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  1.  3
    Sense and Sensibility: Testing an Attention‐Based View of Organizational Responses to Social Issues.Luciana Carvalho de Mesquita Ferreira - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):443-456.
    According to attention-based theories, to explain organizational attention is to explain organizational behavior. In our study, we test the model of situated attention and firm behavior by examining the effects of attention structures and allocation of attention on organizational outcomes. We hypothesize a positive relationship between attention structures and the allocation of organizational attention that, in turn, has an effect on financial performance. Using a unique data set composed of indicators of social responsibility published by 338 Brazilian organizations between 2001 (...)
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  2.  2
    Sustainable Banking in Latin American Developing Countries: Leading to Prosperity.Francisco Javier Forcadell & Elisa Aracil - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):382-395.
    This article examines multinational banks’ approaches to corporate social responsibility in developing countries’ subsidiaries, particularly in Latin America. Building on in-depth case studies of two MNBs that are based in Europe and market leaders in Latin America, we analyze their CSR motivations and outcomes in host countries. We examine institutional environments by applying the national business system framework, and we suggest missing categories in its financial and educational dimensions. We theorize how institutional necessity determines MNBs' CSR in developing countries. Finally, (...)
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  3.  1
    Tracing Stakeholder Terminology Then and Now: Convergence and New Pathways.Jennifer J. Griffin - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):326-346.
    Over the past four decades, stakeholder research has united a chorus of voices from different disciplines using different terminology for different audiences all related to a seemingly similar topic: those that affect and are affected by business. By juxtaposing a comprehensive review of the early years of stakeholder research against more recent stakeholder research, we identify areas of common convergence as well as emergent scholarship. We develop an organizing framework consisting of three stakeholder-related themes: who or what is a stakeholder; (...)
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  4.  1
    Investigating Critical Organizational Factors Toward Sustainability Index: Insights From the Taiwanese Electronics Industry.Chia‐Wei Hsu & Dong‐Shang Chang - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):468-479.
    To improve sustainable practices and attract investors, companies in emerging markets have increasingly embraced strategies for inclusion in rapidly expanding sustainability indices. However, most early studies on socially responsible investment or sustainability investment have only focused on exploring the relationship between corporate sustainability and firm value. Moreover, little has been done to explore the practices of emerging market companies for engaging with a sustainability index. To address this research gap, we employed the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory method to identify (...)
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  5.  1
    Caught in a Communicative Catch‐22? Translating the Notion of CSR as Shared Value Creation in a Danish CSR Frontrunner.Høvring Christiane Marie - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):369-381.
    There is a growing interest in how the notion of corporate social responsibility as shared value creation is translated in Scandinavia. However, current research seems to disregard that the specific institutional context is ambiguous, enabling the organization, and its internal stakeholders to translate the institutional logics into contradictory meanings of CSR as shared value creation. Building on the institutional logics perspective and the metaphor of translation, and framed within a case study of a Danish CSR frontrunner, this paper explores how (...)
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  6.  5
    Capturing Advances in CSR: Developed Versus Developing Country Perspectives.Dima Jamali & Archie Carroll - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):321-325.
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  7.  2
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Outcomes: The Role of Country Context.Tay K. McNamara, Rene Carapinha, Marcie Pitt‐Catsouphes, Monique Valcour & Sharon Lobel - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):413-427.
    This study examined the association between employee perceptions of two foci of corporate social responsibility and work attitudes in different countries. Using data collected as part of a multinational research project with a core team in the United States, we found that perceptions of externally focused CSR enactment were positively associated with employee engagement and affective commitment. Perceptions of internally focused CSR enactment were positively associated with affective commitment but not with employee engagement. Analyses across countries revealed more cultural than (...)
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  8.  1
    Stakeholder Theory: A Deliberative Perspective.Ulf Henning Richter & Kevin E. Dow - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):428-442.
    Organizations routinely make choices when addressing conflicting stakes of their stakeholders. As stakeholder theory continues to mature, scholars continue to seek ways to make it more usable, yet proponents continue to debate its legitimacy. Various scholarly attempts to ground stakeholder theory have not narrowed down this debate. We draw from the work of Juergen Habermas to theoretically advance stakeholder theory, and to provide practical examples to illustrate our approach. Specifically, we apply Habermas’ language-pragmatic approach to extend stakeholder theory by advancing (...)
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  9.  2
    An External Perspective on CSR: What Matters and What Does Not?Marina Vashchenko - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):396-412.
