Health Care Analysis

ISSN: 1065-3058

21 found

View year:

  1.  9
    Moral Distress and Nursing Education: Curricular and Pedagogical Strategies for a Complex Phenomenon.Sadie Deschenes & Cathryn van Kessel - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):63-72.
    Moral distress is a common phenomenon among nurses and is related to the complicated work environments and complex nature of ethical situations in day-to-day nursing practice. Moral distress impacts nurses as well as patient care and the health care system. Few strategies have been identified for instructors to effectively engage with learners when communicating about moral distress. We discuss two key curricular and pedagogical strategies that should be utilized when learning about moral distress: difficult knowledge’ and ‘terror management theory’. Whether (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  7
    Gendering the Pandemic: Women’s Health Disparities From a Human Rights Perspective.JhuCin Rita Jhang & Po-Han Lee - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):15-32.
    As COVID-19 keeps impacting the world, its impact is felt differently by people of different sexes and genders. International guidelines and research on gender inequalities and women’s rights during the pandemic have been published. However, data from Taiwan is lacking. This study aims to fill the gap to increase our knowledge regarding this issue and provide policy recommendations. This study is part of a more extensive project in response to the fourth state report concerning the implementation of the Convention on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Consent for Medical Treatment: What is ‘Reasonable’?Abeezar Ismail Sarela - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):47-62.
    The General Medical Council (GMC) instructs doctors to act ‘reasonably’ in obtaining consent from patients. However, the GMC does not explain what it means to be reasonable: it is left to doctors to figure out the substance of this instruction. The GMC relies on the Supreme Court’s judgment in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board; and it can be assumed that the judges’ idea of reasonability is adopted. The aim of this paper is to flesh out this idea of reasonability. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  23
    Why Health-enhancing Nudges Fail.Thomas Schramme - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):33-46.
    Nudges are means to influence the will formation of people to make specific choices more likely. My focus is on nudges that are supposed to improve the health condition of individuals and populations over and above the direct prevention of disease. I point out epistemic and moral problems with these types of nudges, which lead to my conclusion that health-enhancing nudges fail. They fail because we cannot know which choices enhance individual health—properly understood in a holistic way—and because health-enhancing nudges (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  11
    The Ethics of Population Policy for the Two Worlds of Population Conditions.Ming-Jui Yeh & Po-Han Lee - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):1-14.
    Population policy has taken two divergent trajectories. In the developing part of the world, controlling population growth has been a major tune of the debate more than a half-century ago. In the more developed part of the world, an inverse pattern results in the discussion over the facilitation of population growth. The ethical debates on population policy have primarily focused on the former and ignored the latter. This paper proposes a more comprehensive account that justifies states’ population policy interventions. We (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  6
    Balancing Intellectual Property Protection and Legal Risk Assessment in Registration of Covid-19 Vaccines in Malaysia.Haniff Ahamat, Hairanie Sa’ban & Nazura Abdul Manap - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (3):196-207.
    The seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic requires a look into the implementation of drug registration rules for COVID-19 vaccines. Amidst the surrounding exigencies, vaccines being a biological product, require comprehensive and continuing pre and post registration rules to ensure their safety and efficacy. The study focuses on Malaysia which has rules on drug registration that have been successfully applied to vaccines. The study shows that the rules have been tailor-made to emergency situations. At the moment, special rules have been introduced (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  9
    Exploring the Decision-Making Process of People Living with HIV Enrolled in Antiretroviral Clinical Trials: A Qualitative Study of Decisions Guided by Trust and Emotions.Maria Feijoo-Cid, Antonia Arreciado Marañón, Ariadna Huertas, Amado Rivero-Santana, Carina Cesar, Valeria Fink, María Isabel Fernández-Cano & Omar Sued - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (3):135-155.
    The informed consent is an ethical and legal requirement for potential participants to enroll in a study. There is ample of evidence that understanding consent information and enrollment is challenging for participants in clinical trials. On the other hand, the reasoning process behind decision-making in HIV clinical trials remains mostly unexplored. This study aims to examine the decision-making process of people living with HIV currently participating in antiretroviral clinical trials and their understanding of informed consent. We conducted a qualitative socio-constructivist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  9
    Blacklisting Health Insurance Premium Defaulters: Is Denial of Medical Care Ethically Justifiable?Hanna Glaus, Daniel Drewniak, Julian W. März & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (3):156-168.
