Year:

  1.  4
    Is Religious Liberty Under Threat? An Introduction to the Symposium.Matthew Lee Anderson - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):141-146.
    This introduction surveys the contributions to this issue, which were originally delivered at Oxford University in 2018. By exploring the interconnections and shared motifs, this article suggests that the answer to this symposium is a tentative ‘yes’, but that the sources of those threats arise from the background culture within which these papers are situated.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Gotta Serve Somebody? Religious Liberty, Freedom of Conscience, and Religion as Comprehensive Doctrine.Francis J. Beckwith - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):168-178.
    This article critically assesses an account of religious liberty often associated with several legal and political philosophers: Ronald Dworkin, John Rawls, and Christopher Eisgruber and Lawrence Sager. Calling it the Religion as Comprehensive Doctrine approach, the author contrasts it with an account often attributed to John Locke and the American Founders Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, the Two Sovereigns approach. He argues that the latter provides an important corrective to RCD’s chief weakness: RCD eliminates from our vision those aspects of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  1
    Anglican Establishment: How is It Liberal?Nigel Biggar - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):205-214.
    This article argues that the kind of religious establishment that currently obtains in England is sufficiently liberal in the sense that it accommodates rights to religious freedom and is compatible with political equality. What is more, insofar as it expresses a Christian anthropology, established Anglicanism can generate the ‘thick’ set of virtues necessary to make citizens capable of respecting liberal rights. In the course of defending its thesis, the argument disputes John Rawls’s description of the ‘overlapping consensus’ as one that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  3
    Book Review: Celia Deane-Drummond and Rebecca Artinian-Kaiser (Eds), Theology and Ecology Across the Disciplines: On Care for Our Common Home. [REVIEW]Andrew Bowyer - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):271-274.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    Politics in the Service of Society: A Response to My Interlocutors.Luke Bretherton - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):262-270.
    This article is a response to Hauerwas’s, O’Donovan’s and Muir’s engagements with Christ and the Common Life. Three distinctions that operate in the book are clarified, namely that between formal and informal politics, bottom-up forms of democratic politics and top-down forms of statecraft, and social and political relations. In setting these out, the distinction between public and private is critiqued and two, interrelated moves made in the book are defended. First, that democratic politics precedes and sustains a liberal polity. And (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  3
    Book Review: Terence Keel, Divine Variations: How Christian Thought Became Racial Science. [REVIEW]Andrew T. Draper - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):279-283.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  2
    Religious Freedom and the Churches: Contemporary Challenges in the United States Today1.Richard W. Garnett - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):194-204.
    A crucial, but often overlooked, dimension of the human and constitutional right to religious freedom is the autonomy of religious institutions, associations and societies with respect to matters of governance, doctrine, formation and membership. Although the Supreme Court of the United States has affirmed this autonomy in the context of American constitutional law, it is vulnerable, and even under threat, for a variety of reasons, including a general decline in the health of civil society and mediating associations and a crisis (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  4
    Book Review: Christina Nellist, Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Animal Suffering: Ancient Voices in Modern Theology. [REVIEW]David Grumett - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):289-292.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  2
    Book Review: David S. Robinson, Christ and Revelatory Community in Bonhoeffer’s Reception of Hegel. [REVIEW]Barry Harvey - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):292-294.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  2
    On God and Democracy: Engaging Bretherton’s Christ and the Common Life.Stanley Hauerwas - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):235-242.
    In this article I try to introduce the overall structure of Bretherton’s book Christ and the Common Life by showing how each chapter displays how talk of God and talk of politics are mutually constitutive. In particular I try to show how Bretherton’s ‘case studies’ are arranged to develop his constructive thesis. My paper was not meant to be critical, though I raise the question of whether Bretherton’s project is not a very sophisticated form of Constantinianism—a question that very much (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  2
    Historical Hinterlands for Religious Freedom in the United Kingdom.Mark Hill Qc - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):147-155.
