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  1.  18
    Narrative Identity and Phenomenology.Jakub Čapek - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):359-375.
    Narrative identity theory in some of its influential variants makes three fundamental assumptions. First, it focuses on personal identity primarily in terms of selfhood. Second, it argues that personal identity is to be understood as the unity of one’s life as it develops over time. And finally, it states that the unity of a life is articulated, by the very person itself, in the form of a story, be it explicit or implicit. The article focuses on different contemporary phenomenological appraisals (...)
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  2.  4
    Rudolf Makkreel: Orientation and Judgment in Hermeneutics.Wayne Froman - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):411-418.
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  3.  2
    The Notion of Aesthetic Freedom in Contemporary German Philosophy: Christoph Menke’s The Power of Art and Martin Seel’s Active Passivity.Thomas Hilgers - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):425-428.
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  4.  9
    J. Colin McQuillan: Immanuel Kant: The Very Idea of a Critique of Pure Reason.Stephen Howard - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):403-410.
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  5.  3
    Radegundis, Stolze, John, Stanley, and Larisa Cercel : Translational Hermeneutics: The First Symposium.Kharmandar Mohammad Ali - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):419-423.
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  6.  6
    Ryan Coyne: Heidegger’s Confessions: The Remains of Saint Augustine in Being and Time and Beyond.Jeffrey L. Kosky - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):395-401.
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  7.  7
    Heidegger’s Philosophical Botany.Tristan Moyle - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):377-394.
    Heidegger argues that for being x to count as ‘alive’ it must satisfy three metaphysical conditions. It must be capable of engaging in active behaviour with a form of intentional directedness that offers to us a “sphere of transposition” into which we can intelligibly “transpose ourselves.” Heidegger’s discussion of these conditions, as they apply to the being of animals, is well-known. But, if his argument is sound, they ought also to apply to the being of plants. Heidegger, unfortunately, does not (...)
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  8.  7
    Husserl and Queer Theory.Lanei M. Rodemeyer - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):311-334.
    In spite of a history wherein queer theory has openly rejected phenomenology, phenomenology has gained increasing interest amongst queer theorists. However, Husserl’s phenomenology is often marginalized in attempts to integrate queer theory with phenomenology, and when Husserl is addressed specifically, his work is often treated superficially or even misrepresented. Given this, my first goal is to demonstrate how Husserl’s work is already open to positions considered fundamental to queer theory, and that Husserl is often explicitly arguing for these positions himself. (...)
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  9.  5
    Goethe and the Study of Life: A Comparison with Husserl and Simmel.Elke Weik - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):335-357.
    In the paper at hand I introduce Goethe’s ontology and methodology for the study of life as an alternative to current theories. ‘Life,’ in its individual, social and/or pan-natural form, has been a recurring topic in the social sciences for the last two centuries and may currently experience a renaissance, if we are to believe Scott Lash. Goethe’s approach is of particular interest because he formulated it as one of the first critical responses to the nascent discipline of biology. It (...)
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  10.  9
    Husserl on Symbolic Technologies and Meaning-Constitution: A Critical Inquiry.Peter Woelert - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):289-310.
    This paper reconstructs and critically analyzes Husserl’s philosophical engagement with symbolic technologies—those material artifacts and cultural devices that serve to aid, structure and guide processes of thinking. Identifying and exploring a range of tensions in Husserl’s conception of symbolic technologies, I argue that this conception is limited in several ways, and particularly with regard to the task of accounting for the more constructive role these technologies play in processes of meaning-constitution. At the same time, this paper shows that a critical (...)
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  11.  3
    Review Article of Michael Staudigl’s Phänomenologie der Gewalt.James G. Hart - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):269-288.
    This book is a rounded well-informed study of violence, especially from a hermeneutical and social-studies perspective. It is relevant to peace studies. It raises key issues about the phenomenology of the person, of violence, of the foundations of ethics. Although it tends to skirt normative phenomenological, eidetic as well as moral issues they are always insistently on the edge of the rich discussions philosophical-hermeneutical issues and contemporary writings on these matters.
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  12.  20
    The Concept of Violence in the Work of Hannah Arendt.Annabel Herzog - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):165-179.
    Arendt claimed that violence is not part of the political because it is instrumental. Her position has generated a vast corpus of scholarship, most of which falls into the context of the realist-liberal divide. Taking these discussions as a starting point, this essay engages with violence in Arendt’s work from a different perspective. Its interest lies not in Arendt’s theory of violence in the world, but in the function that violence performed in her work, namely, in the constitutive role of (...)
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  13.  5
    Equitable Relief as a Relay Between Juridical and Biopower: The Case of School Desegregation.Gordon Hull - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):225-248.
    The present paper looks at the intersection of juridical and biopower in the U.S. Supreme Court’s school desegregation cases. These cases generally deploy “equitable relief” as a relay between the juridicially-specified injury of segregation and the biopolitical mandates of integration, allowing broad-based biopolitical remedies for juridically identified problems. This strategy enabled the Courts to negotiate between these forms of power. The analysis here thus suggests the continued relevance of juridical power, and also the limits of Foucault’s own analysis, which suggested (...)
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  14.  14
    Beyond the Politics of Reception: Jacques Rancière and the Politics of Art.Matthew Lampert - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):181-200.
    Jacques Rancière’s work has become a major reference point for discussions of art and politics. However, while Rancière’s negative theses are becoming widespread and well understood, his positive thesis is still poorly understood, owing partly to Rancière’s own formulation of the issue. I first clarify Rancière’s account of the links between politics and art. I then explore a gap in this account; Rancière has stuck too closely to a politics of art’s reception. I argue for a politics of art production, (...)
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  15.  5
    Bergson, Human Rights, and Joy.Alexandre Lefebvre - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):201-223.
