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  1.  5
    Making Sense of Heidegger’s ‘Phenomenology of the Inconspicuous’ or Inapparent.Jason W. Alvis - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):211-238.
    In Heidegger’s last seminar, which was in Zähringen in 1973, he introduces what he called a “phenomenology of the inconspicuous”. Despite scholars’ occasional references to this “approach” over the last 40 years, this approach of Heidegger’s has gone largely under investigated in secondary literature. This article introduces three different, although not necessarily conflicting ways in which these sparse references to inconspicuousness can be interpreted: The a priori of appearance can never be brought to manifestation, and the unscheinbar is interwoven with (...)
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  2.  1
    Words That Reveal: Jean-Yves Lacoste and the Experience of God.Robyn Horner - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):169-192.
    Much of the contemporary discussion of religion seems to do away with the very possibility of revelation. In this article, I use Lacoste’s phenomenology of la parole to rethink a theology of revelation in terms of God’s personal self-giving in experience. After examining Lacoste’s views of the relationship between philosophy and theology, his liturgical reduction and what this means for an understanding of experience and knowledge, and his thought of la parole more broadly, I give critical consideration to how he (...)
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  3.  20
    The Joy of Desire: Understanding Levinas’s Desire of the Other as Gift.Sarah Horton - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):193-210.
    In this paper, I argue that if we understand Levinas’s Desire of the Other as gift, we can understand it as joyful—that is, as celebratory. After presenting Levinas’s conception of Desire, I consider his claim, found in Otherwise than Being, that the self is a hostage to the Other, and I contend that, paradoxical as it may seem, being a hostage to the Other is actually liberating. Then, drawing on insights Richard Kearney offers in Reimagining the Sacred, I argue for (...)
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  4.  21
    On Nothing: Heidegger and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):239-268.
    Two major twentieth century philosophers, of East and West, for whom the nothing is a significant concept are Nishida Kitarō and Martin Heidegger. Nishida’s basic concept is the absolute nothing upon which the being of all is predicated. Heidegger, on the other hand, thematizes the nothing as the ulterior aspect of being. Both are responding to Western metaphysics that tends to substantialize being and dichotomize the real. Ironically, however, while Nishida regarded Heidegger as still trapped within the confines of Western (...)
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  5.  3
    Review of Phenomenology and the Arts, Ed. Peter R. Costello and Licia Carlson. [REVIEW]Christine Rojcewicz - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):289-294.
    Through an exploration of the arts, Phenomenology and the Arts traces the relationship between phenomenology qua historical movement and qua descriptive method. Serving as an artistic undertaking, the phenomenological method itself echoes its content when describing artistic matters such as painting, drama, literature, and music. After establishing the thematics and structure of the volume, contributors analyze in rich and groundbreaking ways specifically Kant, Hegel, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Derrida, and works of art, including select jazz composers, the visual arts of (...)
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  6.  17
    Making Sense of the Lived Body and the Lived World: Meaning and Presence in Husserl, Derrida and Noë.Jacob Martin Rump - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):141-167.
    I argue that Husserl’s transcendental account of the role of the lived body in sense-making is a precursor to Alva Noë’s recent work on the enactive, embodied mind, specifically his notion of “sensorimotor knowledge” as a form of embodied sense-making that avoids representationalism and intellectualism. Derrida’s deconstructive account of meaning—developed largely through a critique of Husserl—relies on the claim that meaning is structured through the complication of the “interiority” of consciousness by an “outside,” and thus might be thought to lend (...)
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  7.  5
    The Real of the Rabble: Žižek and the Historical Truth of the Hegelo-Lacanian Dialectic.Zachary Tavlin - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):269-288.
    In this essay I attempt to answer a fundamental question about Žižek’s heterodox reading of Hegel’s dialectic: What project sustains this reading in the first place? That is, what is at stake for Žižek himself? The purpose of this essay is to develop in this fashion a reading of Žižek, although not one that is necessarily meant to compete against other alternatives. My argument, then, is that Žižek’s ontological and hermeneutical project is ultimately political, that when Žižek says we need (...)
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  8.  3
    Book Review of Adrian Johnston’s, Irrepressible Truth : On Lacan’s “The Freudian Thing”. [REVIEW]Gregory Trotter - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):295-299.