    The peculiar and particular manner in which freedom of religion is promoted and protected in the United Kingdom owes much to the nation’s history. This article offers a highly selective consideration of some of the incidents of history which have shaped or foreshadowed the lived reality of freedom of religion in Britain today. It traces key episodes over past centuries, crudely categorised as the Seven Ages of Religious Liberty.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  2
    Book Review: Harold Heie, with a Foreword by George Marsden, Respectful LGBT Conversations: Seeking Truth, Giving Love, and Modeling Christian Unity. [REVIEW]Karen R. Keen - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):277-279.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  3
    Can Religious Establishment Be Liberal Enough? 1.Cécile Laborde - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):215-223.
    In this article, I aim to do two things. I offer an assessment of religious establishment according to liberal standards. I then ask how this analysis bears on Nigel Biggar’s defence of Anglican establishment. I argue that only some features of Anglican establishment are compatible with the liberal standard of what I call minimal secularism.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  3
    Book Review: John Fea, Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump. [REVIEW]Jenny Leith - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):274-277.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    Book Review: Michael Mawson, Christ Existing as Community: Bonhoeffer’s Ecclesiology. [REVIEW]Jennifer Moberly - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):286-289.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  1
    Power in Black and Pentecostal: An Engagement with Bretherton.R. David Muir - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):253-261.
    This article focuses on Bretherton’s treatment of Pentecostalism and Black Power and how they conceive and challenge notions of democracy, citizenship and capitalism. Recognising the ‘tensional’ relationship between democracy and Christianity, I explore his treatment of Pentecostalism and capitalism. I am sympathetic to Bretherton’s analysis of the socio-political transformation Pentecostalism offers, but point to regressive influences associated with the ‘prosperity gospel’. Relating his treatment of Black Power to the wider ‘Black radical tradition’, I conclude with reference to political activism in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  1
    The Professional Politician and the Activist.Oliver O’Donovan - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):243-252.
    Luke Bretherton wishes to encourage informal political activity, and asserts a contrast between two complementary and alternative ways of doing politics, formal and informal. But the tendency in his descriptions is to replace formal with informal politics, which is then in danger of being left without responsibility to the structures of political society.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  12
    Relational Views of Humanness: The Reciprocity of Ontos and Telos.Marcia Pally - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):224-234.
    This article explores humanity’s ontology of relationality and telos of the common good as not only inseparable but mutually constitutive, drawing on the work of Thomas Aquinas and looking into the debates between Charles De Koninck and Jacques Maritain.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  2
    Book Review: D. Stephen Long, Augustinian and Ecclesial Christian Ethics: On Loving Enemies. [REVIEW]Colin Patterson - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):283-286.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  2
    Is Religious Freedom Under Threat From British Equality Laws?Julian Rivers - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):179-193.
    A series of cases, some of them with a high media profile, suggest that freedom of religion or belief in the United Kingdom is being undermined by the operation of new equality laws. This article outlines the constitutional context for liberty and equality rights as well as the main ways in which religious liberty is secured by and within equality law. However, British equality law puts pressure on religious liberty in four ways: it confines the relevance of ‘religion’ to limited (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Historical Foundations and Enduring Fundamentals of American Religious Freedom.John Witte - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (2):156-167.
    The eighteenth-century American founders believed that religion is special and deserves special constitutional protection, and that all peaceable faiths must be drawn into the constitutional process and protection. The founders introduced six constitutional principles for the protection of religious freedom: freedom of conscience, free exercise of religion, religious pluralism, religious equality, separation of church and state, and no state establishment of religion. Since the 1940s, the United States Supreme Court has upheld these religious freedom principles in more than 170 cases, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  1
    Relationality and Attunement in Teaching Christian Ethics.Anna Abram - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):55-60.
    I identify my priority in teaching Christian ethics as fostering relationality, both in individual and collective contexts. I argue that focusing on the idea of relationality enables us to explore connections that exist or should exist between individuals and groups. For me, fostering relationality involves building an intellectual understanding of moral relationality and embodying this understanding in practical situations. In order to contain the theme of this study, I focus on a specific aspect of relationality, namely the idea of attunement. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  1
    After Vatican II and Veritatis Splendor: Five Moral Theology Textbooks. [REVIEW]Jana M. Bennett - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):70-84.
    Pedagogy in moral theology follows some of the particular concerns Catholic theologians have had since the Second Vatican Council as well as the aftermath of John Paul II’s encyclical on moral theology, Veritatis splendor. Most of the textbooks reviewed here teach virtue, Christian practice, and Thomas Aquinas’s theology, as largely positive responses to the Council and John Paul II. Catholic moral theology thus appears as a relatively stable field, though the authors use multiple approaches. There are, however, some moral theologians (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  4
    After Vatican II and Veritatis Splendor: Five Moral Theology Textbooks. [REVIEW]Jana M. Bennett - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):70-84.
    Pedagogy in moral theology follows some of the particular concerns Catholic theologians have had since the Second Vatican Council as well as the aftermath of John Paul II’s encyclical on moral theology, Veritatis splendor. Most of the textbooks reviewed here teach virtue, Christian practice, and Thomas Aquinas’s theology, as largely positive responses to the Council and John Paul II. Catholic moral theology thus appears as a relatively stable field, though the authors use multiple approaches. There are, however, some moral theologians (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  3
    Integrating Christian Ethics with Ignatian Spirituality.Jennifer E. Beste - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):61-67.
    If Christian ethics is to have an authentic connection to Jesus Christ, it is crucial to establish pedagogical objectives and best practices that are transformative. In this article, I examine how integrating Christian sexual ethics with Ignatian spirituality has fostered many students’ holistic growth and commitment to justice.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  2
    Prayer and the Teaching of Christian Ethics: Socratic Dialogue with God?Brian Brock - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):40-54.
    In his Confessions Augustine recasts the Greco-Roman dialogue as a conversation with God. This repositioning of the premier pedagogical form of the ancient world Augustine takes as an implication of the Christian confession of God as a speaking God. Introducing Jewish forms of prayer into the Greco-Roman dialogue form transforms it in a manner that has implications for the teaching of Christian ethics today, in offering a theologically elaborated model of the formative and investigative power of conversation. Conversational learning is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  2
    Book Review: Todd Breyfogle, On Creativity, Liberty, Love and the Beauty of the Law Ian Clausen, On Love, Confession, Surrender and the Moral Self. [REVIEW]Fellipe do Vale - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):119-124.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  4
    Book Review: Wayne Grudem, Christian Ethics: An Introduction to Biblical Moral Reasoning. [REVIEW]Andrew Errington - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):124-128.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  1
    Book Review: Kate Ott, Christian Ethics for a Digital Society. [REVIEW]Antonin Ficatier - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):130-133.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  1
    Book Review: Craig A. Boyd and Don Thorsen, Christian Ethics and Moral Philosophy: An Introduction to Issues and Approaches. [REVIEW]Fabian F. Grassl - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):116-119.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  3
    Derrida on Law and Blood. [REVIEW]Kevin Hart - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):107-115.
    In his lectures on the death penalty Jacques Derrida argues the surprising thesis that ‘no philosophical system as such has ever been able rationally to oppose the death penalty’. And he also entertains a second thesis that juridical execution undergirds the legal system. In his support for abolitionism, Derrida participates in ‘philosophy’ without quite belonging there. In fact, he maintains that juridical execution comes into sharper focus only when we pass from philosophy to theology. There is space for further passage (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  1
    Derrida on Law and Blood. [REVIEW]Kevin Hart - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):107-115.
    In his lectures on the death penalty Jacques Derrida argues the surprising thesis that ‘no philosophical system as such has ever been able rationally to oppose the death penalty’. And he also entertains a second thesis that juridical execution undergirds the legal system. In his support for abolitionism, Derrida participates in ‘philosophy’ without quite belonging there. In fact, he maintains that juridical execution comes into sharper focus only when we pass from philosophy to theology. There is space for further passage (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  4
    Making and Being Made: Some Preliminary Thoughts on Craft-Education as a Model for Christian Formation.Morwenna Ludlow - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):3-14.
    Craft-education was an important pedagogical model in the ancient world, but its importance was obscured by the common contrast between rhetoric and philosophy. Christian writers such as Gregory of Nyssa used craft-education as a model for Christian formation, because of its powerful emphasis on commitment, time, effort and the willingness of both pupil and teacher to submit to change. In the latter part of my article I will offer a preliminary assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of craft-education as a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  3
    Back to the Basics: The Resurgence of Moral Formation in American Protestant Ethics. [REVIEW]Paul Martens - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):85-94.
