Year:

  1.  6
    Valuing Healthcare Improvement: Implicit Norms, Explicit Normativity, and Human Agency.Stacy M. Carter - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):189-205.
    I argue that greater attention to human agency and normativity in both researching and practicing service improvement may be one strategy for enhancing improvement science, illustrating with examples from cancer screening. Improvement science tends to deliberately avoid explicit normativity, for paradigmatically coherent reasons. But there are good reasons to consider including explicit normativity in thinking about improvement. Values and moral judgements are central to social life, so an adequate account of social life must include these elements. And improvement itself is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  4
    Improvement Science Meets Improvement Scholarship: Reframing Research for Better Healthcare.Alan Cribb - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):109-123.
    In this editorial essay I explore the possibilities of ‘improvement scholarship’ in order to set the scene for the theme of, and the other papers in, this issue. I contrast a narrow conception of quality improvement research with a much broader and more inclusive conception, arguing that we should greatly extend the existing dialogue between ‘problem-solving’ and ‘critical’ currents in improvement research. I have in mind the potential for building a much larger conversation between those people in ‘improvement science’ who (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  3
    “ Don’T Mind the Gap!” Reflections on Improvement Science as a Paradigm.Trenholme Junghans - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):124-139.
    Responding to this issue’s invitation to bring new disciplinary insights to the field of improvement science, this article takes as its starting point one of the field’s guiding metaphors: the imperative to “mind the gap”. Drawing on insights from anthropology, history, and philosophy, the article reflects on the origins and implications of this metaphoric imperative, and suggests some ways in which it might be in tension with the means and ends of improvement. If the industrial origins of improvement science in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    Showing the Unsayable: Participatory Visual Approaches and the Constitution of ‘Patient Experience’ in Healthcare Quality Improvement.Constantina Papoulias - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):171-188.
    This article considers the strengths and potential contributions of participatory visual methods for healthcare quality improvement research. It argues that such approaches may enable us to expand our understanding of ‘patient experience’ and of its potential for generating new knowledge for health systems. In particular, they may open up dimensions of people’s engagement with services and treatments which exceed both the declarative nature of responses to questionnaires and the narrative sequencing of self reports gathered through qualitative interviewing. I will suggest (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  13
    Scientism in Medical Education and the Improvement of Medical Care: Opioids, Competencies, and Social Accountability.Lynette Reid - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):155-170.
    Scientism in medical education distracts educators from focusing on the content of learning; it focuses attention instead on individual achievement and validity in its measurement. I analyze the specific form that scientism takes in medicine and in medical education. The competencies movement attempts to challenge old “scientistic” views of the role of physicians, but in the end it has invited medical educators to focus on validity in the measurement of individual performance for attitudes and skills that medicine resists conceptualizing as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  15
    History Matters: The Critical Contribution of Historical Analysis to Contemporary Health Policy and Health Care.Sally Sheard - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):140-154.
    History is popular with health policymakers, if the regularity with which they invoke historical anecdotes to support policy change is used as an indicator. Yet the ways in which they ‘use’ history vary enormously, as does its impact. This paper explores, from the perspective of a UK academic historian, the development of ‘applied’ history in health policy. It draws on personal experience of different types and levels of engagement with policymakers, and highlights mechanisms through which this dialogue and partnership can (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  13
    If You’Re a Rawlsian, How Come You’Re So Close to Utilitarianism and Intuitionism? A Critique of Daniels’s Accountability for Reasonableness.Gabriele Badano - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):1-16.
    Norman Daniels’s theory of ‘accountability for reasonableness’ is an influential conception of fairness in healthcare resource allocation. Although it is widely thought that this theory provides a consistent extension of John Rawls’s general conception of justice, this paper shows that accountability for reasonableness has important points of contact with both utilitarianism and intuitionism, the main targets of Rawls’s argument. My aim is to demonstrate that its overlap with utilitarianism and intuitionism leaves accountability for reasonableness open to damaging critiques. The important (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  10
    Why Health and Social Care Support for People with Long-Term Conditions Should Be Oriented Towards Enabling Them to Live Well.Vikki A. Entwistle, Alan Cribb & John Owens - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):48-65.
    There are various reasons why efforts to promote “support for self-management” have rarely delivered the kinds of sustainable improvements in healthcare experiences, health and wellbeing that policy leaders internationally have hoped for. This paper explains how the basis of failure is in some respects built into the ideas that underpin many of these efforts. When support for self-management is narrowly oriented towards educating and motivating patients to adopt the behaviours recommended for disease control, it implicitly reflects and perpetuates limited and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  4
    How Much Care is Enough? Carer’s Guilt and Bergsonian Time.Will Johncock - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):94-107.
    Despite devoting their time to another person’s needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the “enough” of anything, what is at stake is that thing’s quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measure the role, concerns regarding whether enough care is being provided often focus on what constitutes enough time as a carer. In exploring this aspect of the carer’s experience, two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  11
    Beyond Fair Benefits: Reconsidering Exploitation Arguments Against Organ Markets.Julian J. Koplin - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):33-47.
    One common objection to establishing regulated live donor organ markets is that such markets would be exploitative. Perhaps surprisingly, exploitation arguments against organ markets have been widely rejected in the philosophical literature on the subject. It is often argued that concerns about exploitation should be addressed by increasing the price paid to organ sellers, not by banning the trade outright. I argue that this analysis rests on a particular conception of exploitation, and outline two additional ways that the charge of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  7
    Examining the Social Benefits Principle in Research with Human Participants.David B. Resnik - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):66-80.
    The idea that research with human participants should benefit society has become firmly entrenched in various regulations, policies, and guidelines, but there has been little in-depth analysis of this ethical principle in the bioethics literature. In this paper, I distinguish between strong and weak versions and the social benefits principle and examine six arguments for it. I argue that while it is always ethically desirable for research with human subjects to offer important benefits to society, the reasonable expectation of substantial (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  4
    Individualised Claims of Conscience, Clinical Judgement and Best Interests.Stephen W. Smith - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):81-93.
    Conscience and conscientious objections are important issues in medical law and ethics. However, discussions tend to focus on a particular type of conscience-based claim. These types of claims are based upon predictable, generalizable rules in which an individual practitioner objects to what is otherwise standard medical treatment. However, not all conscience based claims are of this type. There are other claims which are based not on an objection to a treatment in general but in individual cases. In other words, these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  6
    Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):17-32.
    There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue—while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues