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  1.  10
    Pragmatism and Verbal Behaviourism. Mead’s and Sellars’ Theories of Meaning and Introspection.Guido Baggio - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (4):243-267.
    The article highlights George Herbert Mead’s and Wilfrid Sellars’ reliance on a behaviourally-grounded conception of meaning as strictly related to the possibility of distinguishing mental from non-mental phenomena as both related to the semantic dimension. Mead’s position is in fact akin to Wilfrid Sellars’ argument that the concepts of ‘inner events’ are essentially inter-subjective. Thoughts are displayed as consisting of related linguistic acts linked inferentially through intra-linguistic moves that respond to a particular ‘language practice’ governed by norms. Introspection is an (...)
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  2.  9
    The Metaphysical Grounding of Logical Operations: John Dewey’s Theory of Qualitative Continuity.Paul Benjamin Cherlin - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (4):311-324.
    In John Dewey’s logical theory, qualities or qualitative relations account for the capacity to distinguish and associate the objects of reflective thought; they are antecedent to reflective analysis and necessary for coherent processes of inquiry. In Dewey’s writings that are specifically “metaphysical” in orientation, he is much more vague about the function of qualities, but does call them “generic traits of existence.” As such, they appear to be central to his mature ontological theory. In order to more fully understand the (...)
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  3.  11
    Ownership and First-Person Authority From a Normative Pragmatist Perspective.Patrizio Lo Presti - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (4):268-285.
    Mental episodes are typically associated with subjective ownership and first-person authority. My belief that an apple is red is had by me; it is mine and I’m in a privileged position to know it. Your experience of red is had by you; it is yours and you are in a privileged position to know it. The two assumptions are that mental events are had by individuals to whom they occur, and that owners are in a privileged epistemic position to fallibly (...)
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  4.  8
    A Problem for Environmental Pragmatism: Value Pluralism and the Sustainability Principle.Okke Loman - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (4):286-310.
    In this article, I suggest that the recently emerged perspective of environmental pragmatism encompasses self-contradicting principles. For many years, it was deemed impossible for environmental ethics to formulate justified environmental policy. Environmental pragmatism, and its primary scholar Bryan G. Norton, has promoted a new outlook in that debate by proposing an ideal methodology based upon classic American pragmatism. In this methodology, a community can determine what is morally righteous by conducting open-ended inquiry and considering all relevant stakeholders in a rational (...)
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  5.  9
    How Fascism Works, and Why ‘Pragmatism’ Does Not.Tadd Ruetenik - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (4):325-332.
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  6.  10
    Science and the Pragmatist Image of Humanity: Lessons From Wilfrid Sellars and Beyond.Emil Višňovský - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (4):229-242.
    The paper focuses on the pragmatist image of humanity based on a re-reading of the philosophical “manifesto” of Wilfrid Sellars in which he became entangled in the dichotomy between “scientific” and “manifest” images. The key to solving this problem, according to the author, is the new pragmatist understanding of science as a cultural practice, which provide us with a new framework for transcending this dichotomy. By reconstructing Sellars in an anthropological rather than a scientistic way and by drawing on humanistic (...)
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  7.  8
    Pragmatism for History and History for Pragmatism.Marnie Binder - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (2-3):103-123.
    A pragmatist philosopher of history asks what practical difference it makes for this or that historical “fact” to be taken as “useful and meaningful,” and then consider that the principal motivation behind what is recorded, what continues to circulate, and to what extent, in the annals of historical texts. Part of the methodology of pragmatism is derived from history, since usefulness is attested over time. History and historiography are shaped, in part, by pragmatic interests. This discussion is indispensable for the (...)
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  8.  2
    From Knowability to Conjecturability.Daniele Chiffi & Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (2-3):205-227.
    Arguments from knowability have largely been concerned with cases for and against realism, or truth as an epistemic vs. non-epistemic concept. This article proposes bringing Peirce’s pragmaticism, called here ‘action-first’ epistemology, to bear on the issue. It is shown that a notion weaker than knowability, namely conjecturability, is epistemologically a better-suited notion to describe an essential component of scientific inquiry. Moreover, unlike knowability, conjecturability does not suffer from paradoxes. Given fundamental uncertainty that permeates inquiry, knowability and what Peirce took to (...)
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  9.  5
    Dewey After the End of Art.Roberta Dreon - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (2-3):146-169.
    This article explores the significance of Hegel’s aesthetic lectures for Dewey’s approach to the arts. Although over the last two decades some brilliant studies have been published on the “permanent deposit” of Hegel in Dewey’s mature thought, the aesthetic dimension of Dewey’s engagement with Hegel’s heritage has not yet been investigated. This inquiry will be developed on a theoretical level as well as on the basis of a recent discovery: in Dewey’s Correspondence traces have been found of a lecture on (...)
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  10.  1
    The Conflictual Theory of Law.Julius M. Rogenhofer - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (2-3):170-192.
    This article introduces the conflictual theory of law as a new way of understanding laws as struggles over meaning, in which actors create and circulate social knowledge to justify their interpretation of rights. The theory addresses law-production processes and underlying knowledge/power constructs, for example, in legislative deliberations and interactions between politicians and the media. It shares pragmatist commitments to a highly participative version of democracy, attained through the active involvement of all members of society in democratic processes and rejects claims (...)
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  11.  2
    A New Temporality of Religion.Lenart Škof - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (2-3):193-204.
    In his insightful essay »Prophetic Religion and the Future of Capitalist Civilization« Cornel West fervently addressed a question of our abilities to imagine a more empathetic, more compassionate, and also more hospitable world, in which we could foresee, or perhaps already lay ground for a future community where the word religion would simply mean that we live our lives in the consciousness of our finitude and thus in an existential and cognitive humility. This kind of religion would enable us to (...)
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  12.  3
    Communities Take Roots.Eric Thomas Weber - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (2-3):124-145.
    This article draws on the past and present work of the Society of Philosophers in America, Inc. to consider eight challenges for growing communities of philosophical conversation in ways that pragmatism encourages and calls for, in terms of engaged public philosophy. The essay then proposes ways of addressing the eight challenges with solutions or outlooks for overcoming or diminishing obstacles to engaged, public philosophical and conversational community-building. The author argues that it is vital especially for pragmatists, but also for philosophers (...)
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  13.  3
    William James and the Will to Alieve.John Capps - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (1):1-20.
    William James’ “The Will to Believe” continues to attract scholarly attention. This might seem surprising since James’ central claim—that one may justifiably believe p despite having inconclusive evidence for p—seems both very clear and also very wrong. I argue that many of the interpretive and substantive challenges of this essay can be overcome by framing James’ thesis in terms of what Tamar Gendler defines as “alief.” I consider two readings of James’ position and conclude that the “will to believe” rests (...)
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  14.  2
    Engaging in an Accurate Assessment of Pluralism in William James.J. Edward Hackett - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (1):85-99.
    In this essay, I will respond to the several charges laid at my feet by Robert Talisse and Scott Aikin engaged in their response entitled “Pragmatism and ‘Existential’ Pluralism: A Response to Hackett” about my article that also appeared in Contemporary Pragmatism entitled “Why James Can Be an Existential Pluralist”. At the heart of my response lies a concern with what I call the principle of hermeneutic charity and the final view James offers us of his entire philosophy. One can (...)
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  15.  4
    On Finding the Mortal World Enough: Value, Extinction, and the Crisis of the Humanities.Nir Evron - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (1):48-69.
    This essay isolates and critically assesses the motivation behind the current backlash against the broadly culturalist and historicist paradigm that has structured research in the interpretative humanities since the 1980s. That motivation, it argues, has less to do with the noble desire to rescue the humanities from the alleged absurdities of the postmodernists than it has with a reluctance to face up fully to the secularism that many of the humanities’ contemporary critics profess. If historicism and constructivism are under attack (...)
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  16.  8
    Pragmatic Humanism and the Posthumanist Challenge: Between Biocentrism and the New Human Being.Ana Honnacker - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (1):70-84.
    Humanism is charged with fostering a harmful anthropocentrism that has led to the exploitation of non-human beings and the environment. Posthumanist and transhumanist ideas prominently aim at rethinking our self-understanding and human-nature relations. Yet these approaches turn out to be flawed when it comes to addressing the challenges of the “age of the humanity”, the Anthropocene. Whereas posthumanism fails in acknowledging the exceptional role of human beings with regard to political agency and responsibility, transhumanism overemphasizes human capabilities of controlling nature (...)
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  17. Kant, the Practical Postulates, and Clifford’s Principle.Samuel Kahn - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (1):21-47.
    In this paper I argue that Kant would have endorsed Clifford’s principle. The paper is divided into four sections. In the first, I review Kant’s argument for the practical postulates. In the second, I discuss a traditional objection to the style of argument Kant employs. In the third, I explain how Kant would respond to this objection and how this renders the practical postulates consistent with Clifford’s principle. In the fourth, I introduce positive grounds for thinking that Kant would have (...)
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