Year:

  1.  1
    Information‐Theoretic Properties of Auditory Sequences Dynamically Influence Expectation and Memory.Kat Agres, Samer Abdallah & Marcus Pearce - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    A basic function of cognition is to detect regularities in sensory input to facilitate the prediction and recognition of future events. It has been proposed that these implicit expectations arise from an internal predictive coding model, based on knowledge acquired through processes such as statistical learning, but it is unclear how different types of statistical information affect listeners’ memory for auditory stimuli. We used a combination of behavioral and computational methods to investigate memory for non-linguistic auditory sequences. Participants repeatedly heard (...)
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  2.  2
    Information‐Theoretic Properties of Auditory Sequences Dynamically Influence Expectation and Memory.Kat Agres, Samer Abdallah & Marcus Pearce - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    A basic function of cognition is to detect regularities in sensory input to facilitate the prediction and recognition of future events. It has been proposed that these implicit expectations arise from an internal predictive coding model, based on knowledge acquired through processes such as statistical learning, but it is unclear how different types of statistical information affect listeners’ memory for auditory stimuli. We used a combination of behavioral and computational methods to investigate memory for non-linguistic auditory sequences. Participants repeatedly heard (...)
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  3.  1
    Experimental Philosophy of Explanation Rising: The Case for a Plurality of Concepts of Explanation.Matteo Colombo - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):503-517.
    This paper brings together results from the philosophy and the psychology of explanation to argue that there are multiple concepts of explanation in human psychology. Specifically, it is shown that pluralism about explanation coheres with the multiplicity of models of explanation available in the philosophy of science, and it is supported by evidence from the psychology of explanatory judgment. Focusing on the case of a norm of explanatory power, the paper concludes by responding to the worry that if there is (...)
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  4. Hand Gesture and Mathematics Learning: Lessons From an Avatar.Susan Wagner Cook, Howard S. Friedman, Katherine A. Duggan, Jian Cui & Voicu Popescu - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):518-535.
    A beneficial effect of gesture on learning has been demonstrated in multiple domains, including mathematics, science, and foreign language vocabulary. However, because gesture is known to co-vary with other non-verbal behaviors, including eye gaze and prosody along with face, lip, and body movements, it is possible the beneficial effect of gesture is instead attributable to these other behaviors. We used a computer-generated animated pedagogical agent to control both verbal and non-verbal behavior. Children viewed lessons on mathematical equivalence in which an (...)
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  5.  1
    Introduction to the Special Issue Honoring the 2014 David E. Rumelhart Prize Recipient, Ray Jackendoff.Peter W. Culicover - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
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  6.  1
    Ownership Dilemmas: The Case of Finders Versus Landowners.Peter DeScioli, Rachel Karpoff & Julian De Freitas - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    People sometimes disagree about who owns which objects, and these ownership dilemmas can lead to costly disputes. We investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying people's judgments about finder versus landowner cases, in which a person finds an object on someone else's land. We test psychological hypotheses motivated directly by three major principles that govern these cases in the law. The results show that people are more likely to favor the finder when the object is in a public space compared to a (...)
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  7. Relational Priming Based on a Multiplicative Schema for Whole Numbers and Fractions.Melissa DeWolf, Ji Y. Son, Miriam Bassok & Keith J. Holyoak - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    Why might it be beneficial for adults to process fractions componentially? Recent research has shown that college-educated adults can capitalize on the bipartite structure of the fraction notation, performing more successfully with fractions than with decimals in relational tasks, notably analogical reasoning. This study examined patterns of relational priming for problems with fractions in a task that required arithmetic computations. College students were asked to judge whether or not multiplication equations involving fractions were correct. Some equations served as structurally inverse (...)
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  8. Relational Priming Based on a Multiplicative Schema for Whole Numbers and Fractions.Melissa DeWolf, Ji Y. Son, Miriam Bassok & Keith J. Holyoak - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    Why might it be beneficial for adults to process fractions componentially? Recent research has shown that college-educated adults can capitalize on the bipartite structure of the fraction notation, performing more successfully with fractions than with decimals in relational tasks, notably analogical reasoning. This study examined patterns of relational priming for problems with fractions in a task that required arithmetic computations. College students were asked to judge whether or not multiplication equations involving fractions were correct. Some equations served as structurally inverse (...)