    The paper aims at investigating external factors influencing organizational corporate social responsibility -related decision making. Two theoretical perspectives—stakeholder theory and institutional theory—have been applied to compile a list of external factors that might affect a company's CSR choices. As a result, a framework built on the government-related, society-related, and business-related groups of external factors is being suggested. This framework is used in the paper to answer to what extent do different external factors influence CSR-related decisions in large Danish companies and (...)
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  10.  1
    Examining the Win‐Win Proposition of Shared Value Across Contexts: Implications for Future Application.Annika Voltan, Chantal Hervieux & Albert Mills - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):347-368.
    This article examines the concept of creating shared value as articulated by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer, in non-Western and Western contexts. We define non-Western contexts as those in so-called “developing” countries and emerging economies, whereas Western ones pertain to dominant thinking in “developed” regions. We frame our research in postcolonial theory and offer an overview of existing critiques of CSV. We conduct a critical discourse analysis of 66 articles to identify how CSV is being cited by authors, and potential (...)
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  11.  3
    Aligning Responsible Business Practices: A Case Study.Angeli E. Weller - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):457-467.
    This article offers an in-depth case study of a global high tech manufacturer that aligned its ethics and compliance, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability practices. Few large companies organize their responsible business practices this way, despite conceptual relevance and calls to manage them comprehensively. A communities of practice theoretical lens suggests that intentional effort would be needed to bridge meaning between the relevant managers and practices in order to achieve alignment. The findings call attention to the important role played by (...)
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  12.  2
    Assessing Mission Drift at Venture Capital Impact Investors.Dilek Cetindamar & Banu Ozkazanc-Pan - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):257-270.
    In this article, we consider a recent trend whereby private equity available from venture capital firms is being deployed toward mission-driven initiatives in the form of impact investing. Acting as hybrid organizations, these impact investors aim to achieve financial results while also targeting companies and funds to achieve social impact. However, potential mission drift in these VCs, which we define as a decoupling between the investments made and intended aims, might become detrimental to the simultaneous financial and social goals of (...)
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  13.  1
    Corporate Volunteering: A Bibliometric Analysis From 1990 to 2015.Suska Dreesbach‐Bundy & Barbara Scheck - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):240-256.
    This article describes a quantitative examination of corporate volunteering research in the form of a bibliometric analysis. Using author, journal, geography, epistemological, and industry data from 115 refereed and 445 non-refereed publications published during 1990–2015, we identify corporate volunteering as a rather young research field. Although the field has progressively developed, it is still limited in magnitude, with recent signs of stagnation. The current state is characterized by moderate publication and author activity rates, with a shift toward more peer-reviewed publications (...)
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  14.  5
    Business Ethics Searches: A Socioeconomic and Demographic Analysis of U.S. Google Trends in the Context of the 2008 Financial Crisis.Christophe Faugère & Olivier Gergaud - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):271-287.
    A socioeconomic and demographic analysis of U.S. Google Trends for queries about Business Ethics and Greed is proposed in the context of the 2008 financial crisis. The framework is grounded in the ethical decision-making literature. Two models using micro and macro-type variables are tested using GLM and GEE regression techniques. The frequency of these Google queries varies positively with the ratio of females, educational attainment, younger adult age, some measures of economic hardship or inequalities, and the lesser the weight of (...)
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  15.  1
    Green Intentions Under the Blue Flag: Exploring Differences in EU Consumers’ Willingness to Pay More for Environmentally‐Friendly Products.Gregory‐Smith Diana, Manika Danae & Demirel Pelin - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):205-222.
    Recent research on consumer social responsibility highlights the need to examine psychological drivers of environmentally-friendly consumption choices in a global context. This article investigates consumers’ willingness to pay more for environmentally-friendly products across 28 European Union countries, using a sample of 21,514 consumers. A multigroup structural equation modeling analysis reveals significantly different patterns and relationships, in how subjective knowledge about the product's environmental impact, environmental product attitudes, and the perceived importance of the products’ environmental impact influence consumers’ WTP more for (...)
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  16.  3
    When Organizations Are Too Good: Applying Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean to the Corporate Ethical Virtues Model.Muel Kaptein - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):300-311.
    Aristotle's doctrine of the mean states that a virtue is the mean state between two vices: a deficient and an excessive one. The Corporate Ethical Virtues Model defines the mean and the corresponding deficient vice for each of its seven virtues. This paper defines for each of these virtues the corresponding excessive vice and explores why organizations characterized by these excessive vices increase the likelihood that their employees will behave unethically. The excessive vices are patronization, pompousness, lavishness, zealotry, overexposure, talkativeness, (...)
