Year:

  1.  7
    Emotional Capture by Fearful Expressions Varies with Psychopathic Traits.Saz P. Ahmed, Sara Hodsoll, Polly Dalton & Catherine L. Sebastian - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):207-214.
    ABSTRACTTask-irrelevant emotional expressions are known to capture attention, with the extent of “emotional capture” varying with psychopathic traits in antisocial samples. We investigated whether this variation extends throughout the continuum of psychopathic traits in a community sample. Participants searched for a target face among facial distractors. As predicted, angry and fearful faces interfered with search, indicated by slower reaction times relative to neutral faces. When fear appeared as either target or distractor, diminished emotional capture was seen with increasing affective-interpersonal psychopathic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  6
    Correlations of Trait and State Emotions with Utilitarian Moral Judgements.Jonathan Baron, Burcu Gürçay & Mary Frances Luce - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):116-129.
    In four experiments, we asked subjects for judgements about scenarios that pit utilitarian outcomes against deontological moral rules, for example, saving more lives vs. a rule against active killing. We measured trait emotions of anger, disgust, sympathy and empathy, asked about the same emotions after each scenario. We found that utilitarian responding to the scenarios, and higher scores on a utilitarianism scale, were correlated negatively with disgust, positively with anger, positively with specific sympathy and state sympathy, and less so with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  3
    Factors Contributing to Individual Differences in Facial Expression Categorisation.Corinne Green & Kun Guo - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-12.
    Individuals vary in perceptual accuracy when categorising facial expressions, yet it is unclear how these individual differences in non-clinical population are related to cognitive processing stages at facial information acquisition and interpretation. We tested 104 healthy adults in a facial expression categorisation task, and correlated their categorisation accuracy with face-viewing gaze allocation and personal traits assessed with Autism Quotient, anxiety inventory and Self-Monitoring Scale. The gaze allocation had limited but emotion-specific impact on categorising expressions. Specifically, longer gaze at the eyes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    On the Malleability of the Meaning of Contexts: The Influence of Another Person’s Emotion Expressions on Situation Perception.Ursula Hess & Shlomo Hareli - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):185-191.
  5.  2
    Emotional Mimicry of Older Adults’ Expressions: Effects of Partial Inclusion in a Cyberball Paradigm.Isabell Hühnel, Janka Kuszynski, Jens B. Asendorpf & Ursula Hess - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):92-101.
    As intergenerational interactions increase due to an ageing population, the study of emotion-related responses to the elderly is increasingly relevant. Previous research found mixed results regarding affective mimicry – a measure related to liking and affiliation. In the current study, we investigated emotional mimicry to younger and older actors following an encounter with a younger and older player in a Cyberball game. In a complete exclusion condition, in which both younger and older players excluded the participant, we expected emotional mimicry (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  3
    The Role of Motion and Intensity in Deaf Children’s Recognition of Real Human Facial Expressions of Emotion.Anna C. Jones, Roberto Gutierrez & Amanda K. Ludlow - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):102-115.
    ABSTRACTThere is substantial evidence to suggest that deafness is associated with delays in emotion understanding, which has been attributed to delays in language acquisition and opportunities to converse. However, studies addressing the ability to recognise facial expressions of emotion have produced equivocal findings. The two experiments presented here attempt to clarify emotion recognition in deaf children by considering two aspects: the role of motion and the role of intensity in deaf children’s emotion recognition. In Study 1, 26 deaf children were (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Verbal Instructions Targeting Valence Alter Negative Conditional Stimulus Evaluations.Camilla C. Luck & Ottmar V. Lipp - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):61-80.
    Negative conditional stimulus valence acquired during fear conditioning may enhance fear relapse and is difficult to remove as it extinguishes slowly and does not respond to the instruction that unconditional stimulus presentations will cease. We examined whether instructions targeting CS valence would be more effective. In Experiment 1, an image of one person was paired with an aversive US, while another was presented alone. After acquisition, participants were given positive information about the CS+ poser and negative information about the CS− (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  1
    Attentional Networks and Visuospatial Working Memory Capacity in Social Anxiety.Jun Moriya - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):158-166.
  9.  2
    Involuntary Processing of Social Dominance Cues From Bimodal Face-Voice Displays.Virginie Peschard, Pierre Philippot & Eva Gilboa-Schechtman - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-11.
    Social-rank cues communicate social status or social power within and between groups. Information about social-rank is fluently processed in both visual and auditory modalities. So far, the investigation on the processing of social-rank cues has been limited to studies in which information from a single modality was assessed or manipulated. Yet, in everyday communication, multiple information channels are used to express and understand social-rank. We sought to examine the voluntary nature of processing of facial and vocal signals of social-rank using (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  6
    Three Decades of Cognition & Emotion: A Brief Review of Past Highlights and Future Prospects.Klaus Rothermund & Sander L. Koole - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-12.
  11.  3
    Forget About the Future: Effects of Thought Suppression on Memory for Imaginary Emotional Episodes.Nathan A. Ryckman, Donna Rose Addis, Andrew J. Latham & Anthony J. Lambert - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):200-206.
    Whether intentional suppression of an unpleasant or unwanted memory reduces the ability to recall that memory subsequently is a contested issue in contemporary memory research. Building on findings that similar processes are recruited when individuals remember the past and imagine the future, we measured the effects of thought suppression on memory for imagined future scenarios. Thought suppression reduced the ability to recall emotionally negative scenarios, but not those that were emotionally positive. This finding suggests that intentionally avoiding thoughts about emotionally (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  5
    Does a Single Session of Reading Literary Fiction Prime Enhanced Mentalising Performance? Four Replication Experiments of Kidd and Castano.Dalya Samur, Mattie Tops & Sander L. Koole - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):130-144.
    ABSTRACTPrior experiments indicated that reading literary fiction improves mentalising performance relative to reading popular fiction, non-fiction, or not reading. However, the experiments had relatively small sample sizes and hence low statistical power. To address this limitation, the present authors conducted four high-powered replication experiments testing the causal impact of reading literary fiction on mentalising. Relative to the original research, the present experiments used the same literary texts in the reading manipulation; the same mentalising task; and the same kind of participant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  4
    Moment-to-Moment Changes in Feeling Moved Match Changes in Closeness, Tears, Goosebumps, and Warmth: Time Series Analyses.Thomas W. Schubert, Janis H. Zickfeld, Beate Seibt & Alan Page Fiske - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):174-184.
  14.  1
    Discrimination Between Safe and Unsafe Stimuli Mediates the Relationship Between Trait Anxiety and Return of Fear.Lindsay K. Staples-Bradley, Michael Treanor & Michelle G. Craske - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):167-173.
  15.  3
    Of Guns and Snakes: Testing a Modern Threat Superiority Effect.Baptiste Subra, Dominique Muller, Lisa Fourgassie, Alan Chauvin & Theodore Alexopoulos - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):81-91.
    Previous studies suggest that ancient threats capture attention because human beings possess an inborn module shaped by evolution and dedicated to their detection. An alternative account proposes that a key feature predicting whether a stimulus will capture attention is its relevance rather than its ontology. Within this framework, the present research deals with the attentional capture by threats commonly encountered in our urban environment. In two experiments, we investigate the attentional capture by modern threats. In Experiment 1, participants responded to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    Responding to Emotional Scenes: Effects of Response Outcome and Picture Repetition on Reaction Times and the Late Positive Potential.Nina N. Thigpen, Andreas Keil & Alexandra M. Freund - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-13.
    Processing the motivational relevance of a visual scene and reacting accordingly is crucial for survival. Previous work suggests the emotional content of naturalistic scenes affects response speed, such that unpleasant content slows responses whereas pleasant content accelerates responses. It is unclear whether these effects reflect motor-cognitive processes, such as attentional orienting, or vary with the function/outcome of the motor response itself. Four experiments manipulated participants’ ability to terminate the picture and, thereby, the response’s function and motivational value. Attentive orienting was (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Mood Effects on Attentional Control: A Preregistered Replication Study and Critical Analysis.Helen Tibboel - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):145-157.
    In a widely cited paper, Jefferies et al.. Emotional valence and arousal interact in attentional control. Psychological Science, 19, 290–295. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02082.x[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]) report a study in which they manipulated participants’ mood and examined the effects of this manipulation on their performance on the Attentional Blink task. Their results revealed an interaction between emotional valence and arousal: attentional control of participants who experienced a negative mood with low arousal was best, whereas it was worst (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  4
    Does Sunshine Prime Loyal … or Summer? Effects of Associative Relatedness on the Evaluative Priming Effect in the Valent/Neutral Categorisation Task.Benedikt Werner, Elisabeth von Ramin, Adriaan Spruyt & Klaus Rothermund - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):222-230.
    After 30 years of research, the mechanisms underlying the evaluative priming effect are still a topic of debate. In this study, we tested whether the evaluative priming effect can result from associative relatedness rather than evaluative congruency. Stimuli that share the same evaluative connotation are more likely to show some degree of non-evaluative associative relatedness than stimuli that have a different evaluative connotation. Therefore, unless associative relatedness is explicitly controlled for, evaluative priming effects reported in earlier research may be driven (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  6
    Working Memory Capacity and Spontaneous Emotion Regulation in Generalised Anxiety Disorder.K. Lira Yoon, Joelle LeMoult, Atayeh Hamedani & Randi McCabe - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):215-221.
    Researchers have postulated that deficits in cognitive control are associated with, and thus may underlie, the perseverative thinking that characterises generalised anxiety disorder. We examined associations between cognitive control and levels of spontaneous state rumination following a stressor in a sample of healthy control participants and participants with GAD. We assessed cognitive control by measuring working memory capacity, defined as the ability to maintain task-relevant information by ignoring task-irrelevant information. To this end, we used an affective version of the reading (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    Facial Redness, Expression, and Masculinity Influence Perceptions of Anger and Health.Steven G. Young, Christopher A. Thorstenson & Adam D. Pazda - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-12.
    Past research has found that skin colouration, particularly facial redness, influences the perceived health and emotional state of target individuals. In the current work, we explore several extensions of this past research. In Experiment 1, we manipulated facial redness incrementally on neutral and angry faces and had participants rate each face for anger and health. Different red effects emerged, as perceived anger increased in a linear manner as facial redness increased. Health ratings instead showed a curvilinear trend, as both extreme (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  3
    A Minimal Ingroup Advantage in Emotion Identification Confidence.Steven G. Young & John Paul Wilson - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):192-199.
 Previous issues
  
Next issues