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  1.  2
    Rorty as Virtue Liberal.William M. Curtis - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (4):400-419.
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  2. Review of Practicing Philosophy as Experiencing Life. [REVIEW]Raff Donelson - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (4):445-448.
  3. Imagining Social Transformations: Territory Making and the Project of Radical Pragmatism.Dorstewitz Philipp - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (4):361-381.
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  4. Liberation Pragmatism: Dussel and Dewey in Dialogue.Alex Sager & Albert R. Spencer - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (4):1-22.
    Enrique Dussel and John Dewey share commitments to philosophical theory and practice aimed at addressing human problems, democratic modes of inquiry, and progressive social reform, but also maintain productive differences in their fundamental starting point for political philosophy and their use of the social sciences. Dussel provides a corrective to Dewey’s Eurocentrism and to his tendency to underplay the challenges of incorporating marginalized populations by insisting that social and political philosophy begin from the perspective of the marginalized and excluded. Simultaneously, (...)
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  5. Normative Pluralism.Mónica Gómez Salazar - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (4):382-399.
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  6.  34
    Redeeming Rorty’s Private–Public Distinction.Tracy Llanera - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (3):319-340.
    Rorty uses the private–public distinction as a conceptual tool to uphold the ideal of self–creation (Romanticism) simultaneously to the ideal of solidarity (Enlightenment liberalism). The difficulty of accommodating these two apparently opposing ideals has led Rorty to make inconsistent and contradictory claims about the private–public distinction. This article suggests a way of easing the tension that exists around Rorty’s formulations of the distinction. It does so by turning to the thematic of “self–enlargement” to be found in Rorty’s later writings. By (...)
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  7.  4
    Fluency, Satisfaction, Truth: Reassessing James in Light of Some Contemporary Psychology.Daniel J. Brunson - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):29-47.
    A notable feature of classical American pragmatism is its close association with the birth of experimental psychology. In particular, William James’ work as a psychologist influenced, and was influenced by, his pragmatism. This paper seeks to support this reading of the relation between Jamesian psychology and pragmatism, particularly through his “Sentiment of Rationality” and the later contention that the true is the satisfactory. In addition, James’ insights are tested and expanded through reference to contemporary research on processing fluency, as well (...)
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  8.  1
    Kantianism and Pragmatism: A Response to Margolis.Steven Levine - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):118-121.
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  9.  3
    Imagining the Given and Beyond.Lior Levy - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):70-87.
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  10.  2
    The Future of Pragmatism’s Second Life.Joseph Margolis - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):89-117.
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  11.  2
    Informality and Philosophy: A Response to Margolis.Fergal McHugh - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):122-128.
    Joseph Margolis argues that philosophy must acknowledge its radical informality. I provide a brief account of what Margolis means by informality and its consequences for the practice of a pragmatist philosophy. I discuss his criticism of Robert Brandom's analytic pragmatism on the grounds that it overemphasizes the potential gains of a formal approach. I highlight two concerns with Margolis’ insistence on informality recommending a reduced emphasis on the consequences of informality for the pragmatist philosopher.
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  12.  2
    Inclusion and the Epistemic Benefits of Deliberation.John B. Min - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):48-69.
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  13. Foraging for Coherence in Neuroscience: A Pragmatist Orientation.Jay Schulkin - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (1):1-28.
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