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  17.  1
    Sustainability Assurance and Cost of Capital: Does Assurance Impact on Credibility of Corporate Social Responsibility Information?Jennifer Martínez‐Ferrero & Isabel‐María García‐Sánchez - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):223-239.
    This paper aims to examine the credibility value of sustainability assurance and the type of assurance provider on cost of capital. A large sample of international companies from the period 2007–2014 was used to develop our models of analysis. We find a greater decrease in cost of capital for companies that publish and assure their social and environmental reports. Thus, voluntary sustainability disclosures decrease the cost of capital. However, companies also have the opportunity to reinforce this decrease by providing an (...)
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  18.  2
    The Influence of Media, Positive Perception, and Identification on Survey‐Based Measures of Corruption.Heungsik Park & Jimoon Lee - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):312-320.
    This study examines the influence of some suspected sources of bias on perceptions of public sector corruption. These sources include dependence on two types of media as information sources about corruption: traditional and social media, positive perception of public employees, and social identification with public employees. Data were collected through a face-to-face survey of the general public in South Korea. The sample comprised 472 respondents evenly dispersed across the country. Through regression analysis, we found that dependence on traditional media—but not (...)
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  19.  4
    Desire to Be Ethical or Ability to Self‐Control: Which is More Crucial for Ethical Behavior?Tuvana Rua, Leanna Lawter & Jeanine Andreassi - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):288-299.
    Promoting ethical decisions and behaviors is challenging for any organization. Yet managers are still required to make ethical decisions under conditions which deplete their self-control resources, such as high stress and long hours. This study examines the relationships among symbolic and internal moral identity, self-control, and ethical behavior, and investigates whether self-control acts as the mechanism through which moral identity leads to ethical behavior. Findings indicate that internal moral identity overrides symbolic moral identity in the relationship with self-control and that (...)
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  20.  2
    CSR and the Workplace Attitudes of Irregular Employees: The Case of Subcontracted Workers in Korea.Mohammad A. Ali & Heung‐Jun Jung - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):130-146.
    In recent years, there has been a noticeable increase in organizational trends to hire irregular workers. This inclination, in a time of great flux and uncertainty, exacerbates human resource issues faced by firms. We argue that corporate social responsibility can be an important antecedent to improve the workplace attitudes of irregular workers and as a result reduce the negative impact on organizations of the increased use of an irregular workforce. Hence, we explore the relationship between perceived CSR and unfairness perception (...)
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  21.  9
    Leadership Styles and Corporate Social Responsibility Management: Analysis From a Gender Perspective.Maria del Mar Alonso‐Almeida, Jordi Perramon & Llorenc Bagur‐Femenias - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):147-161.
    Companies' perceptions of corporate social responsibility have been only partially analyzed from an individual perspective that focuses on personal characteristics and professional backgrounds. However, a gap exists in the research on manager leadership styles and CSR perceptions from a gender perspective. Therefore, this article analyzes differences in attitudes toward various dimensions of CSR by focusing on the leadership styles—transformational, dominance, and dual perspectives—of male and female managers in Spain. A total of 391 respondents in top management positions in Spain were (...)
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  22.  2
    Engaging with Environmental Stakeholders: Routes to Building Environmental Capabilities in the Context of the Low Carbon Economy.Polina Baranova & Maureen Meadows - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):112-129.
    The transition to a low carbon economy demands new strategies to enable organizations to take advantage of the potential for “green” growth. An organization's environmental stakeholders can provide opportunities for growth and support the success of its low carbon strategies, as well as potentially acting as a constraint on new initiatives. Building environmental capabilities through engagement with environmental stakeholders is conceptualized as an important aspect for the success of organizational low carbon strategies. We examine capability building across a range of (...)
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  23.  7
    Political Dependence, Social Scrutiny, and Corporate Philanthropy: Evidence From Disaster Relief.Yongqiang Gao & Taïeb Hafsi - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):189-203.
    This study explores why and how firms respond to social demands through philanthropic giving in the context of a severe natural disaster. Drawing on Marquis and Qian's organizational response model to government signals, we integrate resource dependence theory and institutional theory to build a two-step model of organizational response to social needs, in situations of disaster relief. We argue that firms depending more on the government for support are more likely to donate in disaster relief, while firms who receive more (...)
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  24.  2
    Institutional Investors as Stewards of the Corporation: Exploring the Challenges to the Monitoring Hypothesis.Mila R. Ivanova - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):175-188.
