Year:

  1. J. P. Moreland, Khaldoun A. Sweis, and Chad V. Meister , Debating Christian Theism, Oxford University Press, 2013.James Arcadi - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):238--242.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Heschel, Hiddenness, and the God of Israel.Joshua Blanchard - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):109--124.
    Drawing on the writings of the Jewish thinker, Abraham Joshua Heschel, I defend a partial response to the problem of divine hiddenness. A Jewish approach to divine love includes the thought that God desires meaningful relationship not only with individual persons, but also with communities of persons. In combination with John Schellenberg’s account of divine love, the admission of God’s desire for such relationships makes possible that a person may fail to believe that God exists not because of any individual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Who is God.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):3--22.
    The Hindu Brahmanas record that God’s reply to the question ”Who are you?’ was simply ”Who’: ”Who is the God whom we should honour with the oblation’: an indicative, as well as interrogative! Might this also be what Aeschylus intended by his reference to ”Zeus hostis pot’estin’ : not an expression of doubt, but of acknowledged mystery? The name by which He is to be called, perhaps, is not ”Zeus’ but, exactly, ”Whoever’. And most famously the God that Moses encountered, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Hope and the Problem of Divine Silence.Aaron D. Cobb - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):157--178.
    The silence of God either by itself or in circumstances of profound suffering can induce hopelessness and despair, eroding a person’s ability to act in ways conducive to her own good. Given the role of hope in human agency, the loss of hope is an event of a significant moral and personal concern. And the standard responses to the problem of divine hiddenness may not address the existential crises occasioned by God’s silence. This paper seeks to develop and address this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    Reflections on the Deep Connection Between Problems of Evil and Problems of Divine Hiddenness.Dougherty Trent - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):65--84.
    In the literature on the subject, it is common to understand the problem of divine hiddenness and the problem of evil as distinct problems. Schellenberg and van Inwagen are representative. Such a sharp distinction is not so obvious to me. In this essay, I explore the relationship between the problem of evil and the problem of divine hiddenness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Michael Almeida, The Metaphysics of Perfect Beings, Routledge, 2008.Nikk Effingham - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):243--247.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Infinite Striving and the Infinite Subject: A Kierkegaardian Reply to Schellenberg.Jeffrey Hanson - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):143--156.
    In this paper I argue -- pace J. L. Schellenberg -- that it remains the case for Kierkegaard that infinite striving, properly understood, is essential to the relationship with God, who remains the Infinite Subject, one necessarily hidden for defensible logical, ontological, and existential reasons. Thus Kierkegaard’s arguments for the hiddenness of God as a logically required ingredient in the relationship that human beings are called to undertake with God can withstand Schellenberg’s criticisms.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    ’Once For All’: The Tense of the Atonement.Robin Le Poidevin - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):179--194.
    Does a proper understanding of the Atonement -- the restoration of mankind’s relationship with God as a result of Christ’s sacrifice -- require a particular conception of time? It has been suggested that it does, and that the relevant conception is a ”tensed’ or ”dynamic’ one, in which distinctions between past, present and future reflect the objective passage of time. This paper examines two arguments that might be given for that contention, and finds that both may be answered by appeal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Paul M. Gould, Beyond the Control of God? Six Views on the Problem of God and Abstract Objects , Bloomsbury, 2014.McNabb Tyler Dalton - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):234--238.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Paul M. Gould, Beyond the Control of God?McNabb Tyler Dalton - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):234-238.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  1
    Desiring the Hidden God: Knowledge Without Belief.Julian Perlmutter - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):51--64.
    For many people, the phenomenon of divine hiddenness is so total that it is far from clear to them that God exists at all. Reasonably enough, they therefore do not believe that God exists. Yet it is possible, whilst lacking belief in God’s reality, nonetheless to see it as a possibility that is both realistic and attractive; and in this situation, one will likely want to be open to the considerable benefits that would be available if God were real. In (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski, Epistemic Authority: A~Theory of Trust, Authority, and Autonomy in Belief, Oxford University Press, 2012.Roger Pouivet - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):227--230.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski, Epistemic Authority.Roger Pouivet - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):227-230.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  1
    On Propositional Platonism, Representation, and Divine Conceptualism.C. P. Ruloff - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):195--212.
    Gould and Davis have recently argued for the claim that Propositional Platonism is mistaken since it is not able to explain how a proposition comes to bear its representational properties. But, say Gould and Davis, if Propositional Platonism is mistaken, then Divine Conceptualism must be true and we should therefore identify propositions with the contents of a divine mind, i.e., God. In this paper, I argue that Gould and Davis’ argument against Propositional Platonism fails since it depends upon a number (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. What is Apophaticism? Ways of Talking About an Ineffable God.Scott Michael & Citron Gabriel - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):23--49.
    Apophaticism -- the view that God is both indescribable and inconceivable -- is one of the great medieval traditions of philosophical thought about God, but it is largely overlooked by analytic philosophers of religion. This paper attempts to rehabilitate apophaticism as a serious philosophical option. We provide a clear formulation of the position, examine what could appropriately be said and thought about God if apophaticism is true, and consider ways to address the charge that apophaticism is self-defeating. In so doing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    Common Core/Diversity Dilemma, Agatheism and the Epistemology of Religious Belief.Thomas D. Senor - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):213--226.
    The essay “The Common-Core/Diversity Dilemma: Revisions of Humean Thought, New Empirical Research, and the Limits of Rational Religious Belief‘ is a bold argument for the irrationality of “first-order‘ religious belief. However, unlike those associated with “New Atheism,‘ the paper’s authors Branden Thornhill-Miller and Peter Millican claim both that there are prospects for rational “second-order‘ religious belief and that religious belief and practice can play a positive role in human life. In response to Thornhill-Miller and Millican, Janusz Salamon has argued that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. J. A. Van Slyke, The Cognitive Science of Religion, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2011.Hans van Eyghen - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):231--233.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Moses Maimonides on Job’s Happiness and the Riddle of the Divine Transcendence.N. Verbin - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):125--141.
    The paper explores the nature and role of divine transcendence in Maimonides by focusing on the figure of Job as he is understood by him. In the first part, I discuss Maimonides’ diagnosis of Job’s suffering. In the second, I focus on Maimonides’ analysis of the nature of its defeat, and the manners in which that defeat involves the mediation of divine transcendence and hiddenness. In the third, I discuss some of the difficulties involved within the picture presented in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Evidentially Compelling Religious Experiences and the Moral Status of Naturalism.Travis Dumsday - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):123--144.
    Religious experiences come in a variety of types, leading to multiple taxonomies. One sort that has not received much attention as a distinct topic is what I will call ”evidentially compelling religious experience’. The nature of an ECRE is such that if it actually occurs, its occurrence plausibly entails the falsity of metaphysical naturalism. Examples of ECREs might include visions / auditions / near-death experiences conveying information the hearer could not have known through natural means, later verified; unambiguously miraculous healings; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    Can a Philosophical Justification of Ethics Be Autonomous While Acknowledging the Role of God in Grounding Moral Facts?Halbig Christoph - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):93--108.
    Autonomy and ethics are related to each other in complex ways. The paper starts by distinguishing and characterizing three basic dimensions of this relation. It proceeds by arguing for the compatibility of moral realism with a due respect for human autonomy. Nevertheless, supernaturalist moral realism seems to pose a special challenge for the autonomy of ethics as a self-standing normative realm. The paper ends with some considerations on the role of divine authority both in metaethics and in the general theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  1
    Diverse Religious Experiences and First Order Religious Beliefs.Heim S. Mark - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):237--255.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Freedom: On the Concept and the Reality of Human Autonomy.Lutz-Bachmann Matthias - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):35--58.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Metaphysical Supernaturalism and Morally Worthy Actions.Niederbacher Sj Bruno - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):59--73.
    This article is an attempt to solve the question whether there is a version of metaphysical supernaturalism that grants both: first, that moral facts depend in a metaphysical strong way on God, and second, that agnostics and atheists are nevertheless able to perform morally worthy actions. The solution that is developed in this paper builds on a distinction between the proximate and the remote goodmakers of actions. It is argued that the proximate goodmakers of actions can be cognized also by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    On Second-Order Religion, Agatheism and Naturalism. A Reply to Branden Thornhill-Miller, Peter Millican and Janusz Salamon.Graham Oppy - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):257--272.
    These comments, on the paper by Branden Thornhill-Miller and Peter Millican 1 and on the critique of that paper by Janusz Salamon 2, divide into four sections. In the first two sections, I briefly sketch some of the major themes from the paper by Thornhill-Miller and Millican, and then from the critique by Salamon. In the final two sections, I provide some critical thoughts on Salamon’s objections to Thornhill-Miller and Millican, and then on the leading claims made by Thornhill-Miller and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    Could God Fail to Exist?Joshua Rasmussen - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):159--177.
    I apply developments in modal reasoning to the question of whether God has necessary existence. My larger task is to assess the main reasons to think that God is not a metaphysically necessary being. I consider Hume’s conceivability-based argument, and then I pay attention to more recent arguments, including Swinburne’s neo-Humean argument and the subtraction argument. I show that such arguments face a ”parity’ problem, since the very reasoning that gets them off the ground also launches parallel arguments for an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. God’s Being Is in Becoming: An Essay in Theological Idealism.Hartmut von Sass - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):145--157.
    God’s being is becoming -- the title is the thesis. The first section of this paper will be dedicated to the problem of radical historicity in sketching three dogmatic approaches dealing with the relation between God and history. After critically introducing the concept of relational -- in contrast to intrinsic -- properties in the second section I will apply a revised version of this concept theologically in integrating it into the architecture of Trinitarian thinking. Accordingly, and on that basis, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Secondary-Cause Autonomy and Divine Motivation.Christian Schröer - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):75--92.
    An act-theoretical view on the profile of responsibility discourse shows in what sense not only all kinds of technical, pragmatic and moral reason, but also all kinds of religious motivation cannot justify a human action sufficiently without acknowledgment to three basic principles of human autonomy as supreme limiting conditions that are human dignity, sense, and justifiability. According to Thomas Aquinas human beings ultimately owe their moral autonomy to a divine creator. So this autonomy can be considered as an expression of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Compulsion or Attractiveness - A False Dichotomy? A Kantian Perspective on the Sources of Moral Motivation.Maria Schwartz - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):21--34.
    The essay questions the dichotomy between ”push’ and ”pull’ motivation to act morally, asking for the motivational power of Kant’s categorical imperative instead, its functionality as well as its sources. With reference to Christine Korsgaard it can be shown that personal integrity together with the notion of an ideal common world form one single source of motivation, grounded in exercising our autonomy. In a last step this outline of a kantian ethics of automony is related to the notion of God, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. The Problem of Evil and a Critique of Religious Reason.Vladimir K. Shokhin - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):201--212.
    The author’s goal is to weigh capabilities of theistic reason in regard to the problem of evil, and two formats of reasoning in this regard are strictly differed, i.e. attempts at building theodicies and defenses. The upshot is that while there is no doubt that the great multitude of evils and sufferings in the world are surely beyond reach of any theodicies, it is similarly doubtless that many sound reasons are suitable for countering atheist “evidential refutations‘. Some new arguments are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    A Defense of First and Second-Order Theism: The Limits of Empirical Inquiry and the Rationality of Religious Belief.Charles Taliaferro & Christophe Porot - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):213--235.
    We argue that the use of the term “supernatural‘ is problematic in philosophy of religion in general, and in the contribution by Thornhill-Miller and Millican in particular. We address the disturbing parallel between Hume’s case against the rationality of belief in miracles and his dismissal of reports of racial equality. We do not argue that because Hume was a racist therefore his view against miracles is faulty, but we draw attention to how Hume sets up a framework that, for similar (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Tertullian the Unitarian.Dale Tuggy - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):179--199.
    Tertullian is often celebrated as an early trinitarian, or at least a near- trinitarian, proto-trinitarian, or trinitarian with unfortunate ”subordinationist’ tendencies. In this paper I shall show that Tertullian was a unitarian, and not at all a trinitarian.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  4
    Divine Motivation Theory and Exemplarism.Linda Zagzebski - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (3):109--121.
    In this paper I summarize two versions of a new form of ethical theory in which all basic moral terms are defined by direct reference to exemplars of goodness. I call the Christian form Divine Motivation Theory in a book by the same name, and the more general form I call Exemplarist Virtue Theory or Exemplarist Moral Theory. In the Christian form the supreme exemplar is God. In exemplarist virtue theory exemplars are superbly admirable persons or fictional characters, whose goodness (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues