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  1.  19
    We Believe: Group Belief and the Liturgical Use of Creeds.Joshua Cockayne - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    The recitation of creeds in corporate worship is widespread in the Christian tradition. Intuitively, the use of creeds captures the belief not only of the individuals reciting it, but of the Church as a whole. This paper seeks to provide a philosophical analysis of the meaning of the words, ‘We believe…’, in the context of the liturgical recitation of the Creed. Drawing from recent work in group ontology, I explore three recent accounts of group belief and consider the potential of (...)
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  2.  37
    The Psychopath Objection to Divine Command Theory.Matthew Alexander Flannagan - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    : Recently, Erik Wielenberg has developed a novel objection to divine command meta-ethics. The objection that DCM "has the implausible implication that psychopaths have no moral obligations and hence their evil acts, no matter how evil, are morally permissible". This article criticizes Wielenberg's argument. Section 1 will expound Wielenberg's new "psychopath" argument in the context of the recent debate over the Promulgation Objection. Section 2 will discuss two ambiguities in the argument; in particular, Wielenberg’s formulation is ambiguous between whether Wielenberg (...)
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  3.  15
    Cognitive Regeneration and the Noetic Effects of Sin: Why Theology and Cognitive Science May Not Be Compatible.Lari Launonen - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    Justin Barrett and Kelly James Clark have suggested that cognitive science of religion supports the existence of a god-faculty akin to sensus divinitatis. They propose that God may have given rise to the god-faculty via guided evolution. This suggestion raises two theological worries. First, our natural cognition seems to favor false god-beliefs over true ones. Second, it also makes us prone to tribalism. If God hates idolatry and moral evil, why would he give rise to mind with such biases? A (...)
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  4.  18
    Grounding Individuality in Illusion: A Philosophical Exploration of Advaita Vedānta in Light of Contemporary Panpsychism.Mikael Leidenhag - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    The metaphysical vision of Advaita Vedānta has been making its way into some corners of Western analytic philosophy, and has especially garnered attention among those philosophers who are seeking to develop metaphysical systems in opposition to both reductionist materialism and dualism. Given Vedānta’s monistic view of consciousness, it might seem natural to put Vedānta in dialogue with the growing position of panpsychism which, although not fully monistic, similarly takes mind to be a fundamental feature of reality. This paper will evaluate (...)
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  5.  18
    Why God Thinks What He is Thinking? An Argument Against Samuel Newlands’ Brute–Fact–Theory of Divine Ideas in Leibniz’s Metaphysics.Jan Levin Propach - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    According to the most prominent principle of early modern rationalists, the Principle of Sufficient Reason [PSR], there are no brute facts, hence, there are no facts without any explanation. Contrary to the PSR, some philosophers have argued that divine ideas are brute facts within Leibniz’s metaphysics. In this paper, I argue against brute-fact-theories of divine ideas, especially represented by Samuel Newlands in Leibniz and the Ground of Possibility, and elaborate an alternative Leibnizian theory of divine ideas.
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  6.  89
    What is God's Power?Graham Renz - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    Theists claim that God can make a causal difference in the world. That is, theists believe that God is causally efficacious, has power. Discussion of divine power has centered on understanding better the metaphysics of creation and sustenance, special intervention, governance, and providing an account of omnipotence consistent with other divine attributes, such as omnibenevolence. But little discussion has centered on what, deep down ontologically, God’s power is. I show that a number of prominent accounts of power fail to model (...)
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  7.  43
    On Ritual and Legislation.Eric L. Hutton - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):45-64.
    Confucian thinkers have traditionally stressed the importance of li 禮, or “ritual” as it is commonly translated, and believed that ancient sages had established an ideal set of rituals for people to follow. Now, most scholars of Confucianism understand li as distinct from law, and hence do not typically discuss Confucian sages as great lawgivers. Nevertheless, I suggest that there is something valuable to be learned from considering the similarities and dissimilarities between great lawgivers and the sages. In particular, this (...)
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  8.  39
    Preface to Special Issue of the European Journal for Philosophy of Religion: Confucian and Islamic Approaches to Rituals and Modern Life.Philip Ivanhoe - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):1-15.
  9.  37
    Love That Takes Time: Pursuing Relationship in the Context of Hiddenness.Derek King - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):121-143.
    This paper offers a fresh strategy for responding to J.L. Schellenberg’s argument from divine hiddenness, called the dianthropic strategy. First, it shows how Schellenberg’s understanding of openness is deficient by arguing that openness to relationship is consistent with initial concealment. Then, the paper develops the dianthropic strategy, which focuses on the role of other persons in making a relationship between God and the nonbeliever more likely. It distinguishes this strategy from the responsibility argument and anticipates objections.
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  10.  7
    Review: Divine Action, Determinism, and the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Koperski - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):211-213.
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  11.  9
    Review: Divine Action, Determinism, and the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW]Jeremy Koperski - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):211-213.
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  12.  47
    Religion Without Eschatology.Joanna Leidenhag - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):163-178.
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  13. Xunzi’s Ritual Model and Modern Moral Education.Colin Joseph Lewis - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):17-43.
    While the early Confucians were largely content to maintain the rituals of ancient kings as the core of moral education in their time, it is not obvious that contemporary humans could, or should, draw from the particulars of such a tradition. Indeed, even if one takes ritual seriously as a tool for cultivation, there remains a question of how to design moral education programs incorporating ritual. This essay examines impediments faced by a ritualized approach to moral education, how they might (...)
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  14.  28
    Replies to Leidenhag and Trakakis.John L. Schellenberg - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):195-206.
    In this essay, I reply to the comments of Joanna Leidenhag and Nick Trakakis on my book Religion After Science: The Cultural Consequences of Religious Immaturity.
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  15.  17
    Can Ritual Be Modern? Liquid Modernity, Social Acceleration and Li-Inspired Ritual.Geir Sigurdsson - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):65-89.
    Our late modernity has been characterized by Zygmunt Bauman and Hartmut Rosa as, respectively, “liquid” and “accelerated”. These are demanding aspects of reality that have elicited both adaptive and resisting responses. While the drive to adapt has generally been favoured, especially by the corporate sector, a certain resistance to the tendency is also notable among ordinary citizens. It will be argued in this paper, first, that while adaptation evokes Daoist insights, such an association is misleading and an unqualified kind of (...)
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  16.  9
    Book Review of John Martin Fischer, Death, Immortality, and Meaning in Life. [REVIEW]James Stacey Taylor - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):213-218.
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  17.  62
    How to Be an Agnostic.Nick N. Trakakis - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):179-194.
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  18.  53
    Confucianism and Rituals for Women in Chosŏn Korea.Hwa Yeong Wang - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):91-120.
    This essay offers an analysis of the writing and practices of Song Siyŏl as a way to explore the philosophical concepts and philosophizing process of Confucian ritual in relation to women. As a symbolic and influential figure in Korean philosophy and politics, his views contributed to shaping the orthodox interpretation of the theory and practice of Neo-Confucian ritual regarding women. By demonstrating and analyzing what kinds of issues were discussed in terms of women in four family rituals, I delineate the (...)
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  19.  37
    Are Reduplicative Qua-Operators Superfluous?Eric Yang - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):145-162.
    Reduplicative approaches to the incarnation attempt to avoid the charge of incoherence by employing a qua-operator that operates on an entire assertion. The main objection to this approach is that it still yields a contradiction. Recently, two new reduplicative approaches have been offered that purport to avoid contradiction, one that offers a novel analysis of negative predications and the other which prevents conjoining divine and human predicates into a meaningful sentence. In this paper, I argue that these newer approaches either (...)
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  20.  8
    Review of Craig, William Lane, Wielenberg, Erik J., Johnson, Adam Lloyd, Ed. A Debate on God and Morality: What is the Best Account of Objective Moral Values and Duties?. New York: Routledge, 2020. Xii+234 Pp. [REVIEW]Ferhat Yoney - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):207-211.
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  21. Another Look at the Modal Collapse Argument.Omar Fakhri - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):1-23.
    On one classical conception of God, God has no parts, not even metaphysical parts. God is not composed of form and matter, act and potency, and he is not composed of existence and essence. God is absolutely simple. This is the doctrine of Absolute Divine Simplicity. It is claimed that ADS implies a modal collapse, i.e. that God’s creation is absolutely necessary. I argue that a proper way of understanding the modal collapse argument naturally leads the proponent of ADS to (...)
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  22.  34
    The “Falling Elevator” and Resurrection From the Dead.Igor Gasparov - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):83-102.
    In the paper I argue that the "falling elevator" model once proposed by Dean Zimmerman to improve some drawbacks of Peter van Inwagen's account of how a belief in Christian resurrection could be made compatible with a materialist understanding of human persons is not satisfactory. Christian resurrection requires not only a survival, but also true death of a person, while the falling elevator can merely provide us with an account of how a material person is able miraculously to escape its (...)
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  23.  66
    The Trinity and the New Testament – a Counter-Challenge to Dale Tuggy.William Hasker - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):179-199.
    Dale Tuggy argues that my trinitarian views are in conflict with the theology of the New Testament; the New Testament, rather, is unitarian. I show several flaws in this argument, and point out the New Testament evidence that eventually led to the formulation of the doctrine of the Trinity.
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  24. Varieties of Theism and Explanations of Moral Realism.Anne Jeffrey - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):25-50.
    Does theism make a difference to whether there are moral facts? In this paper I suggest that, despite how much uptake this question gets in philosophical literature, it is not well formed. “Theism” leaves too indeterminate what God is like for us to discern what difference God’s existence would make to moral facts. Arguments like the explanans-driven argument for theistic moral realism and the explanationist argument for naturalist moral realism both require extra substantive assumptions about God in order to be (...)
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  25.  44
    How To Hang A Door: Picking Hinges for Quasi-Fideism.Nicholas Smith - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):51-82.
    : In the epistemology of the late Wittgenstein, a central place is given to the notion of the hinge: an arational commitment that provides a foundation of some sort for the rest of our beliefs. Quasi-fideism is an approach to the epistemology of religion that argues that religious belief is on an epistemic par with other sorts of belief inasmuch as religious and non-religious beliefs all rely on hinges. I consider in this paper what it takes to find the appropriate (...)
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  26.  36
    Hegel’s Account of Christianity and Religious Alienation.Jon Stewart - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):129-152.
    In his Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, Hegel argues that the development of the religions of the world leads up to and culminates in Christianity, which is the one true religion. One key element which separates Christianity from the other religions, according to Hegel, concerns the issue of alienation. He argues that the previous religions all contain some form of alienation, which can be found in their conceptions of the divine. In this paper, I wish to examine Hegel’s view (...)
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  27.  55
    Hasker’s Tri-Personal God Vs. New Testament Theology.Dale Tuggy - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):153-177.
    Hasker’s “social” Trinity theory is subject to considerable philosophical problems. More importantly, the theory clashes with the clear New Testament teaching that the one God just is the Father alone. Further, in light of five undeniable facts about the New Testament texts, we can know that the authors of the New Testament thought that the only God was just the Father himself, not the Trinity. Hasker can neither deny these facts nor defeat the strong evidence they provide that in affirming (...)
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  28.  35
    The “Dual Sources Account,” Predestination, and the Problem of Hell.Adam Noel Wood - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):103-127.
    W. Matthews Grant's "Dual Sources Account" aims at explaining how God causes all creaturely actions while leaving them free in a robust libertarian sense. It includes an account of predestination that is supposed to allow for the possibility that some created persons ultimately spend eternity in hell. I argue here that the resources Grant provides for understanding why God might permit created persons to end up in hell are, for two different reasons, insufficient. I then provide possible solutions to these (...)
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