Year:

  1.  1
    Fearing Shades of Grey: Individual Differences in Fear Responding Towards Generalisation Stimuli.Inna Arnaudova, Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos, Marieke Effting, Merel Kindt & Tom Beckers - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7).
    ABSTRACTIndividual differences in fear generalisation have been proposed to play a role in the aetiology and/or maintenance of anxiety disorders, but few data are available to directly support that claim. The research that is available has focused mostly on generalisation of peripheral and central physiological fear responses. Far less is known about the generalisation of avoidance, the behavioural component of fear. In two experiments, we evaluated how neuroticism, a known vulnerability factor for anxiety, modulates an array of fear responses, including (...)
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  2. The Association Between Ruminative Thinking and Negative Interpretation Bias in Social Anxiety.Marcel Badra, Lars Schulze, Eni S. Becker, Janna Nonja Vrijsen, Babette Renneberg & Ulrike Zetsche - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1234-1242.
    Cognitive models propose that both, negative interpretations of ambiguous social situations and ruminative thoughts about social events contribute to the maintenance of social anxiety disorder. It has further been postulated that ruminative thoughts fuel biased negative interpretations, however, evidence is rare. The present study used a multi-method approach to assess ruminative processing following a social interaction and negative interpretation bias in a student sample screened for high and low social anxiety. Results support the hypothesis that group differences in negative interpretations (...)
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  3. The Effect of Induced Sadness and Moderate Depression on Attention Networks.Lauren Bellaera & Adrian von Mühlenen - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1140-1152.
    This study investigates how sadness and minor/moderate depression influences the three functions of attention: alerting, orienting, and executive control using the Attention Network Test. The aim of the study is to investigate whether minor-to-moderate depression is more similar to sadness or clinical depression with regard to attentional processing. It was predicted that both induced sadness and minor-to-moderate depression will influence executive control by narrowing spatial attention and in turn this will lead to less interference from the flanker items due to (...)
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  4. Skin-Transmitted Pathogens and the Heebie Jeebies: Evidence for a Subclass of Disgust Stimuli That Evoke a Qualitatively Unique Emotional Response.Khandis R. Blake, Jennifer Yih, Kun Zhao, Billy Sung & Cindy Harmon-Jones - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1153-1168.
    Skin-transmitted pathogens have threatened humans since ancient times. We investigated whether skin-transmitted pathogens were a subclass of disgust stimuli that evoked an emotional response that was related to, but distinct from, disgust and fear. We labelled this response “the heebie jeebies”. In Study 1, coding of 76 participants’ experiences of disgust, fear, and the heebie jeebies showed that the heebie jeebies was elicited by unique stimuli which produced skin-crawling sensations and an urge to protect the skin. In Experiment 2,350 participants’ (...)
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  5. Affect in the Eyes: Explicit and Implicit Evaluations.Tingji Chen, Terhi M. Helminen & Jari K. Hietanen - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1070-1082.
    The present study investigated whether another individual’s gaze direction influences an observer’s affective responses. In Experiment 1, subjective self-ratings and an affective priming paradigm were employed to examine how participants explicitly and implicitly, respectively, evaluated the affective valence of direct gaze, averted gaze, and closed eyes. The explicit self-ratings showed that participants evaluated closed eyes more positively than direct gaze. However, the implicit priming task showed an inverse pattern of results indicating that direct gaze was automatically evaluated more positively than (...)
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  6.  4
    Mindful Attention Predicts Greater Recovery From Negative Emotions, but Not Reduced Reactivity.Sinhae Cho, Hyejeen Lee, Kyung Ja Oh & José A. Soto - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7).
    This study investigated the role of dispositional mindful attention in immediate reactivity to, and subsequent recovery from, laboratory-induced negative emotion. One hundred and fourteen undergraduates viewed blocks of negative pictures followed by neutral pictures. Participants’ emotional responses to negative pictures and subsequent neutral pictures were assessed via self-reported ratings. Participants’ emotional response to negative pictures was used to index level of emotional reactivity to unpleasant stimuli; emotional response to neutral pictures presented immediately after the negative pictures was used to index (...)
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  7.  1
    The Relationship Between Momentary Emotions and Well-Being Across European Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans.Eunsoo Choi & Yulia E. Chentsova-Dutton - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1277-1285.
    Cultural differences in the emphasis on positive and negative emotions suggest that the impact of these emotions on well-being may differ across cultural contexts. The present study utilised a momentary sampling method to capture average momentary emotional experiences. We found that for participants from cultural contexts that foster positive emotions, average momentary positive emotions predicted well-being better than average momentary negative emotions. In contrast, average momentary negative emotions were more strongly associated with well-being measures for Asian Americans, the group from (...)
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  8. Anticipatory Affect During Action Preparation: Evidence From Backward Compatibility in Dual-Task Performance.Andreas B. Eder, Roland Pfister, David Dignath & Bernhard Hommel - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1211-1224.
    Upcoming responses in the second of two subsequently performed tasks can speed up compatible responses in the temporally preceding first task. Two experiments extend previous demonstration of such backward compatibility to affective features: responses to affective stimuli were faster in Task 1 when an affectively compatible response effect was anticipated for Task 2. This emotional backward-compatibility effect demonstrates that representations of the affective consequences of the Task 2 response were activated before the selection of a response in Task 1 was (...)
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  9. Retrieval of Past and Future Positive and Negative Autobiographical Experiences.Elvira García-Bajos & Malen Migueles - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1260-1267.
    We studied retrieval-induced forgetting for past or future autobiographical experiences. In the study phase, participants were given cues to remember past autobiographical experiences or to think about experiences that may occur in the future. In both conditions, half of the experiences were positive and half negative. In the retrieval-practice phase, for past and future experiences, participants retrieved either half of the positive or negative experiences using cued recall, or capitals of the world. Retrieval practice produced recall facilitation and enhanced memory (...)
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  10.  1
    Successful Emotion Regulation Requires Both Conviction and Skill: Beliefs About the Controllability of Emotions, Reappraisal, and Regulation Success.Tony Gutentag, Eran Halperin, Roni Porat, Yochanan E. Bigman & Maya Tamir - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1225-1233.
    To succeed in self-regulation, people need to believe that it is possible to change behaviour and they also need to use effective means to enable such a change. We propose that this also applies to emotion regulation. In two studies, we found that people were most successful in emotion regulation, the more they believed emotions can be controlled and the more they used an effective emotion regulation strategy – namely, cognitive reappraisal. Cognitive reappraisal moderated the link between beliefs about the (...)
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  11.  1
    What Elicits Third-Party Anger? The Effects of Moral Violation and Others’ Outcome on Anger and Compassion.Helen Landmann & Ursula Hess - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1097-1111.
    People often get angry when they perceive an injustice that affects others but not themselves. In two studies, we investigated the elicitation of third-party anger by varying moral violation and others’ outcome presented in newspaper articles. We found that anger was highly contingent on the moral violation. Others’ outcome, although relevant for compassion, were not significantly relevant for anger or less relevant for anger than for compassion. This indicates that people can be morally outraged: anger can be elicited by a (...)
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  12. Emotional Influences on Perception and Working Memory.Juyoen Hur, Alexandru D. Iordan, Florin Dolcos & Howard Berenbaum - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1294-1302.
    Although there has been steady progress elucidating the influence of emotion on cognition, it remains unclear precisely when and why emotion impairs or facilitates cognition. The present study investigated the mechanisms involved in the influence of emotion on perception and working memory, using modified 0-back and 2-back tasks, respectively. First, results showed that attentional focus modulated the impact of emotion on perception. Specifically, emotion facilitated perceptual task performance when it was relevant to the task, but it impaired performance when it (...)
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  13. When Congruence Breeds Preference: The Influence of Selective Attention Processes on Evaluative Conditioning.Katarina Blask, Eva Walther & Christian Frings - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1127-1139.
    We investigated in two experiments whether selective attention processes modulate evaluative conditioning. Based on the fact that the typical stimuli in an EC paradigm involve an affect-laden unconditioned stimulus and a neutral conditioned stimulus, we started from the assumption that learning might depend in part upon selective attention to the US. Attention to the US was manipulated by including a variant of the Eriksen flanker task in the EC paradigm. Similarly to the original Flanker paradigm, we implemented a target-distracter logic (...)
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  14.  1
    The English Word Disgust has No Exact Translation in Hindi or Malayalam.Dolichan Kollareth & James A. Russell - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1169-1180.
    Do different languages have a translation for the English word disgust that labels the same underlying concept? If not, the English word might label a culture-specific concept. Four studies compared disgust to its common translation in Hindi and in Malayalam by examining two components of the concept thought of as a script: causal antecedent and facial expression. The English word was used to refer to reactions to both unclean substances and moral violations; Hindi and Malayalam translations referred mainly to moral (...)
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  15. The Two Sides of Adversity: The Effect of Distant Versus Recent Adversity on Updating Emotional Content in Working Memory.Sara M. Levens, Laura Marie Armstrong, Ana I. Orejuela-Dávila & Tabitha Alverio - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1243-1251.
    Previous research suggests that adversity can have both adaptive and maladaptive effects, yet the emotional and working memory processes that contribute to more or less adaptive outcomes are unclear. The present study sought to investigate how updating emotional content differs in adolescents who have experienced past, recent, or no adversity. Participants who had experienced distant adversity, no adversity, or recent adversity only performed an emotion n-back task with emotional facial expressions. Results revealed that the distant adversity group exhibited significantly faster (...)
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  16.  1
    Associating LIPS and SWOLLEN: Delayed Attentional Disengagement Following Words in Sex Contexts.Suzanne Oosterwijk, Andries R. van der Leij & Mark Rotteveel - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7).
    ABSTRACTWith a series of three studies, using an adapted dot-probe paradigm, we investigated the elicitation of spontaneous affective meaning. Although it is well established that humans show delays in disengaging their attention from conventional affective stimuli, it is unknown whether contextually acquired affective meaning similarly impacts attention. We examined attentional disengagement following pairs of neutral or slightly ambiguous words that in combination could evoke sex, violence or neutral associations. Study 1 demonstrated slower disengagement following words that conveyed sex or violence (...)
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  17.  1
    Measuring Emotions During Epistemic Activities: The Epistemically-Related Emotion Scales.Reinhard Pekrun, Elisabeth Vogl, Krista R. Muis & Gale M. Sinatra - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1268-1276.
    Measurement instruments assessing multiple emotions during epistemic activities are largely lacking. We describe the construction and validation of the Epistemically-Related Emotion Scales, which measure surprise, curiosity, enjoyment, confusion, anxiety, frustration, and boredom occurring during epistemic cognitive activities. The instrument was tested in a multinational study of emotions during learning from conflicting texts. The findings document the reliability, internal validity, and external validity of the instrument. A seven-factor model best fit the data, suggesting that epistemically-related emotions should be conceptualised in terms (...)
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  18. Cognitive Fusion and Emotion Differentiation: Does Getting Entangled with Our Thoughts Dysregulate the Generation, Experience and Regulation of Emotion?Reut Plonsker, Dana Gavish Biran, Ariel Zvielli & Amit Bernstein - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1286-1293.
    We tested whether cognitive fusion impairs emotion differentiation and thereby mediates relations between cognitive fusion and depression and panic symptoms among 55 adults, 50.9% women). Using visual stimuli, we elicited multiple emotion states and measured emotional intensity – the subjective emotion intensity of elicited emotions, as well as emotional differentiation – the degree of co-activation of multiple negative emotions when a specific emotion was elicited. First, as hypothesised, we found that cognitive fusion predicted lower levels of emotion differentiation. In contrast, (...)
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  19. Disappointment Expression Evokes Collective Guilt and Collective Action in Intergroup Conflict: The Moderating Role of Legitimacy Perceptions.Nevin Solak, Michal Reifen Tagar, Smadar Cohen-Chen, Tamar Saguy & Eran Halperin - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1112-1126.
    Research on intergroup emotions has largely focused on the experience of emotions and surprisingly little attention has been given to the expression of emotions. Drawing on the social-functional approach to emotions, we argue that in the context of intergroup conflicts, outgroup members’ expression of disappointment with one’s ingroup induces the complementary emotion of collective guilt and correspondingly a collective action protesting ingroup actions against the outgroup. In Study 1 conducted immediately after the 2014 Gaza war, Jewish-Israeli participants received information about (...)
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  20.  1
    Enhanced Conflict-Driven Cognitive Control by Emotional Arousal, Not by Valence.Qinghong Zeng, Senqing Qi, Miaoyun Li, Shuxia Yao, Cody Ding & Dong Yang - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1083-1096.
    Emotion is widely agreed to have two dimensions, valence and arousal. Few studies have explored the effect of emotion on conflict adaptation by considering both of these, which could have dissociate influence. The present study aimed to fill the gap as to whether emotional valence and arousal would exert dissociable influence on conflict adaptation. In the experiments, we included positive, neutral, and negative conditions, with comparable arousal between positive and negative conditions. Both positive and negative conditions have higher arousal than (...)
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  21.  1
    The Time Course of Attentional Bias to Cues of Threat and Safety.Lisette J. Schmidt, Artem V. Belopolsky & Jan Theeuwes - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (5).
  22.  7
    Counterintuitive Effects of Negative Social Feedback on Attention.Brian A. Anderson - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  23.  5
    Does Anxiety-Linked Attentional Bias to Threatening Information Reflect Bias in the Setting of Attentional Goals, or Bias in the Execution of Attentional Goals?Julian Basanovic & Colin MacLeod - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  24.  4
    Profiles of Emotion Regulation: Understanding Regulatory Patterns and the Implications for Posttraumatic Stress.Samantha A. Chesney & Nakia S. Gordon - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  25.  60
    What's so Funny? Modelling Incongruity in Humour Production.Rachel Hull, Sümeyra Tosun & Jyotsna Vaid - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
    Finding something humorous is intrinsically rewarding and may facilitate emotion regulation, but what creates humour has been underexplored. The present experimental study examined humour generated under controlled conditions with varying social, affective, and cognitive factors. Participants listed five ways in which a set of concept pairs (e.g. MONEY and CHOCOLATE) were similar or different in either a funny way (intentional humour elicitation) or a “catchy” way (incidental humour elicitation). Results showed that more funny responses were produced under the incidental condition, (...)
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  26.  2
    Biased Attention Retraining in Dysphoria: A Failure to Replicate.Liza Mastikhina & Keith Dobson - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  27.  6
    Effects of Self-Relevant Cues and Cue Valence on Autobiographical Memory Specificity in Dysphoria.Noboru Matsumoto & Satoshi Mochizuki - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3):607-615.
  28.  9
    Curiosity and Time: From Not Knowing to Almost Knowing.Marret K. Noordewier & Eric van Dijk - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  29.  3
    Sleep Quality in Healthy and Mood-Disordered Persons Predicts Daily Life Emotional Reactivity.Kimberly O'Leary, Brent J. Small, Vanessa Panaite, Lauren M. Bylsma & Jonathan Rottenberg - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  30.  2
    The Feeling of the Story: Narrating to Regulate Anger and Sadness.Monisha Pasupathi, Cecilia Wainryb, Cade D. Mansfield & Stacia Bourne - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  31.  3
    Adaptive Modes of Rumination: The Role of Subjective Anger.Tamara M. Pfeiler, Mario Wenzel, Hannelore Weber & Thomas Kubiak - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  32.  2
    A Review of Cognitive Biases in Youth Depression: Attention, Interpretation and Memory. [REVIEW]Belinda Platt, Allison M. Waters, Gerd Schulte-Koerne, Lina Engelmann & Elske Salemink - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3):1-22.
  33.  5
    Learning to Fear a Second-Order Stimulus Following Vicarious Learning.Gemma Reynolds, Andy P. Field & Chris Askew - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  34.  1
    Simple Lines and Shapes Are Associated with, and Communicate, Distinct Emotions.Alejandro Salgado-Montejo, Carlos José Salgado, Jorge Alvarado & Charles Spence - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3):511-525.
  35.  3
    Heightened Ruminative Disposition is Associated with Impaired Attentional Disengagement From Negative Relative to Positive Information: Support for the “Impaired Disengagement” Hypothesis.Felicity Southworth, Ben Grafton, Colin MacLeod & Ed Watkins - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  36.  4
    Impact of Induced Joy on Literacy in Children: Does the Nature of the Task Make a Difference?Elise Tornare, Frédérique Cuisinier, Nikolai O. Czajkowski & Francisco Pons - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  37.  2
    Looking Into the Crystal Ball of Our Emotional Lives: Emotion Regulation and the Overestimation of Future Guilt and Shame.Wilco W. van Dijk, Lotte F. van Dillen, Mark Rotteveel & Elise C. Seip - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  38.  3
    Threat Captures Attention but Does Not Affect Learning of Contextual Regularities.Motonori Yamaguchi & Sarah L. Harwood - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  39.  11
    The Effect of Mood on False Memory for Emotional DRM Word Lists.Weiwei Zhang, Julien Gross & Harlene Hayne - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (3).
  40.  2
    Effect of Anxiety on Behavioural Pattern Separation in Humans.Nicholas L. Balderston, Ambika Mathur, Joel Adu-Brimpong, Elizabeth A. Hale, Monique Ernst & Christian Grillon - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  41.  3
    Perceived Social Pressure Not to Experience Negative Emotion is Linked to Selective Attention for Negative Information.Brock Bastian, Madeline Lee Pe & Peter Kuppens - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  42.  5
    Emotional Eating and Pavlovian Learning: Evidence for Conditioned Appetitive Responding to Negative Emotional States.Peggy Bongers & Anita Jansen - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  43.  3
    Habitual Reappraisal in Context: Peer Victimisation Moderates its Association with Physiological Reactivity to Social Stress.Kara A. Christensen, Amelia Aldao, Margaret A. Sheridan & Katie A. McLaughlin - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  44.  4
    Turning Quickly on Myself: Automatic Interpretation Biases in Dysphoria Are Self-Referent.Alexandra H. Cowden Hindash & Jonathan Rottenberg - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  45.  2
    Identification of Emotional Expressiveness in Facial Photographs Over 36 H of Extended Vigilance in Healthy Young Men—a Preliminary Study.Giuliano Emerenciano Ginani, Marcia Pradella-Hallinan & Sabine Pompéia - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  46.  2
    Facial Reactions to Violent and Comedy Films: Association with Callous–Unemotional Traits and Impulsive Aggression.Kostas A. Fanti, Melina Nicole Kyranides & Georgia Panayiotou - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  47.  4
    Fast and Unintentional Evaluation of Emotional Sounds: Evidence From Brief Segment Ratings and the Affective Simon Task.Tímea Folyi & Dirk Wentura - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  48.  2
    Differential Emotion Attribution to Neutral Faces of Own and Other Races.Chao S. Hu, Qiandong Wang, Tong Han, Ethan Weare & Genyue Fu - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  49.  3
    Optimism and Well-Being: A Prospective Multi-Method and Multi-Dimensional Examination of Optimism as a Resilience Factor Following the Occurrence of Stressful Life Events.Evan M. Kleiman, Alexandra M. Chiara, Richard T. Liu, Shari G. Jager-Hyman, Jimmy Y. Choi & Lauren B. Alloy - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  50.  3
    Cortisol and Stimulus-Induced Arousal Level Differentially Impact Memory for Items and Backgrounds.Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz, Arden J. Anderson, Kaci L. Brasher & Thomas S. Brehmer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  51.  2
    The Motivational Properties of Hope in Goal Striving.Rob M. A. Nelissen - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  52.  4
    Anxiety and Retrieval Inhibition: Support for an Enhanced Inhibition Account.Mia Nuñez, Josh Gregory & Richard E. Zinbarg - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  53.  5
    Emotion Regulation of Fear and Disgust: Differential Effects of Reappraisal and Suppression.Bunmi O. Olatunji, Hannah E. Berg & Zidong Zhao - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  54.  2
    Do Infants Discriminate Non-Linguistic Vocal Expressions of Positive Emotions?Melanie Soderstrom, Melissa Reimchen, Disa Sauter & James L. Morgan - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  55.  2
    Development and Validation of an Argentine Set of Facial Expressions of Emotion.Marcelo Vaiman, Mónica Anna Wagner, Estefanía Caicedo & Germán Leandro Pereno - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  56.  3
    Limited Generalisation of Changes in Attentional Bias Following Attentional Bias Modification with the Visual Probe Task.Bram Van Bockstaele, Elske Salemink, Susan M. Bögels & Reinout W. Wiers - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  57.  2
    Lonely Adolescents Exhibit Heightened Sensitivity for Facial Cues of Emotion.Janne Vanhalst, Brandon E. Gibb & Mitchell J. Prinstein - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  58.  13
    Higher Order Influences on Evaluative Priming: Processing Styles Moderate Congruity Effects.Theodore Alexopoulos, Aurore Lemonnier & Klaus Fiedler - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):57-68.
  59.  23
    Effects of Compassionate Thinking on Negative Emotions.Kohki Arimitsu & Stefan G. Hofmann - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):160-167.
  60.  8
    How Does Reward Compete with Goal-Directed and Stimulus-Driven Shifts of Attention?Alexia Bourgeois, Rémi Neveu, Dimitri J. Bayle & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):109-118.
  61.  5
    Depression or Anxiety: Which is Best Able to Predict Patterns of Lateralisation for the Processing of Emotional Faces?Victoria J. Bourne & Matei Vladeanu - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):201-208.
  62.  6
    Heightened Sensitivity to Emotional Expressions in Generalised Anxiety Disorder, Compared to Social Anxiety Disorder, and Controls.Eric Bui, Eric Anderson, Elizabeth M. Goetter, Allison A. Campbell, Laura E. Fischer, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Naomi M. Simon - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):119-126.
  63.  3
    Heightened Sensitivity to Emotional Expressions in Generalised Anxiety Disorder, Compared to Social Anxiety Disorder, and Controls.Eric Bui, Eric Anderson, Elizabeth M. Goetter, Allison A. Campbell, Laura E. Fischer, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Naomi M. Simon - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1).
  64.  6
    Unpleasant Stimuli Differentially Modulate Inhibitory Processes in an Emotional Go/NoGo Task: An Event-Related Potential Study.Giulia Buodo, Michela Sarlo, Giovanni Mento, Simone Messerotti Benvenuti & Daniela Palomba - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):127-138.
  65.  5
    Differential Impact of Emotional Task Relevance on Three Indices of Prioritised Processing for Fearful and Angry Facial Expressions.Haakon G. Engen, Jonathan Smallwood & Tania Singer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):175-184.
  66.  6
    Alternatives to the Fixed-Set Model: A Review of Appraisal Models of Emotion. [REVIEW]Julian W. Fernando, Yoshihisa Kashima & Simon M. Laham - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):19-32.
  67.  2
    Chemosignalling Effects of Human Tears Revisited: Does Exposure to Female Tears Decrease Males’ Perception of Female Sexual Attractiveness?Asmir Gračanin, Marcel A. L. M. van Assen, Višnja Omrčen, Ivana Koraj & Ad J. J. M. Vingerhoets - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):139-150.
  68.  4
    Response to Comment on “Chemosignalling Effects of Human Tears Revisited: Does Exposure to Female Tears Decrease Males’ Perception of Female Sexual Attractiveness?”.Asmir Gračanin, Ad J. J. M. Vingerhoets & Marcel A. L. M. van Assen - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):158-159.
  69.  5
    Washing Away Your Sins Will Set Your Mind Free: Physical Cleansing Modulates the Effect of Threatened Morality on Executive Control.Eyal Kalanthroff, Chen Aslan & Reuven Dar - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):185-192.
  70.  7
    The Effect of Positive Affect on Conflict Resolution: Modulated by Approach-Motivational Intensity.Ya Liu, Zhenhong Wang, Sixiang Quan & Mingjun Li - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):69-82.
  71.  4
    What You See is What You Want to See: Motivationally Relevant Stimuli Can Interrupt Current Resource Allocation.Eugene McSorley & Jayne Morriss - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):168-174.
  72.  9
    Working Memory Affects False Memory Production for Emotional Events.Chiara Mirandola, Enrico Toffalini, Alfonso Ciriello & Cesare Cornoldi - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):33-46.
  73.  7
    Emotion Perception From a Componential Perspective.Vera Shuman, Elizabeth Clark-Polner, Ben Meuleman, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):47-56.
  74.  7
    Categorising Intersectional Targets: An “Either/and” Approach to Race- and Gender-Emotion Congruity.Jacqueline S. Smith, Marianne LaFrance & John F. Dovidio - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):83-97.
  75.  6
    Revisiting the Revisit: Added Evidence for a Social Chemosignal in Human Emotional Tears.Noam Sobel - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):151-157.
  76.  5
    Emotional Variability and Clarity in Depression and Social Anxiety.Renee J. Thompson, Matthew Tyler Boden & Ian H. Gotlib - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):98-108.
  77.  8
    Matching Between Oral Inward–Outward Movements of Object Names and Oral Movements Associated with Denoted Objects.Sascha Topolinski, Lea Boecker, Thorsten M. Erle, Giti Bakhtiari & Diane Pecher - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):3-18.
  78.  10
    Envy and Admiration: Emotion and Motivation Following Upward Social Comparison.Niels van de Ven - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):193-200.
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