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  9.  10
    Against Levinas’ Messianic Politics: A Polemic.Jason Caro - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):1-21.
    Blamelessly, most commentators attempt to deduce the political theory of Levinas from his interhuman philosophy. In contrast to the perceived state of ethical life in contemporary politics, the attractiveness of the asymmetric obligations owed by the ego to the Other make the deductive project seem urgent. But an inductive analysis of Levinas’ philosophy yields troubling prerequisites, including rigorous theocracy and a form of sociability in which no epistemological clarity is permitted that could determine in situ interpersonal duties. Such unfamiliar politics (...)
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  10.  17
    Nietzsche Beyond Correlationism: Meillassoux’s History of Modern Philosophy.C. J. Davies - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):81-93.
    Quentin Meillassoux’s speculative materialism rests on the historical claim that European philosophy since Kant is “correlationist” in its denial that thought can know being as it is in itself rather than merely for us. But though the claim is central to Meillassoux, it has not been much explored in the literature on his work. This paper argues that Nietzsche does not fit so easily into Meillassoux’s story. Though there are certain superficially correlationist elements in Nietzsche’s thought, part of his core (...)
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  11.  9
    The Violence of the Ethical Encounter: Listening to the Suffering Subject as a Speaking Body.Dorothée Legrand - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):43-64.
    How does the clinical encounter work? To tackle this question, the present study centers on the paradigmatic clinical encounter, namely, psychoanalysis, paradigmatic in that it is structured by the encounter itself. Our question thus becomes: how does the clinical encounter work, when its only modality is speech? By reading Jacques Lacan and Emmanuel Levinas together, we better identify how speech sets up as subjects those who address one another and how this subjectivation touches the suffering body specifically. In this framework, (...)
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  12.  8
    Process as Reality: Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Approach to the Ethical.Michael J. Matthis - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):23-41.
    This paper makes the point that Kierkegaard’s ideas concerning individuality cannot be understood clearly without placing them in the context of what I am calling ontological isolation. This means the radical deprivation by selfhood of every aspect of reality, to the point where not even the possibility or illusion of reality is available to the self. In this context the self is required to become itself, forming itself in and out of its own absolute nothingness, ontological destitution, or wrongness. With (...)
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  13.  5
    Gendlin’s Experiential Phenomenology of “Saying”.Robert C. Scharff - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):111-121.
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  14.  8
    Thinking Emergence as Interaffecting: Approaching and Contextualizing Eugene Gendlin’s Process Model.Donata Schoeller & Neil Dunaetz - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):123-140.
    Prior to A Process Model, Gendlin’s theoretical and practical work focused on the interfacing of bodily-felt meaningfulness and symbolization. In A Process Model, Gendlin does something much wider and more philosophically primary. The hermeneutic and pragmatist distinction between the concept of experience, on the one hand, and actual experiential process, on the other, becomes for Gendlin the methodological basis for a radical reconceptualization of the body. Wittgenstein’s formulation of “meaning” as “language-use in situations” is spelled out by Gendlin in embodied (...)
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  15.  29
    What is the Body Without Organs? Machine and Organism in Deleuze and Guattari.Daniel Smith - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):95-110.
    In the two volumes which make up Capitalism and Schizophrenia, Deleuze and Guattari propose new concepts of “machine” and “organism.” The problem of the relationship between machines and organisms has a long philosophical history, and this essay treats their work as a contribution to this debate. It is argued that their solution to this problem is found in their difficult concept of the “body without organs,” a concept that is given some much-needed clarification in the essay. The first section details (...)
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  16.  8
    Evolution and the Meaning of Being: Heidegger, Jonas and Nihilism.Lawrence Vogel - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):65-79.
    Hans Jonas accuses Heidegger of “never bring[ing] his question about Being into correlation with the testimony of our physical and biological evolution.” Neither the early nor later Heidegger has a “philosophy of nature,” Jonas charges, because Naturphilosophie demands a new concept of matter, a monistic account of cosmogony and evolution, and the grounding of ethical responsibility for future generations in an ontological “first principle.” Jonas’s ontological rethinking of Darwinism allows him to overcome the nihilism that a mechanistic interpretation of evolution (...)
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