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  1.  5
    Collective intentionality and the further challenge of collective free improvisation.Lucia Angelino - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):49-65.
    The kind of collective improvisation attained by free jazz at the beginning of the sixties appears interesting from the perspective of contemporary debates on collective intentionality for several reasons. The most notable of these, is that it holds a mirror up to what analytical philosophers of action identify as “the complexly interwoven sets of collective intentions” that make a group more than the sum of its parts. But at the same time, free jazz poses a challenge to these philosophical theories (...)
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  2.  11
    Affectivity and the Distinction Between Minimal and Narrative Self.Anna Bortolan - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):67-84.
    In the contemporary phenomenological literature it has been argued that it is possible to distinguish between two forms of selfhood: the “minimal” and “narrative” self. This paper discusses a claim which is central to this account, namely that the minimal and narrative self complement each other but are fundamentally distinct dimensions. In particular, I challenge the idea that while the presence of a minimal self is a condition of possibility for the emergence of a narrative self, the dynamics which characterise (...)
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  3.  3
    Review of Penelope Deutscher, Foucault’s Futures: A Critique of Reproductive Reason: Columbia University Press, New York, 2017. [REVIEW]Sarah K. Hansen - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):113-119.
    In Foucault’s Futures: A Critique of Reproductive Reason, Penelope Deutscher explores the “suspended reserves” in Foucault’s writing, “absent concepts and problems [that] can be given a shape in potentially transformative ways within philosophical frameworks which have omitted them Deutscher.” Deutscher pays particular attention to neglected figures of children in Foucault’s works and she develops the notion of “responsibilization,” processes of dividing populations into legible and illegible reproductive moral agents. This review of Foucault’s Futures considers Deutscher’s methodological innovation as it relates (...)
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  4.  17
    From “Block-Things” to “Time-Things”: Merleau-Ponty’s temporal ontology in part two of the phenomenology of perception.David Morris - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):1-19.
    Scholars such as Renaud Barbara and Bernhard Waldenfels and Regula Giuliani have emphasized time’s central role in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and Michael Kelly has shown how the Phenomenology’s “Temporality” chapter already broaches his later ontological concerns. I deepen our understanding of this temporal–ontological nexus by showing how Merleau-Ponty’s temporal ontology in fact erupts even earlier in the Phenomenology, as an underlying theme that unifies part two, on “The Perceived World,” as leading into the “Temporality” chapter. I do this via a close (...)
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  5.  8
    Bergson’s philosophical method: At the edge of phenomenology and mathematics.David M. Peña-Guzmán - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):85-101.
    This article highlights the mathematical structure of Henri Bergson’s method. While Bergson has been historically interpreted as an anti-scientific and irrationalist philosopher, he modeled his philosophical methodology on the infinitesimal calculus developed by Leibniz and Newton in the seventeenth century. His philosophy, then, rests on the science of number, at least from a methodological standpoint. By looking at how he conscripted key mathematical concepts into his philosophy, this article invites us to re-imagine Bergson’s place in the history of Western philosophy.
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  6.  8
    Jean Wahl’s unassailable heritage.Guillaume St-Laurent - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):103-111.
    Despite his unassailable heritage, the passionate thinker to whom Levinas dedicated Totalité et infini has today nearly been forgotten outside France. This forgetting is the shared premise of two books published in recent years. The first is William C. Hackett and Jeffrey Hanson’s edition and translation of Wahl’s Existence humaine et transcendance : Human Existence and Transcendence, and the second is a volume of selections from Wahl’s philosophical writings edited by Alan D. Schrift and Ian Alexander Moore: Jean Wahl: Transcendence (...)
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  7.  84
    Intercorporeity and the first-person plural in Merleau-Ponty.Philip J. Walsh - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (1):21-47.
    A theory of the first-person plural occupies a unique place in philosophical investigations into intersubjectivity and social cognition. In order for the referent of the first-person plural—“the We”—to come into existence, it seems there must be a shared ground of communicative possibility, but this requires a non-circular explanation of how this ground could be shared in the absence of a pre-existing context of communicative conventions. Margaret Gilbert’s and John Searle’s theories of collective intentionality capture important aspects of the We, but (...)
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