davelaar - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1370-1386.
    ABSTRACTIn our everyday life, we frequently switch between different tasks, a faculty that changes with age. However, it is still not understood how emotion impacts on age-related changes in task s...
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  21.  11
    Knowing Me, Knowing You: Emotion Differentiation in Oneself is Associated with Recognition of Others’ Emotions.Jacob Israelashvili, Suzanne Oosterwijk, Disa Sauter & Agneta Fischer - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1461-1471.
    ABSTRACTPrevious research has found that individuals vary greatly in emotion differentiation, that is, the extent to which they distinguish between different emotions when reporting on their own fe...
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  22.  6
    Semantic and Affective Manifestations of Ambi.Oksana Itkes, Zohar Eviatar & Assaf Kron - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1356-1369.
    ABSTRACTPeople sometimes report both pleasant and unpleasant feelings when presented with affective stimuli. However, what is reported as “mixed emotions” might reflect semantic knowledge about the...
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  23.  5
    The Influence of Pre-Training Evaluative Responses on Approach-Avoidance Training Outcomes.Anand Krishna & Andreas B. Eder - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1410-1423.
    ABSTRACTApproach-avoidance training has been shown to be effective in both clinical and laboratory research. However, some studies have failed to show the effects of AAT. Therefore, finding m...
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  24.  12
    Targeting Avoidance Via Compound Extinction.Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos & Iris M. Engelhard - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1523-1530.
    ABSTRACTAvoidance towards innocuous cues is a key diagnostic criterion across anxiety-related disorders. Importantly, the most effective intervention for anxiety-related disorders, exposure therapy with response prevention, sometimes does not prevent the relapse of anxiety's symptomatology. We tested whether extinction effects, the experimental proxy of exposure, are enhanced by increasing the discrepancy between the prediction of an unpleasant event happening, and the actual event. Forty-eight individuals first saw pictures of three stimuli. Two pictures were followed by a shock and one was not. (...)
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  25.  10
    Being Moved by Meaningfulness: Appraisals of Surpassing Internal Standards Elicit Being Moved by Relationships and Achievements.Helen Landmann, Florian Cova & Ursula Hess - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1387-1409.
    ABSTRACTPeople can be moved and overwhelmed, a phenomenon typically accompanied by goose-bumps and tears. We argue that these feelings of being moved are not limited to situations that are appraise...
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  26.  9
    The Impact of Emotional Faces on Younger and Older Adults’ Attentional Blink.Allison M. Sklenar & Andrew Mienaltowski - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1436-1447.
    ABSTRACTThe attentional blink is the impaired ability to detect a second target when it follows shortly after the first among distractors in a rapid serial visual presentation...
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  27.  7
    State Emotional Clarity and Attention to Emotion: A Naturalistic Examination of Their Associations with Each Other, Affect, and Context.Renee J. Thompson & Matthew Tyler Boden - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1514-1522.
    ABSTRACTDespite emotional clarity and attention to emotion being dynamic in nature, research has largely focused on their trait forms. We examined the association between state and trait forms of t...
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  28.  13
    It Was Intuitive, and It Felt Good: A Daily Diary Study on How People Feel When Making Decisions.Thea Zander-Schellenberg, Carina Remmers, Johannes Zimmermann, Stefan Thommen & Roselind Lieb - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1505-1513.
    ABSTRACTIn daily life, people make plenty of decisions, either intuitively or based on analysis. So far, research has examined when decision-making leads to correct or biased outcomes. In the prese...
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  29.  8
    Facial Expressions Can Inhibit the Activation of Gender Stereotypes.Xiaobin Zhang, Qiong Li, Shan Sun & Bin Zuo - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1424-1435.
    ABSTRACTUsing faces as the priming stimuli, the present study explored the influence of facial expressions on the activation of gender stereotypes using a lexical decision paradigm. Experiment 1 explored the activation of gender stereotypes when the facial primes contained only gender information. The results showed that gender stereotypes were activated. In Experiment 2, the facial primes contained both gender category and expression information. The results indicated that gender stereotypes were not activated. Experiment 3 required the participants to make emotion, gender, (...)
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  30.  7
    “Passion” Versus “Patience”: The Effects of Valence and Arousal on Constructive Word Recognition.Anne Kever, Delphine Grynberg, Arnaud Szmalec, Eleonore Smalle & Nicolas Vermeulen - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (6):1302-1309.
    ABSTRACTAccumulating evidence suggests that emotional information is often recognised faster than neutral information. Several studies examined the effects of valence and arousal on word recognition, but yielded partially diverging results. Here, we used two alternative versions of a constructive recognition paradigm in which a target word is hidden by a visual mask that gradually disappears, to investigate whether the emotional properties of words influence their speed of recognition. Participants were instructed either to classify the incrementally appearing word as emotional or (...)
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  31.  11
    Many Moral Buttons or Just One? Evidence From Emotional Facial Expressions.Laura Franchin, Janet Geipel, Constantinos Hadjichristidis & Luca Surian - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):943-958.
    ABSTRACTWe investigated whether moral violations involving harm selectively elicit anger, whereas purity violations selectively elicit disgust, as predicted by the Moral Foundations Theory. We analysed participants’ spontaneous facial expressions as they listened to scenarios depicting moral violations of harm and purity. As predicted by MFT, anger reactions were elicited more frequently by harmful than by impure actions. However, violations of purity elicited more smiling reactions and expressions of anger than of disgust. This effect was found both in a classic set (...)
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  32.  4
    Attention to Faces and Gaze-Following in Social Anxiety: Preliminary Evidence From a Naturalistic Eye-Tracking Investigation.Nicola J. Gregory, Helen Bolderston & Jastine V. Antolin - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):931-942.
    ABSTRACTSocial attentional biases are a core component of social anxiety disorder, but research has not yet determined their direction due to methodological limitations. Here we present preliminary findings from a novel, dynamic eye-tracking paradigm allowing spatial–temporal measurement of attention and gaze-following, a mechanism previously unexplored in social anxiety. 105 participants took part, with those high and low in social anxiety traits entered into the analyses. Participants watched a video of an emotionally-neutral social scene, where two actors periodically shifted their gaze (...)
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  33.  7
    A Different Kind of Pain: Affective Valence of Errors and Incongruence.Ivan Ivanchei, Alena Begler, Polina Iamschinina, Margarita Filippova, Maria Kuvaldina & Andrey Chetverikov - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):1051-1058.
    ABSTRACTPeople hiss and swear when they make errors, frown and swear again when they encounter conflicting information. Such error- and conflict-related signs of negative affect are found even when there is no time pressure or external reward and the task itself is very simple. Previous studies, however, provide inconsistent evidence regarding the affective consequences of resolved conflicts, that is, conflicts that resulted in correct responses. We tested whether response accuracy in the Eriksen flanker task will moderate the effect of trial (...)
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  34.  48
    The Impact of Past Behaviour Normality on Regret: Replication and Extension of Three Experiments of the Exceptionality Effect.Lucas Kutscher & Gilad Feldman - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):901-914.
    Norm theory (Kahneman & Miller, 1986) described a tendency for people to associate stronger regret with a negative outcome when it is a result of an exception (abnormal behavior) compared to when it is a result of routine (normal behavior). In two pre-registered studies, we conducted a replication and extension of three classic experiments on past behavior exception/routine contrasts (N = 684). We successfully replicated Kahneman and Miller’s (1986) experiments with the classic hitchhiker-scenario (Part 1) and car accident-scenario (Part 2). (...)
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  35.  9
    Generalisation of Threat Expectancy Increases with Time.Arne Leer, Dieuwke Sevenster & Miriam J. J. Lommen - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):1067-1075.
    ABSTRACTExcessive fear generalisation is a feature characteristic of clinical anxiety and has been linked to its aetiology. Previous animal studies have shown that the mere passage of time increases fear generalisation and that brief exposure to training cues prior to long-term testing reverses this effect. The current study examined these phenomena in humans. Healthy participants learned the relationship between the presentation of a picture of a neutral male face and the delivery of a mild shock. One group was immediately tested (...)
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  36.  8
    Surprise: Unfolding of Facial Expressions.Marret K. Noordewier & Eric van Dijk - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):915-930.
    ABSTRACTResponses to surprising events are dynamic. We argue that initial responses are primarily driven by the unexpectedness of the surprising event and reflect an interrupted and surprised state in which the outcome does not make sense yet. Later responses, after sense-making, are more likely to incorporate the valence of the outcome itself. To identify initial and later responses to surprising stimuli, we conducted two repetition-change studies and coded the general valence of facial expressions using computerised facial coding and specific facial (...)
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  37.  13
    Bypassing the Gatekeeper: Incidental Negative Cues Stimulate Choices with Negative Outcomes.Niek Strohmaier & Harm Veling - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):1059-1066.
    ABSTRACTThe Theory of Event Coding predicts that exposure to affective cues can automatically trigger affectively congruent behaviour due to shared representational codes. An intriguing hypothesis from this theory is that exposure to aversive cues can automatically trigger actions that have previously been learned to result in aversive outcomes. Previous work has indeed found such a compatibility effect on reaction times in forced-choice tasks, but not for action selection in free-choice tasks. Failure to observe this compatibility effect for aversive cues in (...)
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  38.  3
    Memory for Dangers Past: Threat Contexts Produce More Consistent Learning Than Do Non-Threatening Contexts.Akos Szekely, Suparna Rajaram & Aprajita Mohanty - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):1031-1040.
    ABSTRACTIn earlier work we showed that individuals learn the spatial regularities within contexts and use this knowledge to guide detection of threatening targets embedded in these contexts. While it is highly adaptive for humans to use contextual learning to detect threats, it is equally adaptive for individuals to flexibly readjust behaviour when contexts once associated with threatening stimuli begin to be associated with benign stimuli, and vice versa. Here, we presented face targets varying in salience in new or old spatial (...)
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  39.  6
    Reappraising Faces: Effects on Accountability Appraisals, Self-Reported Valence, and Pupil Diameter.Jennifer Yih, Harry Sha, Danielle E. Beam, Josef Parvizi & James J. Gross - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (5):1041-1050.
    ABSTRACTMany of our emotions arise in social contexts, as we interact with and learn about others. What is not yet clear, however, is how such emotions unfold when we either react to others or attempt to regulate our emotions. To address this issue, 30 healthy volunteers reacted to or reappraised positive or negative information that was paired with neutral faces. While they were doing this task, we assessed pupillary responses. We also asked participants to provide ratings of accountability and experienced (...)
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  40.  13
    Toward a Consensual Taxonomy of Emotions.Dacher Keltner - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):14-19.
  41.  15
    Revisiting the Past and Back to the Future: Horizons of Cognition and Emotion Research.Sander L. Koole & Klaus Rothermund - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):1-7.
    ABSTRACTTo commemorate that Cognition & Emotion was established three decades ago, we asked some distinguished scholars to reflect on past research on the interface of cognition and emotion and prospects for the future. The resulting papers form the Special Issue on Horizons in Cognition and Emotion Research. The contributions to Horizons cover both the field in general and a diversity of specific topics, including affective neuroscience, appraisal theory, automatic evaluation, embodied emotion, emotional disorders, emotion-linked attentional bias, emotion recognition, emotion regulation, (...)
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  42.  15
    Does Emotion Influence Visual Perception? Depends on How You Look at It.Paula M. Niedenthal & Adrienne Wood - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):77-84.
  43.  21
    Cognition and Emotion: A Plea for Theory.Rainer Reisenzein - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):109-118.
  44.  18
    Cognition and Emotion: On Paradigms and Metaphors.Dirk Wentura - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):85-93.
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