    The study explores the challenges UK-based institutional investors face when trying to monitor investee companies and influence their social, environmental, and governance practices. Consistent with previous research, I find that misalignment of interests within the investment chain and dispersed ownership are factors which inhibit investor activism. However, other underexplored challenges include lack of investee company transparency and investor experience in activism, as well as low client demand for engagement and internal conflicts of interest. The results contribute to the literature on (...)
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  25.  1
    The Role of Female Directors in Promoting CSR Practices: An International Comparison Between Family and Non‐Family Businesses.Lázaro Rodríguez‐Ariza, Beatriz Cuadrado‐Ballesteros, Jennifer Martínez‐Ferrero & Isabel‐María García‐Sánchez - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):162-174.
    This article analyzes a panel of 550 international firms, for the period 2004 to 2010, to compare the role of female directors in family and non-family firms in promoting responsible practices. Many studies have associated the presence of women on the board with a higher degree of socially responsible commitment. However, we found that this is much less so in family firms than in non-family firms. In family firms, corporate social responsibility commitment does not vary significantly with the presence of (...)
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  26.  2
    Green Governance? Local Politics and Ethical Businesses in Great Britain.Tony Bradley & Curtis Ziniel - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):18-30.
    One of the least understood aspects of the world-wide “greening of markets” is the emergence of local “ethical marketplaces” and the subset of alternative business models described as “ethical businesses.” But previous research has demonstrated the ability of local politicians to encourage their regions toward more ethical marketplaces. This paper explores the impact radical centrist third party representation has on the emergence of ethical businesses across Great Britain. To understand this relationship, we utilize a novel data set of organizations with (...)
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  27.  2
    The Assessment of Individual Moral Goodness.B. Chiu Raymond & D. Hackett Rick - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):31-46.
    In a field dominated by research on moral prescription and moral prediction, there is poor understanding of the place of moral perceptions in organizations alongside philosophical ethics and causal models of ethical outcomes. As leadership failures continue to plague organizational health and firms recognize the wide-ranging impact of subjective bias, scholars and practitioners need a renewed frame of reference from which to reconceptualize their current understanding of ethics as perceived in individuals. Based on an assessment and selection perspective from the (...)
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  28.  10
    Bridging the Gap: How Sustainable Development Can Help Companies Create Shareholder Value and Improve Financial Performance.Gómez‐Bezares Fernando, Przychodzen Wojciech & Przychodzen Justyna - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):1-17.
    This study examines the effect of integrating sustainability into corporate strategy on various aspects of shareholder value creation and financial performance in the British capital market. The employed method is based on the content analysis of corporate disclosures and a new technique for assessing the adoption of the corporate sustainability concept. Using extensive data of FTSE 350 firms covering the years 2006–2012, 65 companies were selected as meeting corporate sustainability criteria. For the above period, we find that these firms were (...)
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  29.  11
    The Morals of Moral Hazard: A Contracts Approach.McCaffrey Matthew - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):47-62.
    Although moral hazard is a well-known economic concept, there is a long-standing controversy over its moral implications. The language economists use to describe moral hazard is often value-laden, and implies moral judgments about the persons or actions of economic agents. This in turn leads some to question whether it is actually a scientific concept, or simply a convenient tool for criticizing certain public policies. At present, there is no consensus about the moral meaning of moral hazard, or about whether the (...)
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  30.  2
    Autocratic Tensions, Cronyism, and the Opacity of Business Information: Party Newspapers and Circulation Figures During the Francoist Dictatorship.Gago‐Rodríguez Susana & Núñez‐Nickel Manuel - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):80-95.
    Autocracies draw their political power from cronyism and organized repression. The opacity of business information protects these regimes and their crony firms from any opposition. However, autocracies might also desire to eliminate cronyism because it dampens economic growth. Autocracies survive through repression that engenders tensions, as evident in the Spanish newspaper industry during the Francoist dictatorship. State control over this industry was important because the press disseminated news to the public. From 1939 to 1957, the autocracy institutionalized both cronyism and (...)
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  31.  2
    Corporate Recidivism in Emerging Economies.Qinqin Zheng & Rosa Chun - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (1):63-79.
    Prior research on corporate misconduct pays extensive attention to single misconduct behaviors. However, little research has addressed recidivism – the repeated behaviors of corporate misconduct. Based on institutional theory and using the context of emerging economies where recidivism plays a considerable role, we propose the path dependency of corporate recidivism and suggest that three influential factors exist: internal preconditioning, inter-organizational imitation, and the prevailing external evaluation. Our event history analysis of 1,036 listed companies in China over the period 2001–2008 statistically (...)
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