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  1.  25
    Biotechnology and Human Dignity.Emmanuel Agius - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):155-184.
    The precise meaning of “human dignity” is increasingly being questioned in ethics and law. Is human dignity an adequate guide to policymaking in today’s biotechnological era? This article is an attempt to answer this thorny issue. The emergence of the concept of human dignity as a key point of reference for the regulation of modern science and technology in the European Union is evaluated. The main contribution of this article is to prove that in EU Directives and Recommendations, human dignity (...)
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  2.  6
    Peter Singer Under Fire.Emily Beckwith - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):235-238.
    Peter Singer Under Fire Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 235-238 DOI 10.1558/hrge.v17i2.235 Authors Emily Beckwith Journal Human Reproduction & Genetic Ethics Online ISSN 2043-0469 Print ISSN 1028-7825 Journal Volume Volume 17 Journal Issue Volume 17, Number 2 / 2011.
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  3.  5
    Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics.Emily Beckwith - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):239-242.
    Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 239-242 DOI 10.1558/hrge.v17i2.239 Authors Emily Beckwith Journal Human Reproduction & Genetic Ethics Online ISSN 2043-0469 Print ISSN 1028-7825 Journal Volume Volume 17 Journal Issue Volume 17, Number 2 / 2011.
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  4.  4
    Engineering Innovation in Healthcare.W. Richard Bowen - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):204-221.
    Engineering makes profound contributions to our health. Many of these contributions benefit whole populations, such as clean water and sewage treatment, buildings, dependable sources of energy, efficient harvesting and storage of food, and pharmaceutical manufacture. Thus, ethical assessment of these and other engineering activities has often emphasized benefits to communities. This is in contrast to medical ethics, which has tended to emphasize the individual patient affected by a doctor’s actions. However, technological innovation is leading to an entanglement of the activities, (...)
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  5.  4
    Unity in Diversity.David Fieldsend - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):222-234.
    This article, taken from a presentation to the 2011 European Association of Centres of Medical Ethics annual conference, draws on both national legislation in European states and the Conventions of the Council of Europe as well as EU instruments such the Opinions of the European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies and the Charter of Fundamental Rights to examine the current state of national and regional diversity in approaches to key bioethics issues and examines its evolution with reference (...)
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  6.  8
    Bioethics and the Demise of the Concept of Human Dignity.David G. Kirchhoffer - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):141-154.
    The rise of “dignity talk” has led to the concept of human dignity being criticized in recent years. Some critics argue that human dignity must either be something we have or something we acquire. Others argue that there is no such thing as human dignity and people really mean something else when they appeal to it. Both “dignity talk” and the criticisms arise from a problematic conception of medical ethics as a legalistic, procedural techne. A retrieval of hermeneutical ethics, by (...)
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  7.  9
    Human Dignity and the Profoundly Disabled.Pia Matthews - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):185-203.
    One challenge to the concept of human dignity is that it is a rootless notion invoked simply to mask inequalities that inevitably exist between human beings. This privileging of humans is speciesist and its weak point is the profoundly disabled human being. This article argues that far from being a weak point, the profoundly disabled person is a source of strength and witness to the intrinsic dignity that all human beings have by virtue of being human. The disabled represent the (...)
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  8.  2
    Ediorial.Trevor Stammers - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):139 - 140.
    Ediorial Content Type Journal Article Category Editorial Pages 139-140 DOI 10.1558/hrge.v17i2.139 Authors Trevor Stammers, St Mary’s University College, London Journal Human Reproduction & Genetic Ethics Online ISSN 2043-0469 Print ISSN 1028-7825 Journal Volume Volume 17 Journal Issue Volume 17, Number 2 / 2011.
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  9.  22
    Unsafe Motherhood: Mayan Maternal Mortality and Subjectivity in Post-War Guatemala, by Nicole S. Berry. [REVIEW]Janet Baldwin - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):137-139.
  10. BERRY, Nicole S., Unsafe Motherhood: Mayan Maternal Mortality and Subjectivity in Post-War Guatemala.Janet Baldwin - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):137.
     
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  11.  1
    Courts, Legislators and Human Embryo Research: Lessons From Ireland.William Binchy - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):7-27.
    When it comes to the matter of human embryo research law plays a crucial role in its development by helping to set the boundaries of what may be done, the sanctions for acting outside those boundaries and the rights and responsibilities of key parties. Nevertheless, the philosophical challenges raised by human embryo research, even with the best will of all concerned, may prove too great for satisfactory resolution through the legal process. Taking as its focus the position of Ireland, this (...)
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  12.  42
    Doubts About a Classic Defence of Abortion.Jo Difford - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):122-129.
    Professor Judith Jarvis Thomson’s seminal paper “A Defence of Abortion” published in 1971 has formed part of higher education syllabi for decades. In the paper Thomson criticizes one of the fundamental arguments against abortion, that is, the right of the foetus to life by denying that the foetus is a person. This article argues that her thought experiments do not compare to the reality of abortion and focuses on the influence of the paper on arguments concerning personhood.
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  13.  3
    The Commons Science and Technology Committee Inquiry Into Hybrid Embryo Research 2007: Credible, Reliable and Objective?Pauline Gately - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):84-109.
    In 2006 the Government issued a White Paper in which it proposed a ban on human-animal embryo research pending greater clarity on its potential. The Commons Select Committee on Science and Technology initiated an Inquiry and concluded that such research was necessary and should be permitted immediately. The Government agreed and this is reflected in revised legislation. The Government has issued guidelines on the gathering and use of scientific advice and evidence, designed to ensure that these are “credible, reliable and (...)
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  14.  68
    Believing in the Dignity of Human Embryos.Michael Hauskeller - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):53-65.
    After showing that despite being inherently flawed the concept of dignity cannot be replaced without loss by ethical principles such as “respect for persons,” it is argued that, if dignity be not understood as dignitas, but as bonitas, which emphasizes connectedness rather than excellence and to which the proper response is not respect, but awe, there is no reason not to ascribe it to the human embryo. The question whether or not human embryos have dignity can then be answered in (...)
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  15.  6
    Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy and Politics, by Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger. [REVIEW]Matt James - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):140-143.
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  16.  11
    Humanity's End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement, by Nicholas Agar. [REVIEW]Matt James - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):133-136.
  17. AGAR, Nicholas, Humanity's End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement.Matt James - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):133.
     
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  18. MORENO, Jonathan D. And Sam BERGER, The Complete Guide to IVF: An Insider's Guide to Fertility Clinics and Treatments.Matt James - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):140.
     
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  19.  12
    The "Special Status" of the Human Embryo in the United Kingdom: An Exploration of the Use of Language in Public Policy.David Jones - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):66-83.
    There is an apparent gap between public policy on embryo research in the United Kingdom and its ostensible justification. The rationale is respect for the “special status” of the embryo, but the policy actively promotes research in which embryos are destroyed. Richard Harries argues that this is consistent because, the “special status” of the human embryo is less than the absolute status of persons. However, this intermediate moral status does no evident work in decisions relating to the human embryo. Rather, (...)
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  20.  22
    The Ethics of Commercial Surrogate Mothering: A Response to Casey Humbyrd.Peter Omonzejele - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):110-121.
    This article critically examines the argument advanced by Casey Humbyrd in support of international commercial surrogate mothering. It finds her arguments unconvincing especially at the point of implementation. This is because the author was unable to demonstrate how regulation and her notion of fair compensation would not lead to undue inducement and exploitation in resource-poor settings where urgent needs often exist. In fact, the argument advanced in this article is that commercial surrogate mothering cannot but be exploitative in so far (...)
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  21.  5
    Embryo Research in Italy: The Bioethical and Biojuridical Debate.Laura Palazzani - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):28-39.
    This article deals with the discussion on the status of the human embryo in Italy on a philosophical, socio-ethical and juridical level before, during and after the law. Different lines of thought are outlined and critically discussed. The focus is the debate over the so-called embryonic stem cells, pointing out the ethical premises and the juridical implications. The regulations in Italy are analysed in detail, referring to legislation and jurisprudence. In particular the author includes evidence for the debate after the (...)
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  22.  10
    The Law and Politics of Embryo Research in America.O. Snead - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):40-52.
    The moral, legal, and public policy dispute over embryonic stem cell research is the most prominent issue in American public bioethics of the past decade. The primary moral question raised by the practice of embryonic stem cell research is whether it is defensible to disaggregate living human embryos in order to derive pluripotent cells for purposes of basic research that may someday yield regenerative therapies. This essay will explain the legal and political dimensions of the embryonic stem cell debate as (...)
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  23.  7
    Conscience - A Very Short Introduction, by Paul Strohm. [REVIEW]Trevor Stammers - 2011 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (1):130-132.
    Review of book on the nature of conscience and history of development of ideas about it.
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