    Rising health insurance costs and the cost of living crisis are likely leading to an increase in unpaid health insurance bills in many countries. In Switzerland, a particularly drastic measure to sanction defaulting insurance payers is employed. Since 2012, Swiss cantons – who have to cover most of the bills of defaulting payers - are allowed by federal law to blacklist them and to restrict their access to medical care to emergencies.In our paper, we briefly describe blacklisting in the context (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  6
    Uninformed Origins: Should We Be Advising Parents on the Source of Medicines and Therapies?Tara E. Ness, Zachary J. Tabb, Janet Malek & Frank X. Placencia - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (3):186-195.
    Respecting patient autonomy through the process of soliciting informed consent is a cornerstone of clinical ethics. In pediatrics, until a child becomes an adult or legally emancipated, that ethical tenet takes the form of respect for parental decision-making authority. In instances of respecting religious beliefs, doing so is not always apparent and sometimes the challenge lies not only in the healthcare provider’s familiarity of religious restrictions but also their knowledge of medical interventions themselves which might conflict with those restrictions. We (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  6
    Should Severity Assessments in Healthcare Priority Setting be Risk- and Time-Sensitive?Lars Sandman & Jan Liliemark - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (3):169-185.
    Background: Severity plays an essential role in healthcare priority setting. Still, severity is an under-theorised concept. One controversy concerns whether severity should be risk- and/or time-sensitive. The aim of this article is to provide a normative analysis of this question. Methods: A reflective equilibrium approach is used, where judgements and arguments concerning severity in preventive situations are related to overall normative judgements and background theories in priority-setting, aiming for consistency. Analysis, discussion, and conclusions: There is an argument for taking the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  5
    Policy Narratives on Palliative Care in Sweden 1974–2018.Axel Ågren, Barbro Krevers, Elisabet Cedersund & Ann-Charlotte Nedlund - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (2):99-113.
    In Sweden, efforts to govern end-of-life care through policies have been ongoing since the 1970s. The aim of this study is to analyse how policy narratives on palliative care in Sweden have been formulated and have changed over time since the 1970s up to 2018. We have analysed 65 different policy-documents. After having analysed the empirical material, three policy episodes were identified. In Episode 1, focus was on the need for norms, standards and a psychological end-of-life care with the main (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  5
    Correction to: Regulating the Global Antimicrobial Commons: Climate Agreements and Beyond.Philippe Cullet - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (2):134-134.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  12
    Shared Decision Making in Psychiatry: Dissolving the Responsibility Problem.Leila El-Alti - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (2):65-80.
    Person centered care (PCC) invites ideas of shared responsibility as a direct result of its shared decision making (SDM) process. The intersection of PCC and psychiatric contexts brings about what I refer to as _the responsibility problem_, which seemingly arises when SDM is applied in psychiatric settings due to (1) patients’ potentially diminished capacities for responsibility, (2) tension prompted by professional reasons for and against sharing responsibility with patients, as well as (3) the responsibility/blame dilemma. This paper aims to do (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  13
    Development of the Inclination Toward Conscientious Objection Scale for Physicians.Şükrü Keleş, Osman Dağ, Murat Aksu, Gizem Gülpinar & Neyyire Yasemin Yalım - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (2):81-98.
    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable scale to assess whether a physician is inclined to take conscientious objection when asked to perform medical services that clash with his/her personal beliefs. The scale, named the Inclination toward Conscientious Objection Scale, was developed for physicians in Turkey. Face validity, content validity, criterion-related validity, and construct validity of the scale were evaluated in the development process. While measuring criterion-related validity, Student’s t-test was used to identify the groups that did and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  8
    Improvidence, Precaution, and the Logical-Empirical Disconnect in UK Health Policy.Jordan A. Parsons - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (2):114-133.
    The last decade has seen significant developments in UK health policy, with are largely claimed to be evidence based. However, such a characterisation ought, in many cases, to be questioned. Policies can be broadly understood as based primarily on either a logical or empirical case. In the absence of relevant empirical evidence, policymakers understandably appeal to logical cases. Once such evidence is available, however, it can inform policy and enable the logical case to be set aside. Such a linear policy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  3
    Regulating the Global Antimicrobial Commons: Climate Agreements and Beyond.Philippe Cullet - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (1):47-52.
    A treaty to regulate the global antimicrobial commons can be appropriately framed around the model provided by multilateral environmental agreements. At the same time, it is not clear that a comprehensive treaty is the only possible entry point and other options, such as an agreement on technology transfer or funding may be apt starting points. Any legal instrument adopted to regulate the global antimicrobial commons needs to reflect the global South-North dichotomy and integrate the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  7
    A Principled Account of AMR Global Governance Solidarity, Subsidiarity, and Stewardship.Thana C. de Campos-Rudinsky - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (1):58-63.
    This commentary defines what shared yet differentiated ethical responsibilities to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR) mean, by introducing a threefold principled account of AMR global governance. It argues that the principles of solidarity, subsidiarity, and stewardship can be especially helpful for further justifying some of the universal, differentiated, and individual responsibilities that Van Katwyk et al propose. The upshot of my threefold principled account of AMR global governance is a less ambitious AMR treaty, one that can only justify (i) universal duties (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  13
    Governing the Global Antimicrobial Commons: Introduction to Special Issue.Steven J. Hoffman, Julian Savulescu, Alberto Giubilini, Claas Kirchhelle, Susan Rogers Van Katwyk, Isaac Weldon, Brooke Campus, Mark Harrison, Hannah Maslen & Angela McLean - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (1):1-8.
    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest public health crises of our time. The natural biological process that causes microbes to become resistant to antimicrobial drugs presents a complex social challenge requiring more effective and sustainable management of the global antimicrobial commons—the common pool of effective antimicrobials. This special issue of Health Care Analysis explores the potential of two legal approaches—one long-term and one short-term—for managing the antimicrobial commons. The first article explores the lessons for antimicrobial resistance that can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  13
    Exploring Models for an International Legal Agreement on the Global Antimicrobial Commons: Lessons from Climate Agreements.Susan Rogers Van Katwyk, Alberto Giubilini, Claas Kirchhelle, Isaac Weldon, Mark Harrison, Angela McLean, Julian Savulescu & Steven J. Hoffman - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (1):25-46.
    An international legal agreement governing the global antimicrobial commons would represent the strongest commitment mechanism for achieving collective action on antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Since AMR has important similarities to climate change—both are common pool resource challenges that require massive, long-term political commitments—the first article in this special issue draws lessons from various climate agreements that could be applicable for developing a grand bargain on AMR. We consider the similarities and differences between the Paris Climate Agreement and current governance structures for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  20.  11
    Making Use of Existing International Legal Mechanisms to Manage the Global Antimicrobial Commons: Identifying Legal Hooks and Institutional Mandates.Susan Rogers Van Katwyk, Isaac Weldon, Alberto Giubilini, Claas Kirchhelle, Mark Harrison, Angela McLean, Julian Savulescu & Steven J. Hoffman - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (1):9-24.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an urgent threat to global public health and development. Mitigating this threat requires substantial short-term action on key AMR priorities. While international legal agreements are the strongest mechanism for ensuring collaboration among countries, negotiating new international agreements can be a slow process. In the second article in this special issue, we consider whether harnessing existing international legal agreements offers an opportunity to increase collective action on AMR goals in the short-term. We highlight ten AMR priorities and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. More Carrots, Less Sticks: Encouraging Good Stewardship in the Global Antimicrobial Commons.Cristian Timmermann - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 31 (1):53-57.
    Time-tested commons characterize by having instituted sanctioning mechanisms that are sensitive to the circumstances and motivations of non-compliers. As a proposed Global Antimicrobial Commons cannot cost-effectively develop sanctioning mechanisms that are consistently sensitive to the circumstances of the global poor, I suggest concentrating on establishing a wider set of incentives that encourages both compliance and participation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues