Year:

  1.  4
    Ageing and the Technological Imaginary: Living and Dying in the Age of Perpetual Innovation.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):20-35.
    Technology tends toward perpetual innovation. Technology, enabled by both political and economic structures, propels society forward in a kind of technological evolution. The moment a novel piece of technology is in place, immediately innovations are attempted in a process of unending betterment. Bernard Stiegler suggests that, contra Heidegger, it is not being-toward-death that shapes human perception of time, life, death, and meaning. Rather, it is technological innovation that shapes human perception of time, life, death, and meaning. In fact, for Stiegler, (...)
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  2. Book Review: Nigel Zimmermann, Facing the Other: John Paul II, Levinas, and the Body. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Bloechl - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):142-144.
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  3. Book Review: John J. Fitzgerald, The Seductiveness of Virtue: Abraham Joshua Heschel and John Paul II on Morality and Personal Fulfillment. [REVIEW]Michael Bradley - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):138-142.
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  4.  3
    Still Human: A Thomistic Analysis of ‘Persistent Vegetative State’.Stewart Clem - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):46-55.
    Would Aquinas hold the view that a patient in a persistent vegetative state (PVS) is something other than a human being? Some recent interpreters have argued for this position. I contend that this reading is grounded in a false symmetry between the three stages of Aquinas’s embryology and the (alleged) three-stage process of death. Instead, I show that there are textual grounds for rejecting the view that the absence of higher brain activity in a patient would lead Aquinas to say (...)
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  5. Book Review: David Elliot, Hope and Christian Ethics. [REVIEW]Andrew Errington - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):135-138.
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  6. A Politics of Tending and Transformation.Molly Farneth - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):113-118.
    In Awaiting the King: Reforming Public Theology, James K. A. Smith gives us a liturgical political theology. The question posed here is whether that political theology attends to how the work of tending to the goods held in common by diverse democratic publics can also surprise and transform Christians and the liturgies of the Church.
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  7.  1
    What Hippo and Grand Rapids Have to Say to Each Other.Eric Gregory - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):119-123.
    This essay situates James K. A. Smith’s Awaiting the King: Reforming Public Theology in the context of contemporary social criticism, Augustinian politics, and the cultural turn in religious ethics. While commending Smith’s liturgical ambitions and newfound appreciation for the democratic tradition, I raise critical questions pertaining to eschatology, war and nationhood, and the extent to which he overcomes familiar debates in Christian social ethics.
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  8.  4
    A Panel Discussion of James K. A. Smith’s Awaiting the King: Reforming Public Theology * : Introduction: An Augustine for Our Time.David P. Henreckson - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):105-107.
    James K. A. Smith’s book Awaiting the King interrogates the religious nature of contemporary politics and the political nature of Christian practice, and in doing so draws Augustine out of the ivory tower to which many have confined him, putting the late-antique theologian into a conversation with a host of contemporary voices.
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  9.  3
    The Moral Aesthetics of Compulsory Ultrasound Viewing and the Theological Future of Abortion.Craig Hovey - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):78-87.
    By law, women seeking abortions in some US states must undergo compulsory ultrasound viewing. This article examines the moral significance of this practice, especially as understood by pro-life religious groups, in light of Foucault’s recently published lectures on ‘The Will to Know’ and the place of the aesthetic. How does the larger abortion-debate strategy of ‘showing’ and ‘seeing’ images—whether of living or dead fetuses—work as an aesthetic form of argument that intends to evoke a moral response in the absence of (...)
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  10.  5
    A Life with Limits: A Christian Ethical Investigation of Radically Prolonging Human Lifespans.Manitza Kotzé - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):56-65.
    Recent biotechnological advances pose topical challenges to Christian ethics. One such development is the attempt to try and enhance human beings and what it means to be human, also through radical life extension. In this contribution I am especially interested in limited human lifespan and attempts to radically prolong it. Although there are a number of ethical issues raised by critics, one of the most profound ethical and theological issues raised by these efforts is the question of equity and justice. (...)
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  11.  1
    Challenges in the Appropriation of Augustine.Gregory W. Lee - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):124-128.
    James K. A. Smith’s Awaiting the King is the most effective popularization of Augustine’s political thought currently available, but its reliance on the work of Oliver O’Donovan obscures uncomfortable elements of Augustine’s thought, and it does not adequately address how the racial and socioeconomic composition of Christian communities is itself formative.
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  12.  3
    How to Be Political: Smith’s Primer for Pilgrim Citizens.Jennifer Leigh - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):108-112.
    This paper sets James K. A. Smith’s Awaiting the King against the background of the previous volumes in Smith’s Cultural Liturgies trilogy, and outlines this book’s argument for readers not familiar with it, bringing out the influence of St Augustine and Oliver O’Donovan. It draws attention to Smith’s responses within the book to earlier critics and, in turn, points towards two lines of critique of it.
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  13.  3
    Genetic Enhancements and Relational Autonomy: Christian Ethics and the Child’s Autonomy in Vulnerability.Alexander Massmann - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):88-104.
    Technical advances in genome editing methods raise the question how autonomy should figure in theological ethical debates about genetic enhancements. Thinking primarily of the parents’ reproductive autonomy, several secular and theological thinkers argue parents should be allowed to ‘enhance’ an embryo genetically. Jürgen Habermas’s critique of enhancements in the name of the child’s autonomy, meanwhile, has been met with a critique of autonomy in theology. This article argues that theological views about God’s relationship to the creature provide strong theological grounds (...)
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  14.  2
    Gentle Space-Making: Christian Silent Prayer, Mindfulness, and Kenotic Identity Formation.Travis Ryan Pickell - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):66-77.
    The practice of mindfulness has reached an unprecedented level of prevalence in the US and the UK, both in terms of widespread popularity and in terms of institutional support and investment. One potential clue to this phenomenon may be found in the nature of the institutional contexts that are increasingly being filled with mindfulness practitioners and seminars: each is deeply embedded in and pervaded by what philosopher Charles Taylor calls the ‘modern identity’. This article provides an analysis of mindfulness as (...)
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  15. Care, Coercion and Dignity at the End of Life.Cathriona Russell - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):36-45.
    End-of-life debates in medical ethics often centre around several interrelated issues: improving care, avoiding coercion, and recognising the dignity and rights of the terminally ill. Care ethics advocates relational autonomy and non-abandonment. These commitments, however, face system pressures—economic, social and legal—that can be coercive. This article takes up two related aspects in this domain of ethics. Firstly, that competence and communication are core clinical ethics principles that can sidestep the overplayed dichotomies in end-of-life care. And secondly, it questions the assumption (...)
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  16.  3
    A Response to Critics.James K. A. Smith - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):129-134.
    The author responds to critics of Awaiting the King, addressing especially questions about Augustinian liberalism and the church’s complicity in, and responsibility for, disordered liturgies, raising fundamental questions about the relationship between church and world.
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  17.  2
    Walking, Wounds and Washing Feet: Pedetic Textures of a Theo-Ethical Response to Migration.Susanna Snyder - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):3-19.
    Feet play a crucial role in migration, and experiences of death and hopes for new life are etched into migrants’ soles. In the face of complex and fraught ethical debates that have largely been deontological and teleological in tone, this article employs feet and footwashing as heuristic devices to suggest the need for receiving communities to develop a multi-textured virtue-based response alongside these. Cultivation of a habitus rooted in attention to bodies, service, power subversion, mutuality and confession could lead to (...)
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