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  1.  8
    Cecile Fabre, Economic Statecraft: Human Rights, Sanctions and Conditionality.Michael L. Gross - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):119-122.
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  2.  13
    Review of David Birks and Thomas Douglas, eds., Treatment for Crime: Philosophical Essays on Neurointerventions in Criminal Justice: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018, 384 pp. [REVIEW]Jason Hanna - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):123-129.
    Neurological interventions are sometimes used to prevent criminal behavior. For instance, in some jurisdictions, sex offenders can be compelled to undergo treatment designed to reduce sexual desire. As David Birks and Thomas Douglas observe in their introduction to this volume, “chemical castration” may be just the tip of the iceberg. As neuroscience advances, it could reveal many other ways to control criminality. For instance, pharmacological treatments may help combat violent behavior or drug abuse. Such “crime-preventing neurointerventions” have been controversial. On (...)
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  3.  10
    Reasonable Self-doubt.Ofer Malcai & Ram Rivlin - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):25-45.
    Sometimes, the availability of more evidence for a conclusion provides a reason to believe in its falsity. This counter-intuitive phenomenon is related to the idea of higher-order evidence, which has attracted broad interest in recent epistemological literature. Occasionally, providing more evidence for something weakens the case in its favor, by casting doubt on the probative value of other evidence of the same sort or on the fact-finder’s cognitive performance. We analyze this phenomenon, discuss its rationality, and outline possible application to (...)
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  4.  13
    What’s Wrong with Religious Establishment?David Miller - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):75-89.
    Is it possible for a liberal society to have an established church? After outlining the conditions for liberal establishment, I take from David Hume a secular argument in its favour that points to the moderating effect of establishment on religious discourse and practice. I examine the claim that state support for religion violates liberal equality, and argue that, with respect to state-provided public goods generally, what matters is that the whole package should be of roughly equal benefit to each citizen; (...)
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  5.  12
    Religious Accommodation and Disproportionate Burden.Alan Patten - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):61-74.
    The paper offers a critical engagement with Cécile Laborde’s book, Liberalism’s Religion. It elaborates several objections to Laborde’s account of religious accommodations, and sketches an alternative approach.
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  6.  19
    On Laborde’s Liberalism.Jonathan Quong - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):47-59.
    This paper discusses Cécile Laborde’s book, Liberalism’s Religion. First, I pose some questions about how Laborde’s central proposal—disaggregating religion—is meant to solve the two most serious challenges that she argues confront existing liberal egalitarian theories. Second, I respond to some of the objections Laborde presses against my conception of political liberalism. Third, I argue that Laborde is mistaken in adopting accessibility as the appropriate standard for reasons within public justification. Finally, I suggest that Laborde’s view is, in the end, too (...)
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  7.  10
    Religion’s Liberalism.Jeremy Waldron - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (1):91-103.
    This article explores the relation between modern liberalism and the religious foundations of public life. It is intended to complement Cecile Laborde’s book, Liberalism’s Religion, by showing that religious idea are capable of generating and sustaining liberal principles in their own way.
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  8.  58
    The Expressivist Objection to Nonconsensual Neurocorrectives.Gabriel De Marco & Thomas Douglas - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy.
    Neurointerventions—interventions that physically or chemically modulate brain states—are sometimes imposed on criminal offenders for the purposes of diminishing the risk that they will recidivate, or, more generally, of facilitating their rehabilitation. One objection to the nonconsensual implementation of such interventions holds that this expresses a disrespectful message, and is thus impermissible. In this paper, we respond to this objection, focusing on the most developed version of it—that presented by Elizabeth Shaw. We consider a variety of messages that might be expressed (...)
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