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  9. The Role of Lexical Frequency in the Acceptability of Syntactic Variants: Evidence From That‐Clauses in Polish.Dagmar Divjak - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):354-382.
    A number of studies report that frequency is a poor predictor of acceptability, in particular at the lower end of the frequency spectrum. Because acceptability judgments provide a substantial part of the empirical foundation of dominant linguistic traditions, understanding how acceptability relates to frequency, one of the most robust predictors of human performance, is crucial. The relation between low frequency and acceptability is investigated using corpus- and behavioral data on the distribution of infinitival and finite that-complements in Polish. Polish verbs (...)
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  10. Balancing Effort and Information Transmission During Language Acquisition: Evidence From Word Order and Case Marking.Maryia Fedzechkina, Elissa L. Newport & T. Florian Jaeger - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):416-446.
    Across languages of the world, some grammatical patterns have been argued to be more common than expected by chance. These are sometimes referred to as language universals. One such universal is the correlation between constituent order freedom and the presence of a case system in a language. Here, we explore whether this correlation can be explained by a bias to balance production effort and informativity of cues to grammatical function. Two groups of learners were presented with miniature artificial languages containing (...)
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  11.  1
    Learning the Structure of Social Influence.Samuel J. Gershman, Hillard Thomas Pouncy & Hyowon Gweon - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    We routinely observe others’ choices and use them to guide our own. Whose choices influence us more, and why? Prior work has focused on the effect of perceived similarity between two individuals, such as the degree of overlap in past choices or explicitly recognizable group affiliations. In the real world, however, any dyadic relationship is part of a more complex social structure involving multiple social groups that are not directly observable. Here we suggest that human learners go beyond dyadic similarities (...)
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  12. Perceptual Learning of Intonation Contour Categories in Adults and 9‐ to 11‐Year‐Old Children: Adults Are More Narrow‐Minded. [REVIEW]Vsevolod Kapatsinski, Paul Olejarczuk & Melissa A. Redford - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):383-415.
    We report on rapid perceptual learning of intonation contour categories in adults and 9- to 11-year-old children. Intonation contours are temporally extended patterns, whose perception requires temporal integration and therefore poses significant working memory challenges. Both children and adults form relatively abstract representations of intonation contours: Previously encountered and novel exemplars are categorized together equally often, as long as distance from the prototype is controlled. However, age-related differences in categorization performance also exist. Given the same experience, adults form narrower categories (...)
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  13. Categories of Large Numbers in Line Estimation.Landy David, Charlesworth Arthur & Ottmar Erin - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):326-353.
    How do people stretch their understanding of magnitude from the experiential range to the very large quantities and ranges important in science, geopolitics, and mathematics? This paper empirically evaluates how and whether people make use of numerical categories when estimating relative magnitudes of numbers across many orders of magnitude. We hypothesize that people use scale words—thousand, million, billion—to carve the large number line into categories, stretching linear responses across items within each category. If so, discontinuities in position and response time (...)
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  14.  3
    Multimodal Word Meaning Induction From Minimal Exposure to Natural Text.Lazaridou Angeliki, Marelli Marco & Baroni Marco - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    By the time they reach early adulthood, English speakers are familiar with the meaning of thousands of words. In the last decades, computational simulations known as distributional semantic models have demonstrated that it is possible to induce word meaning representations solely from word co-occurrence statistics extracted from a large amount of text. However, while these models learn in batch mode from large corpora, human word learning proceeds incrementally after minimal exposure to new words. In this study, we run a set (...)
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  15. Further Tests of a Dynamic‐Adjustment Account of Saccade Targeting During the Reading of Chinese.Yanping Liu, Ren Huang, Dingguo Gao & Erik D. Reichle - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    There are two accounts of how readers of unspaced writing systems know where to move their eyes: saccades are directed toward default targets ; or saccade lengths are adjusted dynamically, as a function of ongoing parafoveal processing. This article reports an eye-movement experiment supporting the latter hypothesis by demonstrating that the slope of the relationship between the saccade launch site on word N and the subsequent fixation landing site on word N + 1 is > 1, suggesting that saccades are (...)
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  16. Effects of Manipulation on Attributions of Causation, Free Will, and Moral Responsibility.Dylan Murray & Tania Lombrozo - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):447-481.
    If someone brings about an outcome without intending to, is she causally and morally responsible for it? What if she acts intentionally, but as the result of manipulation by another agent? Previous research has shown that an agent's mental states can affect attributions of causal and moral responsibility to that agent, but little is known about what effect one agent's mental states can have on attributions to another agent. In Experiment 1, we replicate findings that manipulation lowers attributions of responsibility (...)
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  17.  1
    Neuroscientific Prediction and the Intrusion of Intuitive Metaphysics.David Rose, Wesley Buckwalter & Shaun Nichols - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):482-502.
    How might advanced neuroscience—in which perfect neuro-predictions are possible—interact with ordinary judgments of free will? We propose that peoples' intuitive ideas about indeterminist free will are both imported into and intrude into their representation of neuroscientific scenarios and present six experiments demonstrating intrusion and importing effects in the context of scenarios depicting perfect neuro-prediction. In light of our findings, we suggest that the intuitive commitment to indeterminist free will may be resilient in the face of scientific evidence against such free (...)
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  18. Mechanisms of Reference Frame Selection in Spatial Term Use: Computational and Empirical Studies.Holger Schultheis & Laura A. Carlson - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2):276-325.
    Previous studies have shown that multiple reference frames are available and compete for selection during the use of spatial terms such as “above.” However, the mechanisms that underlie the selection process are poorly understood. In the current paper we present two experiments and a comparison of three computational models of selection to shed further light on the nature of reference frame selection. The three models are drawn from different areas of human cognition, and we assess whether they may be applied (...)
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  19.  2
    Metaphorical Accounting: How Framing the Federal Budget Like a Household's Affects Voting Intentions.Paul H. Thibodeau & Stephen J. Flusberg - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    Political discourse is saturated with metaphor, but evidence for the persuasive power of this language has been hard to come by. We addressed this issue by investigating whether voting intentions were affected by implicit mappings suggested by a metaphorically framed message, drawing on a real-world example of political rhetoric about the federal budget. In the first experiment, the federal budget was framed as similar to or different from a household budget, though the information participants received was identical in both conditions. (...)
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  20. Maternal Socioeconomic Status Influences the Range of Expectations During Language Comprehension in Adulthood.Melissa Troyer & Arielle Borovsky - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    In infancy, maternal socioeconomic status is associated with real-time language processing skills, but whether or not this relationship carries into adulthood is unknown. We explored the effects of maternal SES in college-aged adults on eye-tracked, spoken sentence comprehension tasks using the visual world paradigm. When sentences ended in highly plausible, expected target nouns, higher SES was associated with a greater likelihood of considering alternative endings related to the action of the sentence. Moreover, for unexpected sentence endings, individuals from higher SES (...)
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  21.  1
    Cultural Differences in Visual Search for Geometric Figures.Yoshiyuki Ueda, Lei Chen, Jonathon Kopecky, Emily S. Cramer, Ronald A. Rensink, David E. Meyer, Shinobu Kitayama & Jun Saiki - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    While some studies suggest cultural differences in visual processing, others do not, possibly because the complexity of their tasks draws upon high-level factors that could obscure such effects. To control for this, we examined cultural differences in visual search for geometric figures, a relatively simple task for which the underlying mechanisms are reasonably well known. We replicated earlier results showing that North Americans had a reliable search asymmetry for line length: Search for long among short lines was faster than vice (...)
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  22. Functional Equivalence of Sleep Loss and Time on Task Effects in Sustained Attention.Bella Z. Veksler & Glenn Gunzelmann - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    Research on sleep loss and vigilance both focus on declines in cognitive performance, but theoretical accounts have developed largely in parallel in these two areas. In addition, computational instantiations of theoretical accounts are rare. The current work uses computational modeling to explore whether the same mechanisms can account for the effects of both sleep loss and time on task on performance. A classic task used in the sleep deprivation literature, the Psychomotor Vigilance Test, was extended from the typical 10-min duration (...)
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  23. What Am I Looking At? Interpreting Dynamic and Static Gaze Displays.Margot Wermeskerken, Damien Litchfield & Tamara Gog - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    Displays of eye movements may convey information about cognitive processes but require interpretation. We investigated whether participants were able to interpret displays of their own or others' eye movements. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants observed an image under three different viewing instructions. Then they were shown static or dynamic gaze displays and had to judge whether it was their own or someone else's eye movements and what instruction was reflected. Participants were capable of recognizing the instruction reflected in their (...)
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  24. Problem‐Solving Phase Transitions During Team Collaboration.J. Wiltshire Travis, E. Butner Jonathan & M. Fiore Stephen - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    Multiple theories of problem-solving hypothesize that there are distinct qualitative phases exhibited during effective problem-solving. However, limited research has attempted to identify when transitions between phases occur. We integrate theory on collaborative problem-solving with dynamical systems theory suggesting that when a system is undergoing a phase transition it should exhibit a peak in entropy and that entropy levels should also relate to team performance. Communications from 40 teams that collaborated on a complex problem were coded for occurrence of problem-solving processes. (...)
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  25. The Power of 2: How an Apparently Irregular Numeration System Facilitates Mental Arithmetic.Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):158-187.
    Mangarevan traditionally contained two numeration systems: a general one, which was highly regular, decimal, and extraordinarily extensive; and a specific one, which was restricted to specific objects, based on diverging counting units, and interspersed with binary steps. While most of these characteristics are shared by numeration systems in related languages in Oceania, the binary steps are unique. To account for these characteristics, this article draws on—and tries to integrate—insights from anthropology, archeology, linguistics, psychology, and cognitive science more generally. The analysis (...)
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  26.  1
    Automatic Mechanisms for Social Attention Are Culturally Penetrable.Adam S. Cohen, Joni Y. Sasaki, Tamsin C. German & Heejung S. Kim - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):242-258.
    Are mechanisms for social attention influenced by culture? Evidence that social attention is triggered automatically by bottom-up gaze cues and is uninfluenced by top-down verbal instructions may suggest it operates in the same way everywhere. Yet considerations from evolutionary and cultural psychology suggest that specific aspects of one's cultural background may have consequence for the way mechanisms for social attention develop and operate. In more interdependent cultures, the scope of social attention may be broader, focusing on more individuals and relations (...)
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  27.  1
    Modeling Statistical Insensitivity: Sources of Suboptimal Behavior.Annie Gagliardi, Naomi H. Feldman & Jeffrey Lidz - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):188-217.
    Children acquiring languages with noun classes have ample statistical information available that characterizes the distribution of nouns into these classes, but their use of this information to classify novel nouns differs from the predictions made by an optimal Bayesian classifier. We use rational analysis to investigate the hypothesis that children are classifying nouns optimally with respect to a distribution that does not match the surface distribution of statistical features in their input. We propose three ways in which children's apparent statistical (...)
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  28. Phonological Concept Learning.Moreton Elliott, Pater Joe & Pertsova Katya - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):4-69.
    Linguistic and non-linguistic pattern learning have been studied separately, but we argue for a comparative approach. Analogous inductive problems arise in phonological and visual pattern learning. Evidence from three experiments shows that human learners can solve them in analogous ways, and that human performance in both cases can be captured by the same models. We test GMECCS, an implementation of the Configural Cue Model in a Maximum Entropy phonotactic-learning framework with a single free parameter, against the alternative hypothesis that learners (...)
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  29.  2
    Can We Forget What We Know in a False‐Belief Task? An Investigation of the True‐Belief Default.Paula Rubio‐Fernández - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):218-241.
    It has been generally assumed in the Theory of Mind literature of the past 30 years that young children fail standard false-belief tasks because they attribute their own knowledge to the protagonist. Contrary to the traditional view, we have recently proposed that the children's bias is task induced. This alternative view was supported by studies showing that 3 year olds are able to pass a false-belief task that allows them to focus on the protagonist, without drawing their attention to the (...)
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  30.  1
    Language Use and Coalition Formation in Multiparty Negotiations.Eyal Sagi & Daniel Diermeier - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):259-271.
    The alignment of bargaining positions is crucial to a successful negotiation. Prior research has shown that similarity in language use is indicative of the conceptual alignment of interlocutors. We use latent semantic analysis to explore how the similarity of language use between negotiating parties develops over the course of a three-party negotiation. Results show that parties that reach an agreement show a gradual increase in language similarity over the course of the negotiation. Furthermore, reaching the most financially efficient outcome is (...)
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  31. The P600 in Implicit Artificial Grammar Learning.Susana Silva, Vasiliki Folia, Peter Hagoort & Karl Magnus Petersson - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):137-157.
    The suitability of the artificial grammar learning paradigm to capture relevant aspects of the acquisition of linguistic structures has been empirically tested in a number of EEG studies. Some have shown a syntax-related P600 component, but it has not been ruled out that the AGL P600 effect is a response to surface features rather than the underlying syntax structure. Therefore, in this study, we controlled for the surface characteristics of the test sequences and recorded the EEG before and after exposure (...)
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  32.  1
    Language Reflects “Core” Cognition: A New Theory About the Origin of Cross‐Linguistic Regularities.Brent Strickland - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):70-101.
    The underlying structures that are common to the world's languages bear an intriguing connection with early emerging forms of “core knowledge”, which are frequently studied by infant researchers. In particular, grammatical systems often incorporate distinctions that reflect those made in core knowledge. Here, I argue that this connection occurs because non-verbal core knowledge systematically biases processes of language evolution. This account potentially explains a wide range of cross-linguistic grammatical phenomena that currently lack an adequate explanation. Second, I suggest that developmental (...)
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  33.  1
    Spicy Adjectives and Nominal Donkeys: Capturing Semantic Deviance Using Compositionality in Distributional Spaces.Eva M. Vecchi, Marco Marelli, Roberto Zamparelli & Marco Baroni - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):102-136.
    Sophisticated senator and legislative onion. Whether or not you have ever heard of these things, we all have some intuition that one of them makes much less sense than the other. In this paper, we introduce a large dataset of human judgments about novel adjective-noun phrases. We use these data to test an approach to semantic deviance based on phrase representations derived with compositional distributional semantic methods, that is, methods that derive word meanings from contextual information, and approximate phrase meanings (...)
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  34. Highlighting in Early Childhood: Learning Biases Through Attentional Shifting.Joseph M. Burling & Hanako Yoshida - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):96-119.
    The literature on human and animal learning suggests that individuals attend to and act on cues differently based on the order in which they were learned. Recent studies have proposed that one specific type of learning outcome, the highlighting effect, can serve as a framework for understanding a number of early cognitive milestones. However, little is known how this learning effect itself emerges among children, whose memory and attention are much more limited compared to adults. Two experiments were conducted using (...)
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  35.  1
    Not Only Size Matters: Early‐Talker and Late‐Talker Vocabularies Support Different Word‐Learning Biases in Babies and Networks.Eliana Colunga & Clare E. Sims - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):73-95.
    In typical development, word learning goes from slow and laborious to fast and seemingly effortless. Typically developing 2-year-olds seem to intuit the whole range of things in a category from hearing a single instance named—they have word-learning biases. This is not the case for children with relatively small vocabularies. We present a computational model that accounts for the emergence of word-learning biases in children at both ends of the vocabulary spectrum based solely on vocabulary structure. The results of Experiment 1 (...)
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  36.  2
    Does the Body Survive Death? Cultural Variation in Beliefs About Life Everlasting.E. Watson-Jones Rachel, T. A. Busch Justin, L. Harris Paul & H. Legare Cristine - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41.
    Mounting evidence suggests that endorsement of psychological continuity and the afterlife increases with age. This developmental change raises questions about the cognitive biases, social representations, and cultural input that may support afterlife beliefs. To what extent is there similarity versus diversity across cultures in how people reason about what happens after death? The objective of this study was to compare beliefs about the continuation of biological and psychological functions after death in Tanna, Vanuatu, and the United States. Children, adolescents, and (...)
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  37.  1
    Feature Biases in Early Word Learning: Network Distinctiveness Predicts Age of Acquisition.Tomas Engelthaler & Thomas T. Hills - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):120-140.
    Do properties of a word's features influence the order of its acquisition in early word learning? Combining the principles of mutual exclusivity and shape bias, the present work takes a network analysis approach to understanding how feature distinctiveness predicts the order of early word learning. Distance networks were built from nouns with edge lengths computed using various distance measures. Feature distinctiveness was computed as a distance measure, showing how far an object in a network is from other objects based on (...)
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  38.  3
    Developmental Changes in Cross‐Situational Word Learning: The Inverse Effect of Initial Accuracy.Stanka A. Fitneva & Morten H. Christiansen - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):141-161.
    Intuitively, the accuracy of initial word-referent mappings should be positively correlated with the outcome of learning. Yet recent evidence suggests an inverse effect of initial accuracy in adults, whereby greater accuracy of initial mappings is associated with poorer outcomes in a cross-situational learning task. Here, we examine the impact of initial accuracy on 4-year-olds, 10-year-olds, and adults. For half of the participants most word-referent mappings were initially correct and for the other half most mappings were initially incorrect. Initial accuracy was (...)
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  39. Why Are There Developmental Stages in Language Learning? A Developmental Robotics Model of Language Development.Anthony F. Morse & Angelo Cangelosi - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):32-51.
    Most theories of learning would predict a gradual acquisition and refinement of skills as learning progresses, and while some highlight exponential growth, this fails to explain why natural cognitive development typically progresses in stages. Models that do span multiple developmental stages typically have parameters to “switch” between stages. We argue that by taking an embodied view, the interaction between learning mechanisms, the resulting behavior of the agent, and the opportunities for learning that the environment provides can account for the stage-wise (...)
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  40. Going Beyond Input Quantity: Wh‐Questions Matter for Toddlers' Language and Cognitive Development.Meredith L. Rowe, Kathryn A. Leech & Natasha Cabrera - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):162-179.
    There are clear associations between the overall quantity of input children are exposed to and their vocabulary acquisition. However, by uncovering specific features of the input that matter, we can better understand the mechanisms involved in vocabulary learning. We examine whether exposure to wh-questions, a challenging quality of the communicative input, is associated with toddlers' vocabulary and later verbal reasoning skills in a sample of low-income, African-American fathers and their 24-month-old children. Dyads were videotaped in free play sessions at home. (...)
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  41.  1
    Moving Word Learning to a Novel Space: A Dynamic Systems View of Referent Selection and Retention.K. Samuelson Larissa, C. Kucker Sarah & P. Spencer John - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):52-72.
    Theories of cognitive development must address both the issue of how children bring their knowledge to bear on behavior in-the-moment, and how knowledge changes over time. We argue that seeking answers to these questions requires an appreciation of the dynamic nature of the developing system in its full, reciprocal complexity. We illustrate this dynamic complexity with results from two lines of research on early word learning. The first demonstrates how the child's active engagement with objects and people supports referent selection (...)
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  42. Introduction to the Special Issue Honoring the 2013 David E. Rumelhart Prize Recipient Linda B. Smith.Larissa K. Samuelson - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):4-4.
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  43.  2
    Multiple Sensory‐Motor Pathways Lead to Coordinated Visual Attention.Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S1):5-31.
    Joint attention has been extensively studied in the developmental literature because of overwhelming evidence that the ability to socially coordinate visual attention to an object is essential to healthy developmental outcomes, including language learning. The goal of this study was to understand the complex system of sensory-motor behaviors that may underlie the establishment of joint attention between parents and toddlers. In an experimental task, parents and toddlers played together with multiple toys. We objectively measured joint attention—and the sensory-motor behaviors that (...)
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