    This article examines Henri Bergson’s conception of human rights in The Two Sources of Morality and Religion. I claim that he provides an original view of human rights. Rather than understand human rights primarily as an institution to protect all human beings from serious social, legal, and political abuse, Bergson conceives of them as a medium of personal transformation. In particular, I argue that for him the true potential of human rights is to initiate all human beings into a way (...)
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  16.  8
    Violence and Existence: An Examination of Carl Schmitt’s Philosophy.James R. Mensch - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):249-268.
    This article examines the concept of existence underlying Carl Schmitt’s political philosophy—a concept is that Heidegger largely shares. Can such a conception do justice to our political life? Or is it, in fact, inimical to it? The crucial issue here is that of political identity and the role that violence plays in its formation. The article concludes by examining Jan Patočka’s account of existence as motion and applying it to our political commitments.
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  17.  16
    Arendt’s Genealogy of Thinking.Justin Pack - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):151-164.
    This paper presents what I will call Arendt’s genealogy of thinking. My purpose in doing so is to strengthen Arendt’s critique of thoughtlessness which I believe is both a powerful, but underappreciated analytic tool and a consistent, but under-examined thread that occurs throughout Arendt’s oeuvre. To do so I revisit her phenomenology of thinking and the distinction between thinking and cognition she introduces in her last, unfinished work, The Life of the Mind. When read alongside the genealogy of action in (...)
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  18.  17
    Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology in the Light of Kant’s Third Critique and Schelling’s Real-Idealismus.Sebastian Gardner - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):5-25.
    In this paper I offer a selective, systematic rather than historical account of Merleau-Ponty’s highly complex relation to classical German philosophy, focussing on issues which bear on the question of his relation to transcendentalism and naturalism. I argue that the concerns which define his project in Phenomenology of Perception are fundamentally those of transcendental philosophy, and that Merleau-Ponty’s disagreements with Kant, and the position he arrives at in The Visible and the Invisible, are helpfully viewed in light of issues which (...)
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  19.  13
    Was Merleau-Ponty a ‘Transcendental’ Phenomenologist?Andrew Inkpin - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):27-47.
    Whether or not Merleau-Ponty’s version of phenomenology should be considered a form of ‘transcendental’ philosophy is open to debate. Although the Phenomenology of Perception presents his position as a transcendental one, many of its features—such as its exploitation of empirical science—might lead to doubt that it can be. This paper considers whether Merleau-Ponty meets what I call the ‘transcendentalist challenge’ of defining and grounding claims of a distinctive transcendental kind. It begins by highlighting three features—the absolute ego, the pure phenomenal (...)
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  20.  14
    Introduction: Merleau-Ponty’s Gordian Knot.Andrew Inkpin & Jack Reynolds - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):1-3.
  21.  16
    Measurement as Transcendental–Empirical Écart: Merleau-Ponty on Deep Temporality.David Morris - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):49-64.
    Merleau-Ponty’s radical reflection conceptualizes the transcendental and the empirical as intertwined, emerging only via an écart. I advance this concept of transcendental empirical écart by studying the problem of measurement in science, in both general and quantum mechanical contexts. Section one analyses scientific problems of measurement, focusing on issues of temporality, to show how measurement entails a transcendental that diverges with the empirical. Section two briefly interprets this result via Merleau-Ponty’s concept of depth, to indicate how measurement reveals a temporality (...)
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  22.  19
    Other Minds Embodied.Søren Overgaard - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):65-80.
    I distinguish three kinds of other minds problems—conceptual, epistemological and empirical. I argue that while Merleau-Ponty believes embodiment helps with tackling the conceptual and epistemological problems, he suggests that it is of no clear use in solving the empirical problem. I sketch some considerations that could lend support to Merleau-Ponty’s claims about the conceptual and epistemological problems, without claiming that these are conclusive. I then proceed to argue that Merleau-Ponty’s take on the empirical problem is essentially correct.
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  23.  26
    Merleau-Ponty's Gordian Knot: Transcendental Phenomenology, Empirical Science, and Naturalism.Jack Reynolds - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):81–104.
    In this paper, I explore a series of fertile ambiguities that Merleau-Ponty's work is premised upon. These ambiguities concern some of the central methodological commitments of his work, in particular his commitment (or otherwise) to transcendental phenomenology and how he transforms that tradition, and his relationship to science and philosophical naturalism and what they suggest about his philosophical methodology. Many engagements with Merleau-Ponty's work that are more ‘analytic’ in orientation either deflate it of its transcendental heritage, or offer a "modest" (...)
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  24.  11
    The Primacy Question in Merleau-Ponty’s Existential Phenomenology.Bryan Smyth - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):127-149.
    This paper takes up the question as to what has primacy within Merleau-Ponty’s existential phenomenology as a way to provide insight into the relation between empirical science and transcendental philosophy within his account of embodiment. Contending that this primacy necessarily pertains to methodology, I show how Kurt Goldstein’s conception of biology provided Merleau-Ponty with a scientific model for approaching human existence holistically in which primacy pertains to the transcendental practice of productive imagination that generates the eidetic organismic Gestalt in terms (...)
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  25.  9
    Toward a Transcendental Account of Creativity. Kant and Merleau-Ponty on the Creative Power of Judgment and Creativity as Institution.Michela Summa - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (1):105-126.
    Several works published in the last decades defend the claim that the concept of creativity should be demystified. With the aim of showing that creativity is not an obscure power owned by only few individuals and free from constraints, authors working at the intersection field between philosophy and cognitive science have notably focused on the structure and evolution of cognitive mechanisms underlying our creative capacities. While taking up the suggestion that we should try not to mystify creativity, this article argues (...)
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