    In the North American context, one trend in introductory Protestant Christian ethics texts is clear: the desire to draw the focus away from moral pronouncements about contemporary ‘issues’ in order to concentrate on what it means to be truly human, that is, to see the world as followers of Christ made in the image of God and to employ forms of moral reasoning appropriate to this vision. The article illuminates the particular emphases displayed in contemporary Protestant ethics texts published in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  4
    Back to the Basics: The Resurgence of Moral Formation in American Protestant Ethics. [REVIEW]Paul Martens - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):85-94.
    In the North American context, one trend in introductory Protestant Christian ethics texts is clear: the desire to draw the focus away from moral pronouncements about contemporary ‘issues’ in order to concentrate on what it means to be truly human, that is, to see the world as followers of Christ made in the image of God and to employ forms of moral reasoning appropriate to this vision. The article illuminates the particular emphases displayed in contemporary Protestant ethics texts published in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  4
    Being Perfect: A Lutheran Perspective on Moral Formation.Ian A. McFarland - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):15-26.
    Jennifer Herdt argues that Luther’s account of human ethical action implies an absolute passivity before God that both leads to psychological paralysis and fails to appreciate the non-competitive nature of the relationship between divine and human agency. This article argues that neither accusation can be sustained. Not only does Luther’s work lack any evidence of the paralysis Herdt ascribes to him, but Luther’s understanding of the relationship between divine and human action reflects a more theologically persuasive understanding of the distinct (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  2
    Book Review: Esther D. Reed, with a Foreword by D. Stephen Long, The Limit of Responsibility: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Ethics for a Globalizing Era. [REVIEW]Kevin O’Farrell - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):133-137.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  4
    Should Jesus Christ Be at the Centre of Introductions to Christian Ethics? [REVIEW]Nicholas Townsend - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):95-106.
    Prima facie, Christian ethics will be centred on Jesus Christ, but to what extent can and should textbooks for academic study of the field have this focus? Perhaps the two most influential Anglophone Christian ethicists of recent decades are Stanley Hauerwas and Oliver O’Donovan. Their introductory volumes were both very Christocentric although in different ways. Yet recent textbooks in the discipline generally do not manifest such a strong focus on Jesus Christ. This generates one criterion by which we might assess (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  3
    Reviewing Textbooks in Christian Ethics and Moral Theology: Introduction.Nicholas Townsend - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):68-69.
    Prima facie, Christian ethics will be centred on Jesus Christ, but to what extent can and should textbooks for academic study of the field have this focus? Perhaps the two most influential Anglophone Christian ethicists of recent decades are Stanley Hauerwas and Oliver O’Donovan. Their introductory volumes were both very Christocentric although in different ways. Yet recent textbooks in the discipline generally do not manifest such a strong focus on Jesus Christ. This generates one criterion by which we might assess (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  4
    Should Jesus Christ Be at the Centre of Introductions to Christian Ethics? [REVIEW]Nicholas Townsend - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):95-106.
    Prima facie, Christian ethics will be centred on Jesus Christ, but to what extent can and should textbooks for academic study of the field have this focus? Perhaps the two most influential Anglophone Christian ethicists of recent decades are Stanley Hauerwas and Oliver O’Donovan. Their introductory volumes were both very Christocentric although in different ways. Yet recent textbooks in the discipline generally do not manifest such a strong focus on Jesus Christ. This generates one criterion by which we might assess (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  2
    Christian Formation and Moral Pluralism: Challenges and Opportunities.Darlene Fozard Weaver - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):27-39.
    Moral diversity presents challenges and opportunities for Christian ethics, especially with regard to education and formation. Moral pluralism designates a response to that diversity predicated on the belief that such diversity is good and worthy of protection. Is moral pluralism a viable and authentically Christian stance? Attention to moral pluralism in Christian ethics is often muted or implied. Moreover, features of some Christian moral traditions make it difficult to envision a Christian affirmation of moral diversity as good. This article invites (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  4
    Book Review: Christian B. Miller, The Character Gap: How Good Are We? [REVIEW]James Woodward - 2020 - Studies in Christian Ethics 33 (1